8 Ways You Might Be Endangering Your Dog Without Realizing It

iStock/stock_colors
iStock/stock_colors

As a dog parent, you want to make sure you're doing everything right when it comes to the care and well-being of your four-legged companion. Whether it's choosing the right dog food or buying them all the best toys, you just want to give your dog a happy and healthy life.

However, according to Bright Side, there are some potentially dangerous things you may be doing as often as everyday without even realizing it could harm your dog. Here are eight ways you may be unknowingly endangering your dog.

1. LEAVING THEM ALONE IN THE CAR

This one is fairly common knowledge at this point, but we wanted to include it because it's so important to never leave your dog alone in a car! According to Bright Side, ​internal car temperatures go up by 20 degrees in 10 minutes, regardless of whether you're parked directly in the sun or not. Dogs don't sweat like us, so overheating is extremely easy, and it's hard to tell when they're getting too hot.

2. CHOOSING THE WRONG COLLAR SIZE

Puppy wearing a super large studded collar
iStock/Maximilian100

Choosing the correct size of collar is important for both the safety and comfort of your pup. You don't want it to be so loose that they can slip out of it, nor do you want it so tight that they're constricted. The general rule is that if you can fit a finger between the collar and dog for small and medium sizes, and two fingers for big dogs, you should be set.

3. TAKING A PUPPY TO A DOG PARK

There have been stories of puppies being attacked at dog parks, and it can easily be due to the fact that larger dogs who are playing or roughhousing with one another can easily scare and/or attack your small puppy. Better to keep their play area in a controlled setting until they're bigger.

4. YELLING AT THEM WHEN THEY'VE DONE SOMETHING WRONG

Businessman in a suit takes his dog for a walk
iStock/Spiderplay

Just as yelling at another person when they do something you think is wrong rarely improves a situation, yelling at your dog is even less productive. If you're yelling at your dog for something that happened a while ago—for example, if you come home to a mess that could've happened hours ago—not only are they just going to be scared, but they'll also be confused. It won't seem like punishment for what they did wrong, they'll just see you as the enemy.

5. PHYSICALLY PUNISHING THEM WHEN THEY DO SOMETHING WRONG

Bright Side emphasizes that physical punishment only assures one thing: your dog will be afraid of you. Using a reward-based system to train your dog is the key to a much happier, and well-behaved, pup.

6. NEGLECTING BREED-SPECIFIC HEALTH REQUIREMENTS

Small dog with a large underbite
iStock/Rolf_52

From grooming needs to health issues, every breed of dog has its own specific requirements. Be sure to familiarize yourself with the specific needs of your dog's breed, as well as any potential warning signs associated with specific health issues they may be prone to, in order to give your dog the best care.

7. NOT BRUSHING THEIR TEETH

Your dog's teeth should be brushed almost as often as yours. It's recommended to start getting them used to the routine when they're puppies, so that you can avoid a mini-wrestling match with them every time you try to brush as they get older. Supplemental chewing sticks aren't nearly as effective as actual brushing, because if you're doing the brushing you can assure every tooth is reached. Be sure to use dog-specific toothpaste as well.

8. NOT KEEPING THEM MENTALLY AND PHYSICALLY STIMULATED

Bad dog sits on chewed up couch
iStock/stephanie phillips

Dogs basically need as much mental and physical activity as people. You should be regularly walking your dog and making sure they're exposed to a mix-up in their routine every so often (e.g. Bright Side recommends exposing them to different sounds and smells to increase brain activity). If your dog gets bored, they'll find a way to entertain themselves—which usually means destroying some of your personal belongings.

The Time German and Russian WWI Soldiers Banded Together to Fight Wolves

iStock.com/567185
iStock.com/567185

During the winter of 1917, Russian and German soldiers fighting in the dreary trenches of the Great War’s Eastern Front had a lot to fear: enemy bullets, trench foot, frostbite, countless diseases, shrapnel, bayonets, tanks, sniper fire. Oh, and wolves.

In February of that year, a dispatch from Berlin noted that large packs of wolves were creeping from the forests of Lithuania and Volhynia into the interior of the German Empire, not far from the front lines. Like so many living creatures, the animals had been driven from their homes by the war and were now simply looking for something to eat. “As the beasts are very hungry, they penetrate into the villages and kill calves, sheep, goats, and other livestock,” the report, which appeared in the El Paso Herald, says. “In two cases children have been attacked by them.”

According to another dispatch out of St. Petersburg, the wolves were such a nuisance on the battlefield that they were one of the few things that could bring soldiers from both sides together. “Parties of Russian and German scouts met recently and were hotly engaged in a skirmish when a large pack of wolves dashed on the scene and attacked the wounded,” the report says, according to the Oklahoma City Times. “Hostilities were at once suspended and Germans and Russians instinctively attacked the pack, killing about 50 wolves.” It was an unspoken agreement among snipers that, if the Russians and Germans decided to engage in a collective wolf-hunt, all firing would cease.

Take this July 1917 New York Times report describing how soldiers in the Kovno-Wilna Minsk district (near modern Vilnius, Lithuania) decided to cease hostilities to fight this furry common enemy:

"Poison, rifle fire, hand grenades, and even machine guns were successively tried in attempts to eradicate the nuisance. But all to no avail. The wolves—nowhere to be found quite so large and powerful as in Russia—were desperate in their hunger and regardless of danger. Fresh packs would appear in place of those that were killed by the Russian and German troops.

"As a last resort, the two adversaries, with the consent of their commanders, entered into negotiations for an armistice and joined forces to overcome the wolf plague. For a short time there was peace. And in no haphazard fashion was the task of vanquishing the mutual foe undertaken. The wolves were gradually rounded up, and eventually several hundred of them were killed. The others fled in all directions, making their escape from carnage the like of which they had never encountered."

Afterward, the soldiers presumably returned to their posts and resumed pointing their rifles at a more violent and dangerous enemy—each other.

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