The Top 20 Coffee Cities in the U.S.

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iStock

The City That Never Sleeps owes its nickname in part to the massive amounts of caffeine that fuel its citizenry. That’s right—New York City is the top coffee city in America, according to a new breakdown by WalletHub. The city has 17.4 times more coffee shops per capita than Laredo, Texas—the city with the fewest number of cafes.

In celebration of National Coffee Day this Saturday, September 29, the site used 14 criteria to assess the “coffee culture” in the country’s 100 largest cities. A few of these metrics include the number of coffee shops and cafes per capita, the average cost of a pack of coffee, the average price of a cappuccino, and the share of households that own coffee makers.

The fact that the top two spots are claimed by New York and Seattle probably won’t come as a shock to anyone. A few other cities on the top 20 list are less obvious, though. Miami, Florida, has the fourth lowest percentage of households that own coffee makers, but the city made up for it in other categories and came in at number eight on the list of best coffee cities overall.

Check out the full list below, and be sure to visit WalletHub’s website for a more detailed breakdown of which cities fared best (or worst) in each individual category.

1. New York, NY
2. Seattle, WA
3. San Francisco, CA
4. Portland, OR
5. Los Angeles, CA
6. Washington, DC
7. Chicago, IL
8. Miami, FL
9. Boston, MA
10. San Diego, CA
11. Denver, CO
12. Las Vegas, NV
13. Minneapolis, MN
14. Philadelphia, PA
15. Orlando, FL
16. Atlanta, GA
17. Austin, TX
18. Pittsburgh, PA
19. Oakland, CA
20. Fremont, CA

10,000 People Gathered at Stonehenge to Welcome the Summer Solstice

Finnbarr Webster, Getty Images
Finnbarr Webster, Getty Images

There are plenty of reasons to welcome the start of summer. Today, people visiting Stonehenge took that celebration to a whole new level.

The BBC reported that an estimated 10,000 people made the pilgrimage to the 5000-year-old site to partake in summer solstice festivities. "Stonehenge was built to align with the Sun, and to Neolithic people, the skies were arguably as important as the surrounding landscape," Susan Greaney, a senior historian at English Heritage, said in a statement. "At solstice we remember the changing daylight hours, but the changing seasons, the cycles of the Moon, and movements of the Sun are likely to have underpinned many practical spiritual aspects of Neolithic life."

These spiritual aspects are just one of the many fascinating facts about the summer solstice; the day is an extremely old calendar event recognized by ancient cultures across the globe. They include the Druids and other pagans, whose tradition of observing the solstice at Stonehenge has long been upheld by modern revelers.

Scientifically speaking, Stonehenge is an optimal viewing place for the solstice due to its structure. According to TIME, the site’s architects appeared to have kept both the summer and winter solstices in mind during its construction, as the positions of the stones are specifically tuned to complement the sky on both occasions.

The solstices were sacred to the pagans, whose modern-day followers continue to honor their rituals. Pagans in particular refer to the day as Litha, and mark it with activities such as meditation, fire rites, and outdoor yoga.

“What you’re celebrating on a mystical level is that you’re looking at light at its strongest," Frank Somers, a member of the Amesbury and Stonehenge Druids, said in 2014. "It represents things like the triumph of the king, the power of light over darkness, and just life—life at its fullest."

Those who were unable to make the journey can head over to the Stonehenge Skyscape project's website, where English Heritage’s interactive live feed fully captured the experience.

Hotels.com Wants to Pay You $10,000 to Test Out Some of America’s Fanciest Hotel Pools

iStock/FTiare
iStock/FTiare

Getting paid to hang out by the pool all summer may sound like a job that's too good to be true. But popular hotel booking site Hotels.com is looking to hire one lucky "Poolhop" to do just that—and pay them $10,000 for their efforts.

According to the official job application, "The Poolhop’s responsibilities are simple; travel to some of the most incredible hotel pools across the country, sip on fruity drinks, snap some photos, sport a hotel robe, and report back to reward-loving Hotels.com fans."

Along with the $10,000 stipend, the Poolhop's perks will include paid airfare and accommodations at six hotels across the country, one year of Hotels.com Gold Rewards member status, and “eternal bragging rights.” The only serious requirements are that applicants be at least 21 years of age and a U.S. resident. They must also, of course, know how to swim.

Thrillist reports that the chosen hotels aren’t your average accommodations, either. The Poolhop will get to dive into luxury at Hawaii's Four Seasons Resort Hualalai, the Mondrian Los Angeles, the SLS Las Vegas, Colorado's Garden of the Gods Club and Resort, The William Vale Hotel in New York City, and Miami Beach's National Hotel.

“No one wants to be sitting at a desk all summer,” Katie Junod, general manager of the Hotels.com brand in North America, said. "There are so many incredible hotel pools to explore across the country, and we want to give travelers a first-hand look at the crème de la crème. And who better to live the hotel life than our very own Hotels.com Poolhop?”

The trip will take place during two weeks in August. All applications must be filled out and submitted by Tuesday, June 25th. And don't forget your sunscreen!

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