Take A Look at The 40-Year Evolution of the LEGO Minifigures

A LEGO ad for the new knight minifigures from 1978
A LEGO ad for the new knight minifigures from 1978
LEGO

Anyone who ever played with LEGOs is familiar with the block company’s distinct human figures, known as minifigures, or, for short, minifigs. The block-y yellow figures are included with almost every set or you can buy some of them on their own. The block sets didn’t always come with miniature people, though. The minifigure we know and love now didn’t come about until 1978.

In honor of the minifig’s 40th birthday, LEGO shared some of the company’s earliest designs. These include the 1974 LEGO building figure, a big model made of large, square bricks that had moveable arms but stationary legs, as well as the 1975 stage extra figures, which had armless, solid torsos and no printed features. Finally, in 1978, LEGO launched the first minifigures, featuring four moveable limbs and cartoony facial expressions.

Three LEGO figures
From left: LEGO building figure (1974), stage extra (1975) and minifigure (1978)

The minifigures could have looked significantly different, though. Early prototypes show armless, gnome-like creatures with bulging eyes, ears, and noses.

Minifigure doctors
From left: two early minifigure prototypes, the first minifigure doctor, and two more recent models.

Astronaut minifigures
From left: Two early prototypes for an astronaut minifigure, the first astronaut minifigure released in 1978, and two more recent designs.

Take a look at the wide array of early designs from the 1970s.

Rows of minifigures from LEGO history

When the minifigure first came out, LEGO started with about 20 characters—including an astronaut, a police officer, a doctor, and a knight—all of which had the same black eyes and smiles. Four decades later, there are now 650 different face designs and 8000 different characters. Though they all may have different outfits and, occasionally, hair, each one of them is exactly as tall as four square LEGO bricks stacked together.

Trace the full evolution of minifigure design through the years in the infographic below.

An infographic showing the timeline of minifigure design evolution

All images courtesy LEGO

This Ultra-Comfy Travel Onesie Has an Inflatable Hood and Neck Pillow

Onepiece
Onepiece

If you’re preparing to take a 10-hour flight, you’re probably going to reach for the comfiest outfit in your closet rather than the trendiest one. So, in an effort to design the “ultimate travel apparel,” Norwegian brand Onepiece has created a unisex line of Inflatable Travel Jumpsuits—otherwise known as onesies.

The outfit, spotted by Travel + Leisure, boasts over 15 airplane-friendly features that frequent travelers will appreciate. The hood inflates to form a cushion, and a built-in neck pillow also puffs up to provide some extra support. Use the “snooze cap” to shield your eyes, and if you really want to block out all the light, you can cover your face by zipping the hood down (there’s still plenty of breathing room). Finally, to prevent any awkward contact with your neighbor while you nod off, you can strap yourself into your seat by using the sleeping mask and adjustable head stabilizer.

Different features of the onesie
Onepiece

There are also plenty of pockets. One is large enough to fit a tablet or magazine, while double-zipped kangaroo pockets are designed to protect your valuables. The pants also sport cargo pockets, and additional velcro pockets inside the chest area of the onesie can be detached and placed in a tray while you go through airport security.

Perhaps most importantly, there’s a zippered “Rear Exit Solution” on the butt of the pants, so if you need to do your business, you won’t have to get half-naked to do so.

We get that most people probably stopped wearing onesies after their seventh birthday, but the fact that the shirt and bottoms are connected is actually pretty subtle. Check out the company’s Kickstarter video below to see it being modeled, and if you’re interested in sporting this look, you have until November 12 to back the project and secure your onesie for $149.

[h/t Travel + Leisure]

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