11 Podcasts That Will Get You in the Mood for Halloween

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Happy October! 'Tis the season to get spooky, and there's no better way to do it than with these podcasts, which run the gamut from spine-tingling fiction to bone-chilling true crime—making them the perfect listening in the run up to Halloween.

1. HAUNTED PLACES

The premise of this podcast is self-explanatory: In each episode, host Greg Polcyn takes listeners to a new haunted location around the world. So far, it's featured infamous tourist destinations—think the Winchester Mystery House and Paris's Catacombs—alongside places like Vermont's Bennington County Courthouse and Austin's Driskill Hotel. Each episode's storytelling is a blend of real history and creepy legends supplemented with spooky sound effects and Polcyn's narration. New episodes are released every Thursday. (If you can’t get enough of Polcyn, he co-hosts two other podcasts worth checking out: Serial Killers and Cults.)

2. THE NOSLEEP PODCAST

Fans of scary movies might enjoy NoSleep, a horror fiction podcast that comes with a warning: "[NoSleep] is intended for mature adults, not the faint of heart. Join us at your own risk…" NoSleep started as a subreddit devoted to original horror; in 2011, member Matt Hansen proposed a podcast, and David Cummings signed on to host and produce. The stories are brought to life by voice actors, sound effects, and spooky scores. "We're bringing the old-time radio show back into the modern culture," Cummings told the Chicago Tribune in 2017. "The audience members bring their own imaginations and fears. That really heightens their sense of connection."

NoSleep is currently in its 11th season, which it promised "has 16 candles we hope you can handle, with five tales about nasty nature, terrifying transformations, and malicious malls. This one might sting." If you're not sure where to start, the team has assembled a handy list of sample episodes you can check out.

3. PRETTY SCARY

Listeners who love My Favorite Murder will likely enjoy Pretty Scary. While the overall vibe of this podcast isn't exactly spooky—it's hosted by comics Adam Tod Brown, Caitlin Cutt, and Kari Martin, who bring humor to the proceedings—the subject matter is. Pretty Scary covers everything from true crime cases to conspiracy theories to the unexplained. Past episodes have explored the chupacabra, the ghost ship Mary Celeste, the effects of nuclear explosions, and murders that happened on Halloween.

4. INTO THE DARK

This podcast, just 23 episodes long, is hosted by Cooper B. Wilhelm, and it's the perfect pre-Halloween listening: It features "friendly interviews with practitioners and scholars of witchcraft and the occult arts, as well as answers to listener questions on occult subjects." Wilhelm is excellent at getting the witches and wizards he interviews to open up. Check out this episode, which features a discussion about Satanism versus Devil Worship.

5. UNEXPLAINED

This podcast, which drops bi-weekly, takes on events that defy explanation, "the space between what we think of as real and what is not. Where the unknown and paranormal meets the most radical ideas in science today…" Host Richard MacLean Smith explained to TVOvermind that he has three criteria for selecting stories to feature: "One, that it has a human element at the heart of it; two, that it is actually a story and not just an event (for example, like just saying, "this person was abducted on this day, and that's all they can remember"); and [third], that the unexplained mystery has never been sufficiently debunked."

Past episodes have covered the Stocksbridge Bypass (thought to be the most haunted road in the UK), Operation Cone of Power, and the disappearance of the Eilean Mòr Lighthouse Keepers.

6. HERE BE MONSTERS

Started by Jeff Emtman in 2012, Here Be Monsters—which is named after the cartography convention—describes itself as "a podcast created by and for people interested in pursuing their fears and facing the unknown." Emtman told The Guardian in 2015 that "What I do—and encourage the people who produce for the show to do—is take our fears and those moments of discomfort and pursue them. You poke around until you feel repulsion and then break it down into its constituent parts and chase each of those. Every time I've done that, I've found that the fears are relatively unfounded." Here Be Monsters has covered everything from a Satanic prayer line and a three-legged arctic fox to crow funerals and ASMR; each episode features an unsettling soundscape and is accompanied on the website by eerie art. The team—which also includes Bethany Denton and Nick White—recommends starting with new episodes and working your way backwards.

