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Mike Allred/Marvel Comics

The Most Interesting Comics of the Week

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Mike Allred/Marvel Comics

Every Wednesday, I highlight the most interesting new comics hitting comic shops, bookstores, Comixology, Kickstarter, and the web. These are not necessarily reviews insomuch as they are me pointing out new comics that are noteworthy for one reason or another. Feel free to comment below if there's a comic you've read recently that you want to talk about or an upcoming comic that you'd like me to consider highlighting.

1. 2000 AD Prog 1874

Various
2000 AD

For 37 years, the influential British science fiction magazine 2000 AD has been publishing weekly Progs of serialized short comics created by some of Britain's most famous creative talent. ("Prog” is short for "Programme," and it's the result of the publication being produced by legions of droids working under the watchful eye of 2000 AD's editor, Tharg, of the planet Quazann in the Betelguese system. So there’s that.)

Since every prog is made up of about five stories running around six pages each, the magazine likes to have a clean jumping-on point every once in a while with each story starting a new chapter at the same time. With Prog 1874, available this week, we get a new Judge Dredd story written by co-creator John Wagner about a young evaluator in the Justice Department who is having doubts about the nature of what they do there. 2000 AD co-creator Pat Mills returns with the ongoing adventures of Celtic barbarian Slâine with fully painted art by Simon Davis. Dan Abnett (whom American readers will know as the guy who revitalized Guardians of the Galaxy for Marvel) returns with Sinister Dexter. Jaegir, a brand new spin-off from long running 2000 AD property Rogue Trooper, brings a new female heroine to the magazine. And finally, another new series called Outlier about a private detective hunting down an alien serial killer begins in the Prog.

2000 AD has been available in monthly print packs at comic book stores for years but, the appeal is its availability on a weekly basis, especially via various subscription options. Now with digital iOS users can subscribe via the Newsstand app and web users can buy DRM-free downloads via 2000adonline.com. Weekly digital comics are becoming all the rage and 2000 AD is well positioned to capitalize on that trend with their decades of experience publishing on that schedule.

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2. Silver Surfer #1

Written by Dan Slott; art by Mike Allred; colors by Laura Allred
Marvel Comics

The Silver Surfer, created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby during their classic run on The Fantastic Four during the 1960s was very much a product of its time, what with his groovy philosophizing about the galaxy and his place within it. The Silver Surfer is popular enough to be frequently given a chance at his own series, but he usually can't carry it for very long before readers lose interest.

This time out, Dan Slott and Mike Allred have an idea that seems to be taken right from the Dr. Who playbook: pair the cold, analytical, otherworldly Surfer with a cute, down-to-earth and very human young woman. In this new series debuting this week, the Surfer meets Earth girl Dawn Greenwood and the two begin to travel the Marvel Universe together, hopefully giving readers a relatable character through which to enjoy the wonders of the cosmos.

Writer Dan Slott has been the Spider-man guy at Marvel for quite some time now and he's been doing an outstanding job finding fresh angles to take with that character. Here he's joined by husband-and-wife team Mike and Laura Allred whose retro-60s pop-art style is a perfect choice for the Silver Surfer. The Allreds have recently been working on the Fantastic Four spin-off FF where they were already playing around with Kirby creations. They always manage to perfectly capture the colorful appeal of comics from that era while giving it a contemporary spin that feels both tongue-in-cheek and lovingly genuine at the same time.

Read more about this book and look at some nice art over on Marvel.com

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3. Rat Queens Vol. 1: Sass & Sorcery

Written by Kurtis J. Weibe; art by Roc Upchurch
Image Comics

This week sees the release of the first collected volume of Image Comics' breakout hit Rat Queens. This book came out of nowhere from two relatively unknown creators. It's a Dungeons & Dragons-style fantasy book with an all-female cast of mercenaries who look and act unlike your typical medieval wenches. It's a comic full of crass humor, cursing, and graphic violence. Kurtis J. Weibe and Roc Upchurch's band of sword-wielding and trash-talking "Rat Queens" are a refreshing cast of characters.

The Queens are made up of four ass-kicking women, each with a distinct and almost incongruously modern personality. There's Violet, the hipster troll who’s cute when she shaves her beard; Betty the diminutive, happy go-lucky elf who has a penchant for drink and drugs; Dee, the atheist cleric who comes from a family that worships squids; and Hannah, the rockabilly sorceress. The way Roc Upchurch draws them makes you think you're watching a movie set in the Middle Ages but cast with actresses who look too contemporary for the roles, and that's part of the charm. The book does not take itself too seriously by any means, but it does take its female characters very seriously and does not objectify them. They’re all drawn with realistic body types and are not presented as mere eye candy. It's not surprising this comic has a growing and vocal female fan base.

