4 Things JK Rowling Just Revealed About Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald

Jaap Buitendijk, Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.
Jaap Buitendijk, Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

by Natalie Zamora

The ​final trailer for Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald was released today, and besides getting seriously creeped out by Johnny Depp's Gellert Grindelwald and intrigued by Jude Law's Dumbledore, everyone was extremely shocked by the inclusion of Nagini. Voldemort's snake was no longer a reptile, but a whole woman.

Between all three elements, we are expecting some crazy stuff from the next installment in the series, and JK Rowling has added to the hype by answering fan questions on Twitter today following the trailer's release.

Here are four things the acclaimed author revealed about the upcoming film.

1. NAGINI IS A MALEDICTUS.

Upon first watch, the only thing we could figure to explain Nagini being a woman was that she had to be a horcrux. How else could a snake be a human? Well, Rowling explained she is actually a Maledictus, which is a female whose blood was cursed at birth, leading to her eventual transformation into a beast.

2. A MALEDICTUS IS NOT DESTINED TO BE EVIL BEFORE THE CURSE.

Rowling went on to explain that just because a Maledictus has cursed blood at birth, they are not destined to be cursed beforehand. "The slow transformation into a beast is beyond their control, but they aren't destined to be evil," she shared.

3. THE NAGINI FAN THEORY IS INCORRECT.

For those of you who still think Nagini was the snake trapped in the zoo at the beginning of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, Rowling is here to tell you no, that's not what happened! Calling it a "very persistent fan theory," the author explains it was never the same snake. That would be terribly sad.

4. DUMBLEDORE AND GRINDELWALD'S PAST WILL BE EXPLORED BOTH HERE AND IN FUTURE FILMS.

As for our two major characters, Rowling revealed the past and ​deep connection they share will be explored in the film, but even more so in the next installments.

Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald hits theaters on November 16, 2018.

Peter Dinklage Can't Say Benevolent in This Game of Thrones Blooper Reel

Helen Sloan, HBO
Helen Sloan, HBO

There are many adjectives one might use to describe HBO's Game of Thrones. While hilarious isn't usually one of them (though the series certainly has its moments of levity), that's the best way to describe the Game of Thrones blooper reel below, in which some of your favorite throne-seekers momentarily break character—and Peter Dinklage has a problem pronouncing the word benevolent. (Warning: profanity ahead!)

Ralph Fiennes Almost Turned Down Voldemort Role in Harry Potter Movies

WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT INC. HARRY POTTER PUBLISHING RIGHTS (C) J.K.R.
WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT INC. HARRY POTTER PUBLISHING RIGHTS (C) J.K.R.

Ralph Fiennes has earned Oscar nominations for Schindler's List and The English Patient, but his best-known role might be his performance as He Who Must Not Be Named, otherwise known as Voldemort, in the Harry Potter film series. While the movies introduced Fiennes and his work to a new generation of moviegoers, he recently revealed that he almost said no to the project altogether.

We first saw Fiennes as Voldemort in the fourth film in the series, 2005's Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, and he continued to play the Dark Lord of the Harry Potter universe until the series' conclusion in 2011.

Though fans would argue that it was the role Fiennes was born to play, saying "yes" was not an immediate decision for the celebrated actor.

"The truth is I was actually ignorant about the films and the books," the actor recently admitted while appearing on The Jonathan Ross Show when asked about his relationship to the Potterverse prior to taking on the role. "I was approached by the production. Mike Newell was directing the film that they wanted me to be in ... the first time Voldemort was going to appear physically."

"Out of ignorance I just sort of thought, this isn’t for me," Fiennes continued. "Quite stupidly I resisted, I was hesitant. I think the clincher was that my sister Martha—who has three children who were then probably about 12, 10, and 8—said, 'What do you mean? You’ve got to do it!' So then I rewound my thinking."

Potterheads everywhere owe a debt of gratitude to Fiennes's sister—and her kids.

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