12 Simpsons Easter Eggs You Might Have Missed

Simpsonsscreenshots.com
Simpsonsscreenshots.com

Even Simpsons obsessives who watch each episode repeatedly might not know everything about the beloved animated series. Here are 12 hidden gems from Springfield.

1. There's a Full, Hidden McBain Movie

Throughout the series, intermittent clips of action star Rainier Wolfcastle's character McBain pop up when the Simpsons are watching TV. Turns out, these clips can be pieced together to form an entire McBain movie with a structured narrative. Check it out above.

2. Principal Skinner is Jean Valjean from Les Miserables

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Here's a highbrow Simpsons theory: In an episode from season five, Principal Skinner reveals that his POW number in Vietnam was 24601, the same number as Les Miserables character Jean Valjean. Four years later in the season nine episode "The Principal and the Pauper," it is revealed that Skinner was a former criminal who stole another man's identity and became a respectable member of society, echoing Valjean's story.

3. Extremely Complex Math Jokes Are Hidden Throughout the Show

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The Simpsons is written by math whizzes, and they hide all sorts of complicated math jokes for eagle-eyed and egg-headed viewers, including a split-second moment in season ten's "The Wizard of Evergreen Terrace" when Homer (nearly) successfully disproves Fermat's last theorem.

4. In the Opening Credits, Maggie's Scanner Price Isn't Random

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In the original opening credits, when Maggie is swiped on the register, the till reads $847.63. This amount comes from a survey which said that $847.63 is the cost of raising a baby in America per month.

5. Holy Hands

God and Jesus are the only Simpsons characters to have five fingers on each hand. Everyone else has four (of course).

6. The reoccurring "A113"

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At various points in the series, "A113" has been used as the inmate/mugshot numbers for Krusty, Sideshow Bob, and Bart. The number itself is a reference to a room at the California Institute of the Arts and it has been used by many Cal Art alumni in other animated shows and Disney/Pixar movies.

See Also: 5 Real-Life Events Predicted by Simpsons Jokes

7. Professor Frink's Hidden Boast

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In the episode "Treehouse of Horror VI," Homer goes into a three-dimensional world. At one point, located behind him is a string of hexidecimal numbers: 46 72 69 6E 6B 20 72 75 6C 65 73 21. When converted to ASCII, these numbers read, "Frink rules!" in reference to Professor Frink.

8. Danny Elfman's Storefront

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The name of The Simpsons' theme song composer Danny Elfman is hidden on a storefront in the opening credits (as his theme begins to play).

9. Matt Groening Signs Homer

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Homer's hair and ear form an "M" and a "G," which is a reference to Simpsons' creator Matt Groening. The Simpsons make note of this in a season 16 episode.

10. Krusty the Clown and Homer Simpson Have Nearly Identical Character Models

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Ever notice that Homer looks like Krusty, sans makeup and hair? You are not alone. Dan Castellaneta (who voices both Krusty and Homer) said that they considered a plotline in which Krusty was going to use Homer as a disguise.

Also, some armchair psychiatrists theorize that Homer and Krusty's similarities are meant to be a central component of Bart's character. He doesn't respect Homer, but he idolizes a man who looks just like him. Deep.

11. Paul McCartney's Hidden Lentil Soup Recipe

In the season five episode "Lisa the Vegetarian," Paul McCartney says, "In fact, if you play ‘Maybe I’m Amazed’ backwards, you’ll find a recipe for a ripping lentil soup.” The joke doesn't end there—if you play the version of "Maybe I'm Amazed" that's featured in the closing credits backwards, you can hear Paul quietly recite a recipe for lentil soup in the background.

12. The Simpsons' Secret Cameos

Wikipedia

Seasons two and three featured cameos from superstars Dustin Hoffman and Michael Jackson. But the men weren't credited for their appearances for contractual reasons. The Simpsons later referenced these incidents in a season four episode. In "Itchy & Scratchy: The Movie," Lisa talks about the new Itchy & Scratchy movie saying, "It was the greatest movie I've ever seen in my life! And you wouldn't believe the celebrities who did cameos. Dustin Hoffman, Michael Jackson ... of course they didn't use their real names, but you could tell it was them."

