Mr. Men's Newest Doctor Who Book Will Regenerate Into a Little Miss Title for the Thirteenth Doctor

'Dr. Thirteenth' book
Penguin

In 2016, inspired by a growing number of fan art collections that depicted characters from Doctor Who drawn in the style of Roger Hargreaves’s beloved Mr. Men book series, the BBC saw an opportunity and jumped on it. Partnering with Sanrio, the network—which has been broadcasting the iconic sci-fi series since it first debuted in 1963—announced a new 12-part Mr. Men series, one for every Time Lord who had headed up the television series. Now, with Jodie Whittaker set to make her debut as the Thirteenth Doctor on October 7, the book series is getting ready to add its first Little Miss title to the lineup with Doctor Thirteenth.

Penguin, the book’s publisher, describes the book as a “fabulous mashup of the fantastical storytelling of Doctor Who and the whimsical humor of Roger Hargreaves,” and promises that “the book will to appeal to fans of both iconic brands!” Not much is known about the plot of the book, but here’s the official description:

“An all-new Doctor Who adventure featuring the Thirteenth—and first female!—Doctor reimagined in the style of Roger Hargreaves. The Doctor, Graham, and Ryan try and come up with a fabulous surprise for Yaz on her birthday. And what an explosive surprise it is …”

If you’re wondering: “Wait—Graham, Ryan, and Yaz?” They’re the Thirteenth Doctor’s new companions/pals.

While you’ll have to wait until November to get your copy of Doctor Thirteenth, the series’s first 12 installments, which were written and illustrated by Adam Hargreaves (Roger’s son), have already arrived in bookstores. (You can even buy a box set of the first eight titles.)

If you’re looking for yet another way to while away the days until Whittaker takes over the TARDIS, BBC America is kicking off a 13-day Doctor Who marathon at 6 a.m. ET/PT on Tuesday, September 25 with “Rose,” the first episode of the series’s reboot. The network will air every episode from the past 10 seasons, meaning that you can relive every moment of Christopher Eccleston, David Tennant, Matt Smith, and Peter Capaldi’s time as a Time Lord—all leading up to Whittaker’s grand debut.

A ‘Book Ripper’ in Herne Bay, England Is Ripping Book Pages, Then Putting Them Back on Shelves

demaerre/iStock via Getty Images
demaerre/iStock via Getty Images

Herne Bay, a town about 60 miles east of London, has fallen prey to a new kind of ripper. According to The Guardian, a criminal known as the “Book Ripper” has torn pages within about 100 books in a charity bookstore before placing them back on shelves.

“I’m trying not to be too Sherlock Holmes about it,” Ryan Campbell, chief executive of the charity Demelza, told The Guardian, “but if there’s such a thing as a quite distinctive rip, well, he or she rips the page in half horizontally and sometimes removes half the page.”

Though it’s not the most efficient way to ruin a reading experience, since the pages themselves are still legible as long as they’re left in the book, it’s still devastating to a shop that relies on the generosity of others to serve the underprivileged.

“Of course people donate these books towards the care of children with terminal illness so it’s almost like taking the collection box,” Campbell said.

Since the occasional torn page in a secondhand bookshop isn’t uncommon, booksellers didn’t immediately realize the scope of the issue, but they believe it's been happening for a few months. The Book Ripper targets bookshelves that can’t be seen from the register, and has a favorite genre to vandalize: true crime.

The local library has also reported the same pattern of damage in some of their volumes, and police are now monitoring the situation in both places.

Townspeople are monitoring the situation, too, patrolling bookstores and libraries hoping to apprehend the culprit.

“I’m a little worried about the person,” Campbell said. “It makes you think a little bit about who’s doing this and why they feel the need to do it and what’s going on in their lives.”

[h/t The Guardian]

George R.R. Martin Says Game of Thrones Backlash Won't Influence His Books

Amy Sussman, Getty Images
Amy Sussman, Getty Images

Apparently, no one is immune to fans' negative reaction to Game of Thrones's final season—not even A Song of Ice and Fire author George R.R. Martin. In an interview with Entertainment Weekly, Martin spoke about the overwhelming power of the internet, and how easily it can influence a writer's process. The author said:

"The internet affects [writing] to a degree it was never affected before. Like Jon Snow’s parentage. There were early hints about [who Snow’s parents were] in the books, but only one reader in 100 put it together. And before the internet that was fine—for 99 readers out of 100 when Jon Snow’s parentage gets revealed it would be, ‘Oh, that’s a great twist!’ But in the age of the internet, even if only one person in 100 figures it out then that one person posts it online and the other 99 people read it and go, ‘Oh, that makes sense.’ Suddenly the twist you’re building towards is out there. And there is a temptation to then change it [in the upcoming books]—‘Oh my god, it’s screwed up, I have to come up with something different.’ But that’s wrong. Because you’ve been planning for a certain ending and if you suddenly change direction just because somebody figured it out, or because they don’t like it, then it screws up the whole structure."

Because the temptation can be there, Martin said that he doesn't go digging for fan reactions or theories. "I don’t read the fan sites," he said. "I want to write the book I’ve always intended to write all along. And when it comes out they can like it or they can not like it." For Martin, the same holds true for the way people felt about Game of Thrones as well. While Martin has watched the final season, he isn’t letting any of the events of the series change the way he has always planned to conclude his book series.

"The whole last three years have been strange since the show got ahead of the books,” Martin said. “Yes, I told [showrunners David Benioff and Dan Weiss] a number of things years ago. And some of them they did do. But at the same time, it’s different. I have very fixed ideas in my head as I’m writing The Winds of Winter and beyond that in terms of where things are going. It’s like two alternate realities existing side by side. I have to double down and do my version of it which is what I’ve been doing.”

While fans are getting restless for the final books, Martin is teaching his readers an important lesson in patience—one that many people believe HBO’s showrunners could have benefited from: art cannot be rushed. Let’s hope people are happier with Martin's conclusion than they were with the TV show’s.

[h/t Entertainment Weekly]

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