CLOSE
Original image

17 Creative Resumes Designed to Stand Out

Original image

Barring bribes and nudity, potential employees need to do everything they can to stand out. What better way to demonstrate one's creativity than by applying it to a resume? Check out these 17 examples of CVs that likely got a second look from human resources. 

1. Ed Hamilton's Google Maps resume shows where in the world he's acquired his copywriting experience.

Google Maps

*

2. Graphic designer Melissa Washin showed off her love of sewing with a fabric resume.

Melissa Makes Things

*

3. While looking for a marketing job, Craig Baute designed this flowchart for prospective employers.

Craig Baute

*

4. Nicholas wrapped his resume around a chocolate bar.

Reddit

*

5. Robby Leonardi, an animator and programmer, made an interactive, online resume that looks like a video game.

rleonardi.com

*

6. Philippe Dubost, a web product manager, built an incredibly detailed faux-Amazon page, where he was the featured product.

Phildub

*

7. Eric Gandhi's resume for a web design job resembles the Google "did you mean" page.

Virb

*

8. Brian Moose made his case to Pixar via an elaborate vintage-style package.

Moose Brain, Flickr

*

9. Aspiring journalist Dawn Siff caught the (short) attention of employers with a six-second Vine.

*

10. Jordan McDonnell designed a slideshow about himself and his skills set to help him land a dream job.

Slideshare

*

11. Victor Rodriguez got this idea while eating breakfast.

*

12. Sabrina Saccoccio invoked social media with her Facebook-styled CV.

Sabrina Saccoccio

*

13. Scott McFadden applied his skills to an acoustic guitar in the hopes of landing a design gig with Gibson.

Scott McFadden

*

14. Jenny Johns used all the elements of a board game to create her resume. The "instructions" detail her experience and previous clients.

*

15. Jon Ryder offered a prescription drug box that listed his ingredients as "creativity, originality, and typing."

Jon Ryder

*

16. Photographer Jens Lennartsson folded his pictures inside this action figure box featuring himself and sent it to 400 potential clients. 

*

17. Or just create a fake ID of the person doing the hiring.

This possibly apocryphal story appears in Luke Sullivan's Hey Whipple, Squeeze This: A Guide to Creating Great Advertising:

An aspiring ad student wants to get a job at one of the elite ad agencies. But interviews there are hard to get.

He cuts a picture of the agency's creative director from a trade magazine, mounts it on a fake driver's license, and laminates it perfectly. He tucks the fake ID into an old, tattered wallet and then puts small copies of his best student work into the photo holders.

Here's the cool part.

He visits the agency, asks to use the bathroom, and then abandons the wallet on the sink counter.

The wallet's "returned" to the desk of the creative director, and the kid's hired.

Original image
arrow
fun
New Tolkien-Themed Botany Book Describes the Plants of Middle-Earth
Original image

While reading The Lord of the Rings saga, it's hard not to notice J.R.R. Tolkien’s clear love of nature. The books are replete with descriptions of lush foliage, rolling prairies, and coniferous forests. A new botany book builds on that knowledge. Entertainment Weekly reports that Flora of Middle-Earth: Plants of J.R.R. Tolkien's Legendarium provides fantasy-loving naturalists with a round-up of plants that grow in Middle-earth.

Written by University of Florida botanist Walter Judd, the book explores the ecology, etymology, and importance of over 160 plants. Many are either real—coffee, barley, wheat, etc.—or based on real-life species. (For example, pipe-weed may be tobacco, and mallorns are large trees similar to beech trees.)

Using his botany background, Judd explores why Tolkien may have felt compelled to include each in his fantasy world. His analyses are paired with woodcut-style drawings by artist Graham Judd, which depict Middle-earth's flowers, vegetables, fruits, herbs, and shrubs in their "natural" environments.

Check out some plant illustrations from Flora of Middle-Earth below:

[h/t Entertainment Weekly]

Original image
Bertrand Guay/AFP/Getty Images
arrow
Pop Culture
Prince Is Getting His Own Pantone Color: Love Symbol #2
Original image
Bertrand Guay/AFP/Getty Images

Prince was music royalty, so it only makes sense that purple—the hue traditionally favored by monarchs—was his signature color. To memorialize the late singer/songwriter, who died in April 2016, the Pantone Color Institute and the Prince Estate have collaborated on a custom shade of dark purple to represent the High Priest of Pop.

Pantone

Called Love Symbol #2, "the color was inspired by Prince’s custom-made Yamaha piano, which was originally scheduled to go on tour with the performer before his untimely passing at the age of 57," Pantone stated in a press release. "The color pays tribute to Prince’s indelible mark on music, art, fashion, and culture."

Thanks to the 1984 film Purple Rain and its Oscar-winning music, Prince has long been associated with royal hue. Now, “while the spectrum of the color purple will still be used in respect to the 'Purple One,' Love Symbol #2 will be the official color across the brand he left behind,” according to Pantone.

We couldn’t think of a better way to celebrate the Funky One’s flamboyant legacy.

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios