How to Make Classic Chicken Noodle Soup With One Pot

iStock
iStock

Chicken noodle soup is the perfect meal to take you out of grilling season and into the days of comforting, cold-weather food. If you've only had chicken soup from your parents' kitchen or out of a can, you might assume the recipe takes more time than it's worth. But a soul-warming dish doesn't have to be labor-intensive: Martha Stewart's take on the recipe can be achieved with just one pot and 20 minutes of active cooking time.

Stewart's recipe for one-pot classic chicken noodle soup, from her book One Pot: 120+ Easy Meals from Your Skillet, Slow Cooker, Stockpot, and More, keeps things simple. Start with a whole chicken cut into eight pieces, or about four pounds of separate chicken parts, and add it to a stock pot with four cups of chicken broth, five cups of water, and one teaspoon of salt. Bring the water to a boil then reduce the heat to medium-low, skimming any foam off the surface as you go.

After giving the liquid a chance to simmer for five minutes, add your vegetables and aromatics: two sliced onions, four sliced carrots, 12 sprigs of parsley, two sliced celery stalks, and four crushed cloves of garlic. Partially cover the pot and let it simmer for 25 minutes.

Once the chicken is cooked through, remove it, along with the parsley, from the broth. Toss out the parsley and tear the chicken from the bones until you have about three cups of meat. Bring the broth back to a boil, then add two ounces of angel hair pasta and simmer for five minutes. Add the chicken meat back in and season the soup with salt and pepper to taste.

This recipe makes about eight servings, which works perfectly as a meal for a crowd or a make-ahead lunch for the week. If you're looking for more low-stress comfort food, check out this recipe for the world's best macaroni and cheese.

[h/t Martha Stewart]

Autumnal Dessert Spices and Cubed Meat Collide: Pumpkin Spice SPAM Now Exists

David McNew/Getty Images
David McNew/Getty Images

Does sipping on a pumpkin spice latte ever make you think: “Man, I wish this were cubed meat”? Soon, it will be. According to NBC News, Hormel will start selling Pumpkin Spice SPAM on September 23.

It all started back in October of 2017, when Hormel announced via its Facebook page that pumpkin spice SPAM was coming—as a joke. The post clearly stated that it wasn’t real, but that didn’t stop scores of people from making comments about how it would probably taste delicious and asking where they could purchase a can.

Now, a Hormel publicist has confirmed to NBC News that the limited-edition, fall-themed flavor will soon be available to order online from Walmart or Spam.com.

"True to the brand’s roots, SPAM Pumpkin Spice combines deliciousness with creativity, allowing the latest variety to be incorporated into a number of dishes, from on-trend brunch recipes to an easy, pick-me-up snack,” Hormel told NBC News.

While Pumpkin Spice SPAM might not yet be accepted into pumpkin spice canon alongside lattes and muffins, it’s far from the strangest product that has been imbued with the mysterious, cinnamon-y spice blend to date; we’ll leave automotive exhaust spray and light bulbs to duke it out for that designation. And the Facebook commenters might have actually been onto something when they dared to suggest that Pumpkin Spice SPAM had palatal potential. After all, ham recipes often include sweet ingredients like maple syrup, brown sugar, and honey. And, according to TIME, the word spam was invented as a portmanteau of spiced ham.

Wondering what other SPAM innovations you might be missing out on? Check out these recipes from around the world.

[h/t NBC News]

Ignacio Anaya García, the Genius Who Invented Nachos, Is Being Honored With a Google Doodle

AnnaPustynnikova/iStock via Getty Images
AnnaPustynnikova/iStock via Getty Images

Before nachos became one of the most beloved snack foods in North America and beyond, they were invented on a whim by a maître d' working in Piedras Negras, Mexico. Even if you've never heard Ignacio Anaya García's full name, you've certainly seen his nickname, "Nacho," in the appetizer sections of countless restaurant menus. On what would have been his 124th birthday, Google is honoring the culinary innovator with his own animated Doodle.

García was born in Mexico on August 15, 1895. His proper first name was Ignacio, but he went by the shortened version Nacho—a word that was not yet synonymous with tortilla chips covered in cheese.

In 1943, García conceived the dish that made his name famous. He was working at the popular restaurant Club Victoria near the Texas-Mexico border when a group of soldiers' wives from a nearby U.S. Army base came in to order a snack. The chef was nowhere to be found, so García temporarily abandoned his post to whip up something himself. His recipe—tortilla chips topped with grated Wisconsin cheese and sliced jalapeños—was dubbed Nachos especiales.

The creation was an immediate hit. Neighboring restaurants added their own versions of Nachos especiales to menus, and as early as 1949, a recipe for the snack appeared in an American cookbook. García never claimed legal rights to the dish, and it's still in the public domain today. But the Nacho behind nachos wasn't forgotten. Within 17 years of serving the first platter, he opened his own restaurant called El Nacho.

Google Doodle of Ignacio Anaya Garcia.
Google

Today's Google Doodle, animated by Mexico City-based artist Alfonso de Anda, recreates Nacho García assembling his namesake dish. "I hope people get an instant crave for a snack after they see the Doodle," de Anda told Google. "I also hope that they instantly drop whatever it is they're doing and satisfy that craving."

If you've ever enjoyed a plate of nachos, you now know who to thank for them.

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