Upchurch himself is yet another surprise with this book, being pretty new to the comics scene. His dynamic action scenes, spilling with blood and gore, are exactly what you want from an adventure book. A number of the fight scenes he illustrates here are astounding–but he is equally good at giving these characters relatable and recognizable personalities, which not every action-oriented artist can do.

You can preview Rat Queens and also purchase it directly from Image Comics' website here.

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4. The Only Living Boy

Written by David Gallaher; art by Steve Ellis
the-only-living-boy.com

Dave Gallaher and Steve Ellis are webcomic veterans at this point, and their first comic, High Noon, was one of the big hits out of DC's now defunct webcomic line Zuda. They've been collaborating on other comics since then such as Box 13one of the first digital-only comic to premier on Comixology. Their latest is an all-ages adventure book inspired by pulp serials, Saturday morning cartoons, Jack Kirby, and even the music of Paul Simon. It's called The Only Living Boy, and it follows the adventures of 12-year-old Erik who goes to sleep under a rock in Central Park and wakes up in a drastically changed New York that is now inhabited by dragons, monsters, and insect princesses—and he may be the last human being left alive.

Gallaher and Ellis have been working on The Only Living Boy for a while and have had both web and digital versions of it published in the past. They also successfully funded a print edition through Kickstarter in 2012. Starting today they are relaunching the webcomic and will begin posting new pages of the ongoing story every Monday, Wednesday and Friday.

Start reading here.

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5. The Chairs' Hiatus

By Matthew Bogart
Comixology Submit

Recently, Comixology had a sale on the top self-published books in their Submit program, giving 100 titles for only $10. When I can, I will be highlighting some comics from this bundle even though they are technically not “new" releases.

The Chairs' Hiatus is a quiet little story about an indie rock band called The Chairs that breaks up after a falling out between two of the members. We meet Mary Sozer, the band's front woman who's trying to live a quiet life, buying plungers at a hardware store without getting recognized. When her former band members Nel and Jen find her, Mary is forced to confront what she has run away from.

I originally stumbled across this comic after reading an article on Medium.com written by the book's author, Matthew Bogart, about his experience selling his comic through the Submit program. I was immediately drawn to his cartooning style and some of the interesting ways he handles the realistic, grounded subject matter of his story. His lines and character work remind me a little of Ethan Rilly (of the excellent comic Popehats). Bogart is a Portland-based cartoonist and he is currently working on a new ongoing comic called Oh, It's The End Of The World that he serializes on his website.

The Chairs' Hiatus is available on Comixology for $2.99. Bogart also has a Patreon page where you can support his comics work and receive various rewards for doing so.

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iStock
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Pop Culture
5 Bizarre Comic-Con News Stories from Years Past
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iStock

At its best, Comic-Con is a friendly place where like-minded people can celebrate their pop culture obsessions, and each other. And no one can make fun of you, no matter how lazy your cosplaying might be. You might think that at its worst, it’s just a series of long lines of costumed fans and small stores crammed into a convention center. But sometimes, throwing together 100,000-plus people from around the world in what feels like a carnival-type atmosphere where anything goes can have less than stellar results. Here are some highlights from past Comic-Con-tastrophes.

1. MAN IN HARRY POTTER T-SHIRT STABS ANOTHER MAN IN THE FACE—WITH A PEN

In 2010, two men waiting for a Comic-Con screening of the Seth Rogen alien comedy Paul got into a very adult argument about whether one of them was sitting too close to the other. Unable to come to a satisfactory conclusion with words, one man stabbed the other in the face with a pen. According to CNN, the attacker was led away wearing handcuffs and a Harry Potter T-shirt. In the aftermath, some Comic-Con attendees dealt with the attack in an oddly fitting way: They cosplayed as the victim, with pens protruding from bloody eye sockets.

2. MEMORABILIA THIEVES INVADE NEW YORK

Since its founding in 2006, New York Comic Con has attracted a few sticky-fingered attendees. In 2010, a man stole several rare comics from vendor Matt Nelson, co-founder of Texas’ Worldwide Comics. Just one of those, Whiz Comics No. 1, was worth $11,000, according to the New York Post. A few years later, in 2014, someone stole a $2000 “Dunny” action figure, which artist Jon-Paul Kaiser had painted during the event for Clutter magazine. And those are just the incidents that involved police; lower-scale cases of toys and comics disappearing from booths are an increasingly frustrating epidemic, according to some. “Comic Con theft is an issue we all sort of ignore,” collector Tracy Isenhour wrote on the blog of his company, Needless Essentials, in 2015. “I am here to tell you no more. It’s time for this garbage to stop."