7. LIMETOWN

This expertly produced radio drama—which at first is almost indistinguishable from non-fiction—has drawn comparisons to both Serial and the television series The X-Files. It covers a fictional event, 10 years in the past, in which hundreds of people disappeared from a gated community in Tennessee without a trace. Its fictional host, Lia Haddock—whose uncle who vanished in the event—tries to unravel the mystery of what happened in Limetown. Creators Zack Akers and Skip Bronkie looked to NPR radio shows like Radiolab and This American Life "for direction and structure for how a radio documentary sounds," Akers told Vox, and real-life disappearances like that of the Roanoke Colony also served as inspiration. After you finish it, buy the prequel—a book that hits stores in November.

8. STUFF YOU MISSED IN HISTORY CLASS

This painstakingly researched podcast (hosts Tracy V. Wilson and Holly Frey spend between eight and 20 hours researching each episode) has covered plenty of horrifying historical events, and its Halloween episodes—of which there are several every year—are no exception. In the past, Wilson and Frey have covered the Villisca Axe Murders, the mysterious disappearance of Aaron Burr's only daughter, and Disneyland's Haunted Mansion.

9. DR. DEATH

Doctors are supposed to make sick people better, and in fact, they all must take an oath to do no harm. In the event they ignore that oath, the medical system is supposed to protect patients—but that doesn't always happen. Dr. Death follows the crimes of neurosurgeon Dr. Christopher Duntsch, who cut a path of destruction through the spines of his patients. It was preventable destruction that his various employers, and the medical system, simply did not do enough to stop. "One of the shocking things for me is that there were several gatekeepers along the way, there were several places where the entity involved could have stopped him—starting with his medical school—and nobody did," host Laura Beil said at a listening event for the podcast. "At every juncture something that should have happened to stop him didn't happen. And I don't know that that's even that unusual." What could be scarier than that?

10. SAWBONES

This is technically a comedy podcast, but if you don't find medical history scary, you might be dead. Hosted by Dr. Sydnee McElroy and her husband, Justin, the podcast—which takes its name from what surgeons used to be called—debuted in 2013. In the seasons since, it's covered topics from insomnia and asbestos to sleepwalking and spontaneous combustion and everything in between.

11. SNAP JUDGMENT PRESENTS: SPOOKED

Featuring true stories straight from people who say they've experienced paranormal phenomena, SPOOKED—which launched its second season in August—is hosted by Glynn Washington. The grandson of a seer, Washington saw his first exorcism as a teen. "There's nothing scarier or more mesmerizing than a real-life ghost story," he said. "The encounters in SPOOKED will stay with you beyond each episode and leave you questioning your understanding of reality." With its scary stories and spine-tingling sound design, SPOOKED is one you won't want to miss. Check out season one, episode six, "The Shadow Men," which features two tales: one about a house haunted by a malevolent spirit, and one about the things that went bump in the night for one border patrol agent.

9 Surprising Facts About James McAvoy

Chris Jackson, Getty Images
Chris Jackson, Getty Images

Whether you know James McAvoy from the X-Men movies or have been a fan since his early gigs on British television, there's no denying that 2019 has already been a very good year for the Scottish actor. In addition to his starring role in M. Night Shyamalan's Glass, McAvoy is set to star in June's Dark Phoenix, will be taking on the role of an adult Bill Denbrough in It: Chapter 2 in October, and will appear in the upcoming TV version of His Dark Materials later this year. And to top it all off, he’s turning 40 on April 21.

In celebration of McAvoy's big day—and even bigger year—here are some things you might not know about the Golden Globe-nominated actor.