Corrections: As commenters have correctly pointed out, an original version of this article had incorrect season numbers for "Stark Raving Dad," "Lisa's Substitute," and "Itchy & Scratchy: The Movie." D'oh!

6 Times There Were Ties at the Oscars

getty images (March and Beery)/ istock (oscar)
getty images (March and Beery)/ istock (oscar)

Only six ties have ever occurred during the Academy Awards's more than 90-year history. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) members vote for nominees in their corresponding categories; here are the six times they have come to a split decision.

1. Best Actor // 1932

Back in 1932, at the fifth annual Oscars ceremony, the voting rules were different than they are today. If a nominee received an achievement that came within three votes of the winner, then that achievement (or person) would also receive an award. Actor Fredric March had one more vote than competitor Wallace Beery, but because the votes were so close, the Academy honored both of them. (They beat the category’s only other nominee, Alfred Lunt.) March won for his performance in horror film Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and Beery won for The Champ (writer Frances Marion won Best Screenplay for the film), which was remade in 1979 with Ricky Schroder and Jon Voight. Both Beery and March were previous nominees: Beery was nominated for The Big House and March for The Royal Family of Broadway. March won another Oscar in 1947 for The Best Years of Our Lives, also a Best Picture winner. Fun fact: March was the first actor to win an Oscar for a horror film.

2. Best Documentary Short Subject // 1950

By 1950, the above rule had been changed, but there was still a tie at that year's Oscars. A Chance to Live, an 18-minute movie directed by James L. Shute, tied with animated film So Much for So Little. Shute’s film was a part of Time Inc.’s "The March of Time" newsreel series and chronicles Monsignor John Patrick Carroll-Abbing putting together a Boys’ Home in Italy. Directed by Bugs Bunny’s Chuck Jones, So Much for So Little was a 10-minute animated film about America’s troubling healthcare situation. The films were up against two other movies: a French film named 1848—about the French Revolution of 1848—and a Canadian film entitled The Rising Tide.

3. Best Actress // 1969

Probably the best-known Oscars tie, this was the second and last time an acting award was split. When presenter Ingrid Bergman opened up the envelope, she discovered a tie between newcomer Barbra Streisand and two-time Oscar winner Katharine Hepburn—both received 3030 votes. Streisand, who was 26 years old, tied with the 61-year-old The Lion in Winter star, who had already been nominated 10 times in her lengthy career, and won the Best Actress Oscar the previous year for Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner. Hepburn was not in attendance, so all eyes fell on Funny Girl winner Streisand, who wore a revealing, sequined bell-bottomed-pantsuit and gave an inspired speech. “Hello, gorgeous,” she famously said to the statuette, echoing her first line in Funny Girl.

A few years earlier, Babs had received a Tony nomination for her portrayal of Fanny Brice in the Broadway musical Funny Girl, but didn’t win. At this point in her career, she was a Grammy-winning singer, but Funny Girl was her movie debut (and what a debut it was). In 1974, Streisand was nominated again for The Way We Were, and won again in 1977 for her and Paul Williams’s song “Evergreen,” from A Star is Born. Four-time Oscar winner Hepburn won her final Oscar in 1982 for On Golden Pond.

4. Best Documentary Feature // 1987

The March 30, 1987 telecast made history with yet another documentary tie, this time for Documentary Feature. Oprah presented the awards to Brigitte Berman’s film about clarinetist Artie Shaw, Artie Shaw: Time is All You’ve Got, and to Down and Out in America, a film about widespread American poverty in the ‘80s. Former Oscar winner Lee Grant (who won the Best Supporting Actress Oscar in 1976 for Shampoo) directed Down and Out and won the award for producers Joseph Feury and Milton Justice. “This is for the people who are still down and out in America,” Grant said in her acceptance speech.

