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17 Creative Resumes Designed to Stand Out

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Barring bribes and nudity, potential employees need to do everything they can to stand out. What better way to demonstrate one's creativity than by applying it to a resume? Check out these 17 examples of CVs that likely got a second look from human resources. 

1. Ed Hamilton's Google Maps resume shows where in the world he's acquired his copywriting experience.

Google Maps

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2. Graphic designer Melissa Washin showed off her love of sewing with a fabric resume.

Melissa Makes Things

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3. While looking for a marketing job, Craig Baute designed this flowchart for prospective employers.

Craig Baute

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4. Nicholas wrapped his resume around a chocolate bar.

Reddit

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5. Robby Leonardi, an animator and programmer, made an interactive, online resume that looks like a video game.

rleonardi.com

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6. Philippe Dubost, a web product manager, built an incredibly detailed faux-Amazon page, where he was the featured product.

Phildub

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7. Eric Gandhi's resume for a web design job resembles the Google "did you mean" page.

Virb

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8. Brian Moose made his case to Pixar via an elaborate vintage-style package.

Moose Brain, Flickr

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9. Aspiring journalist Dawn Siff caught the (short) attention of employers with a six-second Vine.

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10. Jordan McDonnell designed a slideshow about himself and his skills set to help him land a dream job.

Slideshare

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11. Victor Rodriguez got this idea while eating breakfast.

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12. Sabrina Saccoccio invoked social media with her Facebook-styled CV.

Sabrina Saccoccio

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13. Scott McFadden applied his skills to an acoustic guitar in the hopes of landing a design gig with Gibson.

Scott McFadden

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14. Jenny Johns used all the elements of a board game to create her resume. The "instructions" detail her experience and previous clients.

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15. Jon Ryder offered a prescription drug box that listed his ingredients as "creativity, originality, and typing."

Jon Ryder

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16. Photographer Jens Lennartsson folded his pictures inside this action figure box featuring himself and sent it to 400 potential clients. 

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17. Or just create a fake ID of the person doing the hiring.

This possibly apocryphal story appears in Luke Sullivan's Hey Whipple, Squeeze This: A Guide to Creating Great Advertising:

An aspiring ad student wants to get a job at one of the elite ad agencies. But interviews there are hard to get.

He cuts a picture of the agency's creative director from a trade magazine, mounts it on a fake driver's license, and laminates it perfectly. He tucks the fake ID into an old, tattered wallet and then puts small copies of his best student work into the photo holders.

Here's the cool part.

He visits the agency, asks to use the bathroom, and then abandons the wallet on the sink counter.

The wallet's "returned" to the desk of the creative director, and the kid's hired.

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fun
How Urban Legends Like 'The Licked Hand' Are Born
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iStock

If you compare the scary stories you heard as a kid with those of your friends—even those who grew up across the country from you—you’ll probably hear some familiar tales. Maybe you tried to summon Bloody Mary by chanting her name in front of the mirror three times in a dark bathroom. Maybe you learned never to wonder what’s under a woman’s neck ribbon. Maybe you heard the one about the girl who feels her dog lick her hand in the middle of the night, only to wake up to find him hanging dead from the shower nozzle, the words “humans can lick too” written on the wall in the dog’s blood.

These ubiquitous, spooky folk tales exist everywhere, and a lot of them take surprisingly similar forms. How does a single story like the one often called “Humans Can Lick Too” or "The Licked Hand" make its way into every slumber party in America? Thrillist recently investigated the question with a few experts, finding that most of these stories have very deep roots.

In the case of The Licked Hand, its origins go back more than a century. In the 1990s, Snopes found that a similar motif dates back to an Englishman’s diary entry from 1871. In it, the diary keeper, Dearman Birchall, retold a story he heard at a party of a man whose wife woke him up in the middle of the night, urging him to go investigate what sounded like burglars in their home. He told his wife that it was only the dog, reaching out his hand. He felt the dog lick his hand … but in the morning, all his valuables were gone: He had clearly been robbed.

A similar theme shows up in the short story “The Diary of Mr. Poynter,” published in 1919 by M.R. James. In it, a character dozes off in an armchair, and thinks that he is petting his dog. It turns out, it’s some kind of hairy human figure that he flees from. The story seems to have evolved from there into its presently popular form, picking up steam in the 1960s. As with any folk tale, its exact form changes depending on the teller: sometimes the main character is an old lady, other times it’s a young girl.

You’ll probably hear these stories in the context of happening to a “friend of a friend,” making you more likely to believe the tale. It practically happened to someone you know! Kind of! The setting, too, is probably somewhere nearby. It might be in your neighborhood, or down by the local railroad tracks.

Thrillist spoke to Dr. Joseph Stubbersfield, a researcher in the UK who studies urban legends, who says the kind of stories that spread widely contain both social information and emotional resonance. Meaning they contain a message—you never know who’s lurking in your house—and are evocative.

If something is super scary or gross, you want to share it. Stories tend to warn against something: A study of English-language urban legends circulating online found that most warned listeners about the hazards of life (poisonous plants, dangerous animals, dangerous humans) rather than any kind of opportunities. We like to warn each other of the dangers that could be lurking around every corner, which makes sense considering our proven propensity to focus on and learn from negative information. And yes, that means telling each other to watch out for who’s licking our hands in the middle of the night.

Just something to keep in mind as you eagerly await Jezebel’s annual scary story contest.

[h/t Thrillist]

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Courtesy Chronicle Books
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Design
Inside This Pop-Up Book Are a Planetarium, a Speaker, a Decoder Ring, and More
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Courtesy Chronicle Books

Designer Kelli Anderson's new book is for more than just reading. This Book Is a Planetarium is really a collection of paper gadgets. With each thick, card stock page you turn, another surprise pops out.

"This book concisely explains—and actively demonstrates with six functional pop-up paper contraptions—the science at play in our everyday world," the book's back cover explains. It turns out, there's a whole lot you can do with a few pieces of paper and a little bit of imagination.

A book is open to reveal a spiralgraph inside.
Courtesy Chronicle Books

There's the eponymous planetarium, a paper dome that you can use with your cell phone's flashlight to project constellations onto the ceiling. There's a conical speaker, which you can use to amplify a smaller music player. There's a spiralgraph you can use to make geometric designs. There's a basic cipher you can use to encode and decode secret messages, and on its reverse side, a calendar. There's a stringed musical instrument you can play on. All are miniature, functional machines that can expand your perceptions of what a simple piece of paper can become.

The cover of This Book Is a Planetarium
Courtesy Chronicle Books

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