1. He was raised by his grandparents.

James McAvoy was born in Glasgow, Scotland, to a psychiatric nurse and a builder. However, his parents split when he was seven, and because his mother was in poor health, McAvoy and his sister went to live with their maternal grandparents. While his mother lived with them on and off throughout his childhood, McAvoy hasn’t spoken to his father since he was a kid.

2. He considered becoming a priest.

McAvoy was brought up in the Roman Catholic church, but that wasn’t the reason he considered becoming a priest. Long before he decided to go the drama school route, he considered entering the priesthood because he thought it would give him an excuse to travel the world.

"I wanted to be a missionary, but it was only because I wanted a free ticket to go and explore the world," McAvoy told The Telegraph in 2006. "I realized I was using God and religion to get my kicks so I knocked that on the head."

3. He married his on-screen love interest.

Anne-Marie Duff and James McAvoy attends the Suffragette Premiere during the Opening Night Gala during the BFI London Film Festival at Leicester Square on October 7, 2015 in London, England
John Phillips, Getty Images for BFI

While working on the UK version of Shameless in the early 2000s, McAvoy met his on-screen love interest and future wife, Anne-Marie Duff. The pair started a relationship that they kept very private, and married in 2006. They went on to also star in 2009’s The Last Station together, but McAvoy later announced he would no longer be working with his then-wife.

"You have to weigh it up against how much of a headache it would be. It exposes you to a lot of questions," he told USA Today in 2011. "I'm very big in saying that I don't agree that if you put yourself in the spotlight, you have to accept it. I do think that if you work together as husband and wife, you're kind of asking for it." Ultimately, the couple split in 2016.

4. Acting was never his plan.

In addition to the priesthood, McAvoy considered a few others careers before he settled on acting. In fact, acting kind of happened by accident. While speaking to The Guardian in 2006, McAvoy explained that it wasn’t until director David Hayman came to his school to speak about the entertainment business that he knew he wanted to give it a go. He was so sure, in fact, that he reportedly approached Hayman after the talk and asked him for some work. (McAvoy's first credited role was in 1995's The Near Room, which Hayman directed.)

“I always believed that I never wanted to be an actor; I only did it because I was allowed to do it and I had to do something,” McAvoy explained. “I felt as if my career just happened to me. I hadn't actually engaged in it. I suppose I felt totally disempowered, just by this fate thing.”

5. Band of Brothers was his big break.

McAvoy’s big break came in HBO’s 2001 miniseries Band of Brothers, produced by Steven Spielberg and Tom Hanks. The actor played character James W. Miller in just one episode, but that’s all it took for his phone to start ringing; shortly thereafter, McAvoy scored notable roles on BBC’s Shameless (2004), The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (2005), and The Last King of Scotland (2006). He wasn't the only up-and-comer who made a name for himself with Band of Brothers: Michael Fassbender, Tom Hardy, and Dominic Cooper were among his co-stars.

6. He’s a Golden Globe nominee.

In 2007, McAvoy played Keira Knightley's love interest in Joe Wright’s period drama Atonement, based on the Ian McEwan novel. The role was one of the actor’s most moving performances to date, and scored him a Golden Globe nomination. Although he has wowed audiences in numerous parts since, such as the man with 23 different personalities in 2016’s Split (and 2019’s Glass), his role in Atonement has earned him the most critical acclaim. McAvoy, too, is a fan.

"[T]o find a film that was so epic, sweeping and romantic, yet be intelligent, was nice to me," McAvoy said. "Also the fact that it’s a very classic story, but it’s told in a very contemporary and modern way."