5. Best Short Film (Live Action) // 1995

More than 20 years ago—the same year Tom Hanks won for Forrest Gump—the Short Film (Live Action) category saw a tie between two disparate films: the 23-minute British comedy Franz Kafka’s It’s a Wonderful Life, and the LGBTQ youth film Trevor. Doctor Who star Peter Capaldi wrote and directed the former, which stars current Oscar nominee Richard E. Grant as Kafka. The BBC Scotland film envisions Kafka stumbling through writing The Metamorphosis.

Trevor is a dramatic film about a gay 13-year-old boy who attempts suicide. Written by James Lecesne and directed by Peggy Rajski, the film inspired the creation of The Trevor Project to help gay youths in crisis. “We made our film for anyone who’s ever felt like an outsider,” Rajski said in her acceptance speech, which came after Capaldi's. “It celebrates all those who make it through difficult times and mourns those who didn’t.” It was yet another short film ahead of its time.

6. Best Sound Editing // 2013

The latest Oscar tie happened in 2013, when Zero Dark Thirty and Skyfall beat Argo, Django Unchained, and Life of Pi in sound editing. Mark Wahlberg and his animated co-star Ted presented the award to Zero Dark Thirty’s Paul N.J. Ottosson and Skyfall’s Per Hallberg and Karen Baker Landers. “No B.S., we have a tie,” Wahlberg told the crowd, assuring them he wasn’t kidding. Ottosson was announced first and gave his speech before Hallberg and Baker Landers found out that they were the other victors.

It wasn’t any of the winners' first trip to the rodeo: Ottosson won two in 2010 for his previous collaboration with Kathryn Bigelow, The Hurt Locker (Best Achievement in Sound Editing and Sound Mixing); Hallberg previously won an Oscar for Best Sound Effects Editing for Braveheart in 1996, and in 2008 both Hallberg and Baker Landers won Best Achievement in Sound Editing for The Bourne Ultimatum.

Ottosson told The Hollywood Reporter he possibly predicted his win: “Just before our category came up another fellow nominee sat next to me and I said, ‘What if there’s a tie, what would they do?’ and then we got a tie,” Ottosson said. Hallberg also commented to the Reporter on his win. “Any time that you get involved in some kind of history making, that would be good.”

New Harry Potter Scrabble Accepts Wizarding Words Like Hogwarts and Dobby

USAopoly
USAopoly

Patronus, Hogwarts, and Dobby may not be words found in the official Scrabble dictionary, but they are very real to Harry Potter fans. Now there's finally a board game that lets players win points using the magical vocabulary made famous by the Harry Potter books and movies. SCRABBLE: World of Harry Potter from USAopoly is a new edition of Scrabble that recognizes characters, place names, spells, and potions from J.K. Rowling's Wizarding World.

Like traditional Scrabble, players use the letter tiles they pick up to spell out words on the board, with different words earning different point values. Any word you can find in an up-to-date Merriam-Webster Dictionary is still fair game, but in this version, terms coined in Harry Potter qualify as well. First and last names, whether they belong to characters (Albus or Dumbledore, for example) or actors from the franchise (Emma or Watson), are playable. You can also spell magical place names (like Hogsmeade), spells (accio), and objects (snitch).

Harry Potter version of Scrabble.
USAopoly

Showing off the depth of your Harry Potter knowledge isn't the only reason to put wizarding words on the board. Magical words are worth bonus points, with players earning more points the longer the word is. SCRABBLE: World of Harry Potter also includes cards with special challenges for players—a feature that can't be found in any other version of the game.

This Harry Potter edition of Scrabble will be available for $30 at Barnes & Noble and other retailers this spring. Until then, there are plenty of Harry Potter-themed games, including wizarding chess, out there for you to play.

Harry Potter version of Scrabble.
USAopoly

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