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Tradd Moore/Marvel Comics

The Most Interesting Comics of the Week

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Tradd Moore/Marvel Comics

Every Wednesday, I highlight the most interesting new comics hitting comic shops, bookstores, Comixology, Kickstarter, and the web. These are not necessarily reviews insomuch as they are me pointing out new comics that are noteworthy for one reason or another. Feel free to comment below if there's a comic you've read recently that you want to talk about or an upcoming comic that you'd like me to consider highlighting.

1. All-New Ghost Rider #1

Written by Felipe Smith; art by Tradd Moore
Marvel Comics

Marvel Comics is currently launching and relaunching a slew of books each week. Some—like this week's Daredevil #1—are simply a numbering reset in order to give readers an easy place to start. Others, like the new Ms. Marvel or this week's All-New Ghost Rider, are an effort to rethink lower tier characters and make them more relevant for today's audiences. It must be said that Marvel is doing a much better job at this these days than their competitor, DC. Marvel is also doing a great job of recruiting up-and-coming talent and giving them as close to free creative license as a major corporation is apt to give.

Felipe Smith and Tradd Moore—who have shown unique voices on smaller independent comics like Smith's Peepo Choo and Moore's Luther Strode—have designed a brand new Ghost Rider. He won't be replacing previous characters like Johnny Blaze and Danny Ketch, but will co-exist in the same universe.

The key difference for this new Ghost Rider? He drives a car rather than a motorcycle.

Smith and Moore have done a lot of thinking about character design (you can see some of the sketches here), moving from the old look of leather-clad motorcycle gangs and heavy metal music to the new aesthetic of souped up muscle cars and electronic music. The old flaming skull is now made of white chrome with a hot-rod style blower in the forehead that emits flames. The heavy leather jacket and chains have been replaced with a sleek jumpsuit, and underneath it all is Robbie Reyes, a young Latino-American gear head from East L.A. (He is reportedly modeled after One Direction band member Zayn Malik who will be the obvious choice for a future reboot of the Nicolas Cage movie franchise.)

Here's an unlettered preview of a few pages from the first issue of All-New Ghost Rider.

Update: All New Ghost Rider #1 was delayed at the last minute and won't be in stores until next week, but it was too late to bump it from this week's list.

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2. Cannon

By Wallace Wood
Fantagraphics

Wally Wood was one of the great comic book draftsmen of the mid 20th century. He was known for his work on the early days of Mad Magazine and for his sci-fi, horror, and war stories for EC Comics and Warren Publishing. From 1970 to 1973, Wood (a WWII veteran) produced a weekly newspaper-style strip called Cannon that was published in Overseas Weekly and distributed exclusively to servicemen stationed at foreign bases. It's a macho spy comic about a super-competent tough guy named John Cannon who had been brainwashed by the Chinese and then re-brainwashed by the Americans. He is sent off on Cold War-era missions that put him in the path of the Chinese, the Soviets, and South American dictators. The plots are fast-paced and fun, but don't go more than a handful of panels before a woman ends up in some state of undress.

Cannon reads like it was written by a hormone-crazed thirteen-year-old boy, but is obviously designed to appeal to its target audience of young soldiers eager for some tough-guy action and voluptuous figures to ogle; it's James Bond with no restrictions or shame. Cannon is at times misogynist and offensive, although it doesn't quite veer into the pornographic territory that Wood explored in some of his later works.

Although he oversaw a studio of artists on this comic, his classic approach to storytelling and craft is a wonder to behold in this new hardcover collection from Fantagraphics. In addition to a foreword from one of those studio artists, Howard Chaykin, there is additional content including the full color short Cannon comic Wood self-published in 1969 with art by Steve Ditko.

Check out a preview here, but if you didn't get the idea from the writeup above, be aware that it is NSFW. Below is just about the only SFW page I could find.

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3. Hellboy: The First 20 Years

By Mike Mignola
Dark Horse Comics

This week is "Hellboy Week," as Mike Mignola celebrates the 20th anniversary of his signature first comic. To commemorate, Mignola and longtime editor (and writer on other 'Mignolaverse' projects like Abe Sapien) handpicked pinups, page art and sketches to fill this new hardcover collection, Hellboy: The First 20 Years.

This serves as an inspiring milestone for supporters of creator-owned comics. Mignola built a whole world around what initially seemed like a simple idea for a character. It has spawned a multitude of comics, not to mention prose novels and two successful feature films. The new Mignola-drawn series Hellboy in Hell and primary companion book B.P.R.D. are still going strong today, which is an inspiration to creators hoping to achieve similar success with their own characters and ideas.

Hellboy: The First 20 Years starts with the very first drawing of Hellboy (unrecognizable from what we know of the character now) and brings us right up to present time, displaying full color art from various Hellboy comics.

