Use this Infographic to Build Your Own Iron Throne

Want to build your very own Iron Throne? Then set aside a lot of time. According to professional swordsmith Jake Powning, forging the 1000 swords that make up Westeros' Iron Throne could take around 700,000 hours—or about 80 years—using modern-day welding techniques. The infographic below shows how it might be done.

The first step is getting the right tools. Powning—who forges original swords as well as period replicas—says that plenty of a variety of welding equipment and forging tools would be needed to make all of those swords.

Giving yourself time to use the equipment—and not being afraid to make mistakes—are also a key part of the process. “There are a lot of things that can go wrong when you’re undertaking the many steps that add up to making a sword," Powning says. "Each time a blade breaks from being too hard or a casting fails, losing weeks of work, or you crack the beautiful grip you spent a month carving, it’s a chance to learn, but it’s okay to cry a little before you go on.”

The Targaryens used a dragon to weld the swords together in the shape of a throne, but you'll have to make do with more realistic equipment. “Welding the throne together would be a job in itself,” Powning says. “But once you had the swords, a good architectural blacksmith with a few assistants, a forge and a MIG welder could assemble a throne in a few hundred hours’ work.”

The new season of Game of Thrones starts April 6. You probably won't be able to catch this particular season from your very own Iron Throne, but you might finish in enough time to read the next book in the series.

Saul Loeb, AFP/Getty Images
The World's Best Scrunchies Are From Zurich. Ruth Bader Ginsburg Says So.
Saul Loeb, AFP/Getty Images
Saul Loeb, AFP/Getty Images

The scrunchie is back in fashion, but for some, the hair accessory never went away. That includes Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Supreme Court justice and pop culture heavyweight long known for her lacy collars and fancy jabots.

Ginsburg's longtime scrunchie look has gone underappreciated for years, but now, The Wall Street Journal reports (as we saw in The Hollywood Reporter) that her collection of the grandiose hair accessory is growing almost as large as her stockpile of trademark collars.

Where does a Supreme Court justice get her scrunchies, you ask? As you might expect, Justice Ginsburg doesn't run down to Claire's or Urban Outfitters for her hair ties. RBG fans trying to copy her look will need to grab their passports and buy a plane ticket to do so.

"My best scrunchies come from Zurich," she told The Wall Street Journal, no doubt sending a certain type of fashion-loving law student off to research flight prices to Switzerland. "Next best, London," she decreed, "and third best, Rome." (Do we think the justice pays $195 for her luxury scrunchies?)

Ginsburg—whose other trademark accessories include a purse-sized copy of the Constitution, which she carries everywhere—may not be single-handedly bringing back the '90s fashion trend, but she's certainly a great argument for the fluffy fabric hair ties being the perfect professional look. If it's good enough for the Supreme Court and visits to Congress, it's definitely good enough for the cubicle.

[h/t The Hollywood Reporter]

Fictional Place Names Are Popping Up On Road Signs in Didcot, England

Driving along the highway in Didcot, England, you may notice something strange: the road signs point the way to places like Neverland and Middle-earth.

The names of these and other fictional locales from literature were seamlessly added to road signs by an artist/prankster using Transport Medium, the official font of British road signs.

After some sleuthing, BBC News found the man responsible, who spoke to the outlet on the condition of anonymity. He told the BBC that he's been orchestrating "creative interventions" all over England for about 20 years under different pseudonyms, and that this project was a reaction to Didcot being labeled "the most normal town in England" in 2017, which rubbed him the wrong way. "To me there's nowhere that's normal, there's no such thing, but I thought I'd have a go at changing people's perceptions of Didcot," he said of the town, which he describes as a "fun" and "funky" place.

Oxfordshire County Council isn't laughing; it told the BBC that although the signs were "on the surface amusing," they were "vandalism" and potentially dangerous, since it would be hard for a driver who spotted one not to do a double take while their eyes were supposed to be on the road. Even so, thanks to routine council matters, the signs are safe—at least for now—as the Council says that it is prioritizing fixing potholes at the moment.

Jackie Billington, Didcot's mayor, recognizes that the signs have an upside. "If you speak to the majority of people in Didcot they're of the same opinion: it's put Didcot on the map again," he told BBC News. "Hopefully they'll be up for a couple of weeks."

There are five altered signs in total. If you fancy a visit to the Emerald City, you're pointed toward Sutton Courtenay. Narnia neighbors a power station. And Gotham City is on the same route as Oxford and Newbury (and not, apparently, in New Jersey, as DC Comics would have you believe). If you want to go see the signs for yourself before they disappear, you'll find them along the A4130 to Wallingford.

See the signs here and in the video below.

[h/t BBC News]


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