3. CATWOMAN SAVES THE DAY

John Sciulli/Getty Images for Xbox

Adrianne Curry, winner of the first cycle of America’s Next Top Model, has made a career of chasing viral fame. Ironically, it was at Comic-Con in 2014 that Curry did something truly worthy of attention—though there wasn’t a camera in sight. Dressed as Catwoman, she was posing with fans alongside her friend Alicia Marie, who was dressed as Tigra. According to a Facebook post Marie wrote at the time, a fan tried to shove his hands into her bikini bottoms. She screamed, the man ran off, and Curry jumped to action. She “literally took off after dude WITH her Catwoman whip and chased him down, beat his a**,” Marie wrote. “Punched him across the face with the butt of her whip—he had zombie blood on his face—got on her costume.”

4. MAN POSES AS FUGITIVE-SEEKING INVESTIGATOR TO GET INTO VIP ROOM

The lines at Comic-Con are legendary, so one Utah man came up with a novel way to try and skip them altogether. In 2015, Jonathon M. Wall tried to get into Salt Lake Comic Con’s exclusive VIP enclave (normally a $10,000 ticket) by claiming he was an agent with the Air Force Office of Special Investigations, and needed to get into the VIP room “to catch a fugitive,” according to The San Diego Union Tribune. Not only does that story not even come close to making sense, it also adds up to impersonating a federal agent, a crime to which Wall pleaded guilty in April of this year and which carried a sentence of up to three years in prison and a $250,000 fine. In June, prosecutors announced that they were planning to reduce his crime from a felony to a misdemeanor.

5. MAN WALKS 645 MILES TO COMIC-CON, DRESSED AS A STORMTROOPER, TO HONOR HIS LATE WIFE

Michael Buckner/Getty Images for Disney

In 2015, Kevin Doyle walked 645 miles along the California coast to honor his late wife, Eileen. Doyle had met Eileen relatively late in life, when he was in his 50s, and they bonded over their shared love of Star Wars (he even proposed to her while dressed as Darth Vader). However, she died of cancer barely a year after they were married. Adrift and lonely, Doyle decided to honor her memory and their love of Star Wars by walking to Comic-Con—from San Francisco. “I feel like I’m so much better in the healing process than if I’d stayed home,” he told The San Diego Union Tribune.

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Funko
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Pop Culture
Funko Is Bringing a Ton of Old-School Hanna-Barbera Characters to Comic-Con
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Funko

Long before The Simpsons or SpongeBob SquarePants dominated the airwaves, classic Hanna-Barbera cartoons like Wacky Races, Scooby-Doo, and The Huckleberry Hound Show reigned supreme. Now, some of the American animation studio’s most nostalgic characters are getting the Funko treatment.

As Nerdist reports, the toy manufacturer is launching a pop-up store at Comic-Con International, which runs this year from July 20 through July 23 at the San Diego Convention Center. The Get Animated! Pop!-Up Shop will sell exclusive models of Hanna-Barbera characters that fans can't purchase anywhere else.

For Wacky Races aficionados, there's a Big Gruesome model, two Rufus Ruffcut figurines (both of which come with a tiny Sawtooth), and two Peter Perfect models, one of which includes the notoriously rickety Turbo Terrific drag racer.

A Funko figurine of Big Gruesome from the Hanna-Barbera cartoon
Funko

A Funko figurine of Rufus Ruffcut from the Hanna-Barbera cartoon “Wacky Races.”
Funko

A Funko figurine of Rufus Ruffcut from the Hanna-Barbera cartoon “Wacky Races.”
Funko

A Funko figurine of Peter Perfect from the Hanna-Barbera cartoon “Wacky Races.”
Funko

Scooby-Doo comes in three colors, including green, pink, and blue.

A Funko figurine of a green Scooby-Doo.
Funko

A Funko figurine of a pink Scooby-Doo.
Funko

A Funko figurine of a blue Scooby-Doo.
Funko

Funko also pays tribute to The Jetsons and Huckleberry Hound, with the beloved blue dog getting his own Pop! Animation eight-pack (each dog has a different outfit) and Rosie the Robot getting her own Pop! Animation three-pack.

A “Huckleberry Hound” Funko Pop! Animation 8-pack
Funko

“The Jetsons” Funko Pop! Animation 8-pack of Rosie the Robot
Funko

You can view the full round-up over at Nerdist, or by visiting Funko's blog.

[h/t Nerdist]

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