Some sample images are available in this preview on the Dark Horse Comics website.

Mental Floss will have an interview with Mike Mignola about his 20 years working on Hellboy later this week.

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4. American Vampire: Second Cycle #1

Written by Scott Snyder; art by Rafael Albuquerque
DC Vertigo

Scott Snyder rose to stardom writing the American Vampire series, which began in 2010. It went on hiatus in 2013 when Snyder became one of DC's premier writers and needed some time off to catch up. Now, with the series at its halfway point, Snyder and regular artist Rafael Albuquerque are ready to resume the final 30 or so issues.

American Vampire tells the story of two immortal vampires, Skinner Sweet and Pearl Jones. Sweet's tale begins in the late 1800s in the American West. He meets Pearl in the 1920s and turns her into a new breed of vampire, more powerful than their European counterparts. Second Cycle picks up with the two in the year 1965.

Although it's a continuation of the original series, Second Cycle restarts its numbering in order to provide a jumping-on point for new readers.

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5. Schmuck

By Seth Kushner with various artists
Kickstarter

Seth Kushner is a photographer who is perhaps best known to the comics world for his portraits of comic book artists and writers which became a collection called Leaping Tall Buildings. For the past six years, he has been writing his first graphic novel, a semi-autobiographical comic called Schmuck. Based on his own experiences, Schmuck follows the dating exploits of a 20-something New York photographer struggling to find out what he wants. It's for mature readers, as some of the depictions of dating life get explicit. Kushner seems to be going for a storytelling vibe that is a bit Harvey Pekar meets Bob Fingerman meets Larry David.

To publish his first book, Kushner has set up a new company called Hang Dai Editions with cartoonist partners Gregory Benton, Dean Haspiel, and Josh Neufeld. They've just started a Kickstarter campaign to fund the printing of the book. Kushner's experience in putting out high-quality photography books means he's striving to make as beautiful a book as possible. He's brought in Eric Skillman—an award-winning designer who has created DVD packages for the Criterion Collection as well as his own graphic novel, Liar's Kiss—to design this book.

Kushner has also found 22 collaborators to help bring his anecdotal stories alive. The list of cartoonists includes plenty of newcomers but also some established pros like Dean Haspiel, Nick Bertozzi, and Bobby Timony. They have been serializing installments of Schmuck as a webcomic on Brooklyn-based Trip City, but the print edition will include plenty of previously unseen material. Also, the Kickstarter edition will have an exclusive Dean Haspiel cover.

Check out the Kickstarter which just launched this week.

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6. Black Roles For White Actors

By Keith Knight
The Nib

I really liked Keith Knight's recent contribution to The Nib on Medium.com, "Black Roles For White Actors," a reaction to racist online furor over the casting of black actors for the upcoming Annie and Fantastic Four movies. 

The Nib, an editorial cartooning hub started and edited by Matt Bors has grown substantially and is the place to find smart and opinionated cartooning online.

Read all of Keith Knight's cartoon here.

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iStock
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Pop Culture
5 Bizarre Comic-Con News Stories from Years Past
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iStock

At its best, Comic-Con is a friendly place where like-minded people can celebrate their pop culture obsessions, and each other. And no one can make fun of you, no matter how lazy your cosplaying might be. You might think that at its worst, it’s just a series of long lines of costumed fans and small stores crammed into a convention center. But sometimes, throwing together 100,000-plus people from around the world in what feels like a carnival-type atmosphere where anything goes can have less than stellar results. Here are some highlights from past Comic-Con-tastrophes.

1. MAN IN HARRY POTTER T-SHIRT STABS ANOTHER MAN IN THE FACE—WITH A PEN

In 2010, two men waiting for a Comic-Con screening of the Seth Rogen alien comedy Paul got into a very adult argument about whether one of them was sitting too close to the other. Unable to come to a satisfactory conclusion with words, one man stabbed the other in the face with a pen. According to CNN, the attacker was led away wearing handcuffs and a Harry Potter T-shirt. In the aftermath, some Comic-Con attendees dealt with the attack in an oddly fitting way: They cosplayed as the victim, with pens protruding from bloody eye sockets.

2. MEMORABILIA THIEVES INVADE NEW YORK

Since its founding in 2006, New York Comic Con has attracted a few sticky-fingered attendees. In 2010, a man stole several rare comics from vendor Matt Nelson, co-founder of Texas’ Worldwide Comics. Just one of those, Whiz Comics No. 1, was worth $11,000, according to the New York Post. A few years later, in 2014, someone stole a $2000 “Dunny” action figure, which artist Jon-Paul Kaiser had painted during the event for Clutter magazine. And those are just the incidents that involved police; lower-scale cases of toys and comics disappearing from booths are an increasingly frustrating epidemic, according to some. “Comic Con theft is an issue we all sort of ignore,” collector Tracy Isenhour wrote on the blog of his company, Needless Essentials, in 2015. “I am here to tell you no more. It’s time for this garbage to stop."

