Wikipedia Is Digitally 'Preserving' Items Destroyed in the Brazil National Museum Fire

One guest-submitted photo of museum artifacts.
One guest-submitted photo of museum artifacts.
Jonas de Carvalho, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 2.0

Up to 20 million artifacts are thought to have been destroyed in a fire that ravaged Brazil’s National Museum in Rio de Janeiro last week. While those priceless items can never be recovered, Wikipedia is doing its part to preserve their memory in an online museum of sorts.

The online encyclopedia has made a public plea for crowdsourced photos of objects from the museum, Open Culture reports. In response, thousands of photos of colorful moths, Egyptian mummies, ancient masks, and more have been uploaded to the online archive, which you can view here.

“We’re asking people everywhere to join our global community and help the world recover from this collective tragedy,” Katherine Maher, executive director of the Wikimedia Foundation, wrote of the project.

The building housing the National Museum (Museu Nacional in Portuguese) had been crumbling following massive cuts in government funding, which left it without sprinklers or fire protection systems. It was still an important and beloved institution, though. As Brazil’s oldest museum and Latin America’s largest natural history museum, it contained important historical objects like dinosaur skeletons, Greek vases, audio files of extinct languages, and an 11,500-year-old human skull.

While user-submitted photos are helping to preserve history, few of the photos have any information or description attached to them. Scholars and knowledgeable Wikipedia editors will be needed to fill in the blanks. A group of local students are organizing similar crowdfunding efforts, and other organizations like National Geographic and UNESCO have pledged their support for museum restoration efforts.

[h/t Open Culture]

9 Vintage Thanksgiving Side Dishes We Shouldn’t Bring Back

We all have that aunt—the one who’s been bringing her Miracle-Whip-bound pimiento-pea salad to Thanksgiving dinner since time immemorial. Although you may swear she got her recipe straight from the devil, it turns out that cheese-and-lime-Jell-O salads and their ilk were all the rage in her day. So it’s not (totally) her fault! To cut her a little slack, here are some examples of vintage Thanksgiving-themed recipes that will make her salad look like a perfectly golden-brown turkey.

1. CRANBERRY CANDLE SALAD

Best Foods Mayonnaise Ad 1960s with Jello Molds

Nothing complements the tart, refreshing flavor of cranberry sauce like some gelatin and salty, eggy mayonnaise. If that weren’t weird enough, this recipe also tells you to shove a real candle in there and then light it. Ostensibly, you’re supposed to eat around the melted wax, but we can’t be sure—maybe it’s considered a condiment.

2. CANDIED SWEET POTATOES WITH ANGOSTURA BITTERS

This recipe for candied sweet potatoes, which involves baking them in a mixture of butter, sugar, and angostura bitters, is probably either really good or really bad. It sort of makes sense, adding bitters to cut down on the sugar factor. Alternatively, you could just not make a candied version of something that already has the word sweet in its name.

3. CREAMED ONIONS

This once-popular Thanksgiving mainstay has been neglected over the last century, for perhaps obvious reasons. In some households, the idea was to pour creamed onions over the turkey, like gravy, to add a little moisture. Or possibly because eating a chunky mouthful of pearl onions and cream sauce by itself is gross.

4. TURKEY AND STUFFING ON JELL-O

Thanksgiving Jello Ad

There’s not much to this one, is there? It’s a pile of turkey and stuffing dumped on top of a cranberry orange Jell-O ring—sounds delicious!

5. WINTER CORN

This mixture of corn, sour cream, and bacon is sometimes found on Midwestern Thanksgiving tables. It’s mostly off-putting because its main ingredient is creamed corn. That said, creamed corn really needs all the help it can get, so adding bacon can only improve it.

6. SWEET AND SOUR TANG POPCORN (A.K.A. ASTRONAUT POPCORN)

Reportedly, this was a popular Thanksgiving dessert in the ’70s. The idea seems to be an offshoot of caramel corn, but … with Tang powder.

7. HOT DR. PEPPER

You gotta give the good folks at Dr. Pepper a few points for at least trying here. They noticed that soda was not often considered a cozy, comforting holiday drink, and they stepped up to the bat undaunted. Bold move.

8. FROZEN JELLIED TURKEY-VEGETABLE SALAD

There’s only one way to improve a dish as alluring as Jellied Turkey-Vegetable Salad, and that’s to stick it in the freezer. From the sound of the recipe—which combines cream of celery soup, salad dressing, diced turkey, vegetables, and gelatin—this is basically the inside of a turkey pot pie if it was served frozen. And also if it was square.

9. JELL-O FRUIT CORNUCOPIA

Sure, cornucopias were for holding food in olden times, but don’t you wish you could eat one? Well, guess what—your years of longing are finally over, because someone has made a Jell-O version of one with fruit trapped in it. You don’t even have to take the fruit out of the cornucopia this time—you can just pop the whole thing in your mouth. Dreams do come true.

Can You Match the Disease to Its Olde Tyme Name?

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