This Chart Shows Just About Every Brewery in the U.S.

Pop Chart Lab
Pop Chart Lab

America is the land of the free and home of the beer—er, brave. We meant brave. With over 5000 breweries, microbreweries, and brewpubs scattered across the country, it’s easy to see how the U.S. earned the distinction of being the world's largest producer of craft beer. Using data from the Brewers Association, Pop Chart Lab paid homage to the nation’s domestic craft production by charting just about every brewery from sea to shining sea.

The brewery chart
Pop Chart Lab

Their research team also consulted the “r/beer” Reddit thread and Googled phrases like “new breweries in Chicago” and “closed breweries in Seattle” to ensure their information was up-to-date. The result: A “mega-sized” map with dots representing each brewery.

To make the information easier to digest, the chart is color-coded by the number of breweries per 100,000 people; the darkest sections have at least six breweries per 100,000 people, while the lightest areas have zero to 0.5 breweries. Zoom in on the East Coast and you'll notice that tiny Vermont is especially dense. In fact, in 2016 the Brewers Association named it the state with the most breweries per capita. The map is quite detailed, but click the corresponding links and you'll be able to zoom in on the Midwest and West Coast.

The 48-inch by 32-inch “Breweries of the United States” print costs $65 and is now available for pre-order online (shipping begins October 19). To place your order or see a larger version of the print in its entirety, check out Pop Chart Lab’s website.

What Are Your Chances of Dying from Everyday Activities? Chart Shows The Risks

iStock.com/Gwengoat
iStock.com/Gwengoat

Many of the things that cause people great distress—such as spiders, sharks, plane travel, and elevators—are considered "irrational" fears for a reason. That's because the things that are most likely to off you are far more mundane, as the below infographic spotted by Bored Panda shows.

The information was compiled by Best Health Degrees using data from the National Center for Health Statistics, and the chart outlines your “chances of dying” from scuba diving, bicycling, and traveling by car, among other activities.

Some of the statistics are a little surprising. For example, you’re far more likely to die while canoeing (the risk factor is 1 in 10,000) than while bungee jumping (1 in 500,000). Dance parties are slightly deadlier than skydiving—which is to say, these activities aren’t very dangerous at all. And you’ll probably be safe if you stick to video games, where the risk of death is 1 in 100 million.

The chart wraps everything up with a rather depressing statistic: “Regardless of all of these risks, your probability of dying during a given year doubles every eight years.” So, if you aren’t thoroughly scared to leave your house now, keep scrolling to see more death-related statistics from Best Health Degrees.

Your Chances of Dying

[h/t Bored Panda]

The Best and Worst Airports, Airlines, and Routes to Fly on Thanksgiving

iStock.com/simonkr
iStock.com/simonkr

Traveling around the holidays is always stressful, but depending on where you're starting out and where you're headed, it could be particularly bad. Especially if you're flying out of Oakland, Dallas, or Chicago, according to new data compiled by Treetopia, an online retailer devoted to artificial Christmas trees and wreaths.

Treetopia crunched some numbers to discover the worst airports, airlines, and days to travel around the Thanksgiving holiday, discovering that certain travelers have a much better better shot of having a smooth airport experience than others. In some cases, it could be a matter of going to the airport across town, even. Based on data from last November's holiday travel, here are the worst places to fly out of in late November:

A map of the airports in the U.S. with the worst flight delays on Thanksgiving
Treetopia

In Chicago, for instance, Midway faces some of the worst delays in the country around Thanksgiving, but O'Hare has one of the best track records. In the D.C. area, you're much better off flying out of Dulles (No. 5 on the Best Airports list) than the Baltimore-Washington airport (No. 9 on the Worst Airports list). And in the Bay Area, you want to avoid going to either Oakland (the country's worst airport for Thanksgiving travel, and a regular on most-delayed lists) or San Jose (the fifth worst). Hopefully you can fly out of San Francisco instead.

If you're looking for the most reliable travel experience, below are the best airports and airlines to fly that week, according to Treetopia's numbers.

A map of the best airports for Thanksgiving travel
Treetopia

However, your likelihood of delay is also affected by which airline you're flying with and what route you're traveling on. Shorter routes in particular seem to be at risk of delays—especially if you're flying within California.

Charts of the best and worst air travel routes to fly around Thanksgiving
Treetopia

And here are the airlines you should avoid and the ones you should gravitate toward if you're looking to get to Thanksgiving dinner on time:

Charts of the best and worst airlines to travel with on Thanksgiving
Treetopia

Best of luck at the airport this holiday season! And get ready: Christmas/holiday-travel season is just a few short weeks away.

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