3. CATWOMAN SAVES THE DAY

John Sciulli/Getty Images for Xbox

Adrianne Curry, winner of the first cycle of America’s Next Top Model, has made a career of chasing viral fame. Ironically, it was at Comic-Con in 2014 that Curry did something truly worthy of attention—though there wasn’t a camera in sight. Dressed as Catwoman, she was posing with fans alongside her friend Alicia Marie, who was dressed as Tigra. According to a Facebook post Marie wrote at the time, a fan tried to shove his hands into her bikini bottoms. She screamed, the man ran off, and Curry jumped to action. She “literally took off after dude WITH her Catwoman whip and chased him down, beat his a**,” Marie wrote. “Punched him across the face with the butt of her whip—he had zombie blood on his face—got on her costume.”

4. MAN POSES AS FUGITIVE-SEEKING INVESTIGATOR TO GET INTO VIP ROOM

The lines at Comic-Con are legendary, so one Utah man came up with a novel way to try and skip them altogether. In 2015, Jonathon M. Wall tried to get into Salt Lake Comic Con’s exclusive VIP enclave (normally a $10,000 ticket) by claiming he was an agent with the Air Force Office of Special Investigations, and needed to get into the VIP room “to catch a fugitive,” according to The San Diego Union Tribune. Not only does that story not even come close to making sense, it also adds up to impersonating a federal agent, a crime to which Wall pleaded guilty in April of this year and which carried a sentence of up to three years in prison and a $250,000 fine. In June, prosecutors announced that they were planning to reduce his crime from a felony to a misdemeanor.

5. MAN WALKS 645 MILES TO COMIC-CON, DRESSED AS A STORMTROOPER, TO HONOR HIS LATE WIFE

Michael Buckner/Getty Images for Disney

In 2015, Kevin Doyle walked 645 miles along the California coast to honor his late wife, Eileen. Doyle had met Eileen relatively late in life, when he was in his 50s, and they bonded over their shared love of Star Wars (he even proposed to her while dressed as Darth Vader). However, she died of cancer barely a year after they were married. Adrift and lonely, Doyle decided to honor her memory and their love of Star Wars by walking to Comic-Con—from San Francisco. “I feel like I’m so much better in the healing process than if I’d stayed home,” he told The San Diego Union Tribune.

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Funko
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Pop Culture
Funko Is Bringing a Ton of Old-School Hanna-Barbera Characters to Comic-Con
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Funko

Long before The Simpsons or SpongeBob SquarePants dominated the airwaves, classic Hanna-Barbera cartoons like Wacky Races, Scooby-Doo, and The Huckleberry Hound Show reigned supreme. Now, some of the American animation studio’s most nostalgic characters are getting the Funko treatment.

As Nerdist reports, the toy manufacturer is launching a pop-up store at Comic-Con International, which runs this year from July 20 through July 23 at the San Diego Convention Center. The Get Animated! Pop!-Up Shop will sell exclusive models of Hanna-Barbera characters that fans can't purchase anywhere else.

For Wacky Races aficionados, there's a Big Gruesome model, two Rufus Ruffcut figurines (both of which come with a tiny Sawtooth), and two Peter Perfect models, one of which includes the notoriously rickety Turbo Terrific drag racer.

A Funko figurine of Big Gruesome from the Hanna-Barbera cartoon
Funko

A Funko figurine of Rufus Ruffcut from the Hanna-Barbera cartoon “Wacky Races.”
Funko

A Funko figurine of Rufus Ruffcut from the Hanna-Barbera cartoon “Wacky Races.”
Funko

A Funko figurine of Peter Perfect from the Hanna-Barbera cartoon “Wacky Races.”
Funko

Scooby-Doo comes in three colors, including green, pink, and blue.

A Funko figurine of a green Scooby-Doo.
Funko

A Funko figurine of a pink Scooby-Doo.
Funko

A Funko figurine of a blue Scooby-Doo.
Funko

Funko also pays tribute to The Jetsons and Huckleberry Hound, with the beloved blue dog getting his own Pop! Animation eight-pack (each dog has a different outfit) and Rosie the Robot getting her own Pop! Animation three-pack.

A “Huckleberry Hound” Funko Pop! Animation 8-pack
Funko

“The Jetsons” Funko Pop! Animation 8-pack of Rosie the Robot
Funko

You can view the full round-up over at Nerdist, or by visiting Funko's blog.

[h/t Nerdist]

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