7. He was slightly tipsy the first time he met M. Night Shyamalan.

M. Night Shyamalan and James McAvoy attend the “Glass” Paris Gala Screening at la Cinematheque Francaise on January 07, 2019 in Paris, France
Kristy Sparow, Getty Images for Disney Studios

Speaking of Split and Glass: McAvoy was definitely in the right place at the right time—and in the right frame of mind—when he first met director M. Night Shyamalan. In a 2017 interview with The Guardian, McAvoy shared how he and Shyamalan just happened to cross paths at San Diego Comic-Con in 2015. "There was a big party, you couldn’t turn around without bumping into somebody off the telly," he said. "My mate Jesse was playing miniature golf in the middle of it. We were getting particularly drunk, and then I saw M. Night Shyamalan. He goes: ‘You’re James McAvoy!’ And I said: ‘You’re M Night Shyamalan! What do I call you?’ I was very drunk.”

Inebriated or not, Shyamalan saw something he liked. One month later, he was on the set of Split (in a role that Joaquin Phoenix was originally set to play, but dropped out of at the last minute).

8. He admires Samuel L. Jackson's no-nonsense attitude.

While promoting Glass, McAvoy participated in a lot of press events with Samuel L. Jackson, and was impressed by what he saw. "I saw examples of what I might be able to do when I got the balls he’s got,” McAvoy said. "That guy does not suffer fools, which is a positive quality. If he gets any kind of question that is in any way not thought out properly, he just drops the F-bomb and is like, ‘What are you talking about? What? What?’ He calls out [the journalist] so hard, and it’s the funniest thing."

9. He credits his success to a lot of luck.

When asked about the secret to his success, McAvoy doesn't mince words: "I got lucky," he told The Talks. "I got so f***ing lucky that I fell into the lap of a director when I was 16 and he gave me a part in a film and my horizons immediately exploded wide with all the weird people in it and all these crazy f***ing actors and directors and artistic people who were from all over the world. Through that one job I met people from England, I met people from America, and I met people from all over the place with challenging points of view and sympathetic points of view to mine. And then I went to a youth theater for six months as well, and that expanded my mind massively. It gave me so much more confidence to find out who I was and not be afraid of who I was simply because I’m in a scenario that I don’t understand ... I got really lucky. I got really, really lucky. It’s been a good ride for me."

Game of Thrones Star Sophie Turner Opened Up About Her Struggles With Depression

Helen Sloan, HBO
Helen Sloan, HBO

Playing one of the main characters on the most popular show currently on television isn't always as glamorous as it seems. Sometimes, the pressures of fame can be too much. Sophie Turner realized this while playing Sansa Stark on Game of Thrones, and has recently revealed how being in the public eye took a toll on her mental health.

Turner took on the role of Sansa Stark in 2011, when she was just a teenager, and she quickly became a household name. Now, at 23, she's come forward to Dr. Phil on his podcast Phil in the Blanks to explain how negative comments on social media affected her self-image and mental health.

"I would just believe it. I would say, ‘Yeah, I am spotty. I am fat. I am a bad actress.' I would just believe it," Turned explained. "I would get [the costume department] to tighten my corset a lot. I just got very, very self-conscious."

Later on, these feelings led to major depression. Turner developed a sense of isolation after she realized that all of her friends and family were going off to colleege while she was pursuing a sometimes-lonely acting career.

"I had no motivation to do anything or go out. Even with my best friends, I wouldn't want to see them, I wouldn't want to go out and eat with them," Turner explained. "I just would cry and cry and cry over just getting changed and putting on clothes and be like, 'I can't do this. I can't go outside. I have nothing that I want to do.'"

The feelings of depression stayed with Turner for most of the time she was filming Game of Thrones, and it's a battle she's still fighting. "I've suffered with my depression for five or six years now. The biggest challenge for me is getting out of bed and getting out of the house. Learning to love yourself is the biggest challenge," she continued.

The actress shared that she goes to a therapist and takes medication for her depression—two things that have helped her feel better.

Between Game of Thrones ending and planning her wedding to fiancé Joe Jonas, Turner may not have the time to take on many new acting roles in the near future. However, we'll continue to see her as Sansa Stark in the final season of Game of Thrones, and as Jean Grey in Dark Phoenix, which hits theaters on June 7.

[h/t: E! News]

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