Thousands of Rare Insects and Lizards Have Been Stolen From a Philadelphia Museum

A Mexican fireleg tarantula
A Mexican fireleg tarantula
Mike Baird, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

A Philadelphia museum has been hit in a nefarious heist, and in this case, you probably don’t want to be the one who finds the stolen goods. Some 7000 insects, arachnids, and lizards (80 different species in all) have been stolen from the Philadelphia Insectarium and Butterfly Pavilion, according to The New York Times, and no one knows where the majority of those roaches, tarantulas, geckos, and other crawling creatures are. According to the museum's CEO, John Cambridge, it's the largest live insect heist in history.

Cockroaches and other creatures crawl on a man.
John Cambridge in the insectarium
Philadelphia Insectarium and Butterfly Pavilion

Police have pointed to three current or former employees of the insectarium as the likely perpetrators, but several aspects of the heist are still unclear, including what day it took place. John Cambridge, the head of the insectarium, said the theft occurred on August 22, but also may have taken place over several days. The creatures are often moved from their displays for various reasons, like to be taken to educational programs, so the crime didn’t become apparent immediately, Cambridge told Gizmodo.

Security footage showed people leaving the museum with plastic containers holding the creepy cargo, which are worth an estimated $40,000 or more altogether. Oddly, the thieves also nailed two uniforms to the wall of the museum’s back storage room with knives.

Two blue uniforms stuck into a wall with knives
Philadelphia Insectarium and Butterfly Pavilion

The missing animals make up somewhere around 80 to 90 percent of the insectarium’s collection. Entire colonies of roaches were taken in the theft, as were numerous endangered species. (None of the butterflies were taken.) A few of the stolen creatures have been returned by police, including a Mexican fireleg tarantula, but most remain missing. That list of includes a six-eyed sand spider, a reclusive, extremely venomous arachnid native to southern Africa. "I’m not hopeful to get these critters back at this point,” Cambridge told Mental Floss. “I’m under the impression that they’ve probably already sold a good number of them.”

For now, the insectarium has closed down its second and third floors while it rebuilds its collection and displays. Cambridge has also set up a GoFundMe page to raise money in the wake of the thefts. “I am determined to learn from this experience and then build a bigger and cooler place,” he says, adding that the insectarium has already received a number of donations of critters from across the country.

[h/t MNN]

Disney CEO Says Star Wars Fans Should 'Expect Some Slowdown'

Jonathan Olley, Lucasfilm Ltd.
Jonathan Olley, Lucasfilm Ltd.

by Dana Samuel

When Disney bought Lucasfilm six years ago, it's almost as though the Star Wars franchise shifted into overdrive with production, releasing four films in just three years.

Starting with the release of Star Wars: The Force Awakens in 2015, next came Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016), Star Wars: The Last Jedi (2017), and most recently, Solo: A Star Wars Story (2018). Although Star Wars fans are happy about not having to wait years in between installments, Disney CEO Bob Iger says fans should "expect some slowdown" after Episode IX's 2019 release.

While speaking to The Hollywood Reporter about the speed of Star Wars project production, Iger shared:

"I made the timing decision, and as I look back, I think the mistake that I made ... was a little too much, too fast … You can expect some slowdown, but that doesn't mean we're not going to make films. J.J. is busy making IX. We have creative entities, including David Benioff and D.B. Weiss, who are developing sagas of their own, which we haven't been specific about.”

"We are just at the point where we're going to start making decisions about what comes next," Iger continued. "But I think we're going to be a little bit more careful about volume and timing. And the buck stops here on that."

Slowdown? Just when we were getting used to this steady flow of Star Wars spectacles?

Hopefully this means that each new project will just get extra attention when it comes to production value, storyline, etc. If not, we have no doubt that fans will have a few choice words for Iger.

How Much Is Game of Thrones Author George RR Martin Worth?

Kevin Winter, Getty Images
Kevin Winter, Getty Images

by Dana Samuel

Unsurprisingly, Game of Thrones took home another Emmy Award earlier this week for Outstanding Drama Series, which marked the series' third time winning the title. Of course, George RR Martin—the author who wrote the books that inspired the TV show, and the series' executive producer—celebrated the victory alongside ​the GoT cast.

For anyone who may be unfamiliar with Martin's work, he is the author of the A Song of Ice and Fire series, which is the epic fantasy series that led to the Game of Thrones adaptation. Basically, we really we have him to thank for this seven-year roller coaster we've been on.

At 70 years old (his birthday was yesterday, September 20th), Martin has had a fairly lengthy career as an author, consisting of a number of screenplays and TV pilots before A Song of Ice and Fire, which, ​according to Daily Mail he wrote in the spirit of The Lord of the Rings.

 Cast and crew of Outstanding Drama Series winner 'Game of Thrones' pose in the press room during the 70th Emmy Awards at Microsoft Theater on September 17, 2018 in Los Angeles, California
Frazer Harrison, Getty Images

Martin sold the rights to his A Song of Ice and Fire series in 2007, and he truly owes the vast majority of his net worth to the success of his novels and the Game of Thrones TV series. So how much exactly is this acclaimed author worth? According to Daily Mail, Martin makes about $15 million annually from the TV show, and another $10 million from his successful literary works.

According to Celebrity Net Worth, that makes Martin's net worth about $65 million.

Regardless of his millions, Martin still lives a fairly modest life, and it's clear he does everything for his love of writing.

We'd like to extend a personal thank you to Martin for creating one of the most exciting and emotionally jarring storylines we've ever experienced.
We wish Game of Thrones could go ​on for 13 seasons, too!

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