This Interactive Family Tree Shows How Europe's Monarchs Are Related

Royals from Norway, Denmark, Belgium, Monaco, and elsewhere gathered at the 2010 wedding of Crown Princess Victoria of Sweden.
Royals from Norway, Denmark, Belgium, Monaco, and elsewhere gathered at the 2010 wedding of Crown Princess Victoria of Sweden.
Jonas Ekstromer-Pool, Getty Images

Thanks to a history of intermarriage, Europe's royal families are all tied to each other in some way. For instance, Queen Elizabeth II is third cousins with most of Europe’s monarchs, including Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden, Margrethe II of Denmark, and former Belgian ruler Albert II. To explore how the monarchies are connected, Expedia created an interactive family tree that lets you see the ties between different royals. While the feature is geared toward exploring the family ties of Nordic royalty, since European monarchs are basically all related, just about everyone appears on the same family tree eventually.

Royally Connected by Expedia.se

To expand the tree and explore different monarchs' ancestry, click the plus signs above their photos. The crowns indicate that the person is a ruling monarch, while the interlocking circles indicate a marriage. Each graphic is color-coded to show whether the royals are related to the monarchies of Norway, Denmark, Sweden, or another country. Clicking on each face brings up a window with pertinent information on each royal, like their title and their heritage. (Though he is the king of Sweden, Carl XVI Gustaf, for instance, is 70 percent German, 10 percent French, and 20 percent British.)

The tree goes back to the Victorian era—to Victoria herself, in fact, as Carl XVI Gustaf is the great-great-grandson of the long-ruling British monarch. Victoria's granddaughter, Margaret of Connaught, married Sweden's Gustaf VI Adolf in 1905. They had Gustaf Adolf, father of the current king, in 1906. Carl XVI Gustaf's mother, Sibylla, was also a great-grandchild of Victoria's, descended from her youngest son, Prince Leopold, but unfortunately, the family tree doesn't let you explore her line.

Still confused? Navigate the graphic yourself above, or visit the full version on Expedia's website.

9 Vintage Thanksgiving Side Dishes We Shouldn’t Bring Back

We all have that aunt—the one who’s been bringing her Miracle-Whip-bound pimiento-pea salad to Thanksgiving dinner since time immemorial. Although you may swear she got her recipe straight from the devil, it turns out that cheese-and-lime-Jell-O salads and their ilk were all the rage in her day. So it’s not (totally) her fault! To cut her a little slack, here are some examples of vintage Thanksgiving-themed recipes that will make her salad look like a perfectly golden-brown turkey.

1. CRANBERRY CANDLE SALAD

Best Foods Mayonnaise Ad 1960s with Jello Molds

Nothing complements the tart, refreshing flavor of cranberry sauce like some gelatin and salty, eggy mayonnaise. If that weren’t weird enough, this recipe also tells you to shove a real candle in there and then light it. Ostensibly, you’re supposed to eat around the melted wax, but we can’t be sure—maybe it’s considered a condiment.

2. CANDIED SWEET POTATOES WITH ANGOSTURA BITTERS

This recipe for candied sweet potatoes, which involves baking them in a mixture of butter, sugar, and angostura bitters, is probably either really good or really bad. It sort of makes sense, adding bitters to cut down on the sugar factor. Alternatively, you could just not make a candied version of something that already has the word sweet in its name.

3. CREAMED ONIONS

This once-popular Thanksgiving mainstay has been neglected over the last century, for perhaps obvious reasons. In some households, the idea was to pour creamed onions over the turkey, like gravy, to add a little moisture. Or possibly because eating a chunky mouthful of pearl onions and cream sauce by itself is gross.

4. TURKEY AND STUFFING ON JELL-O

Thanksgiving Jello Ad

There’s not much to this one, is there? It’s a pile of turkey and stuffing dumped on top of a cranberry orange Jell-O ring—sounds delicious!

5. WINTER CORN

This mixture of corn, sour cream, and bacon is sometimes found on Midwestern Thanksgiving tables. It’s mostly off-putting because its main ingredient is creamed corn. That said, creamed corn really needs all the help it can get, so adding bacon can only improve it.

6. SWEET AND SOUR TANG POPCORN (A.K.A. ASTRONAUT POPCORN)

Reportedly, this was a popular Thanksgiving dessert in the ’70s. The idea seems to be an offshoot of caramel corn, but … with Tang powder.

7. HOT DR. PEPPER

You gotta give the good folks at Dr. Pepper a few points for at least trying here. They noticed that soda was not often considered a cozy, comforting holiday drink, and they stepped up to the bat undaunted. Bold move.

8. FROZEN JELLIED TURKEY-VEGETABLE SALAD

There’s only one way to improve a dish as alluring as Jellied Turkey-Vegetable Salad, and that’s to stick it in the freezer. From the sound of the recipe—which combines cream of celery soup, salad dressing, diced turkey, vegetables, and gelatin—this is basically the inside of a turkey pot pie if it was served frozen. And also if it was square.

9. JELL-O FRUIT CORNUCOPIA

Sure, cornucopias were for holding food in olden times, but don’t you wish you could eat one? Well, guess what—your years of longing are finally over, because someone has made a Jell-O version of one with fruit trapped in it. You don’t even have to take the fruit out of the cornucopia this time—you can just pop the whole thing in your mouth. Dreams do come true.

Can You Match the Disease to Its Olde Tyme Name?

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