Take A Look at The 40-Year Evolution of the LEGO Minifigures

A LEGO ad for the new knight minifigures from 1978
A LEGO ad for the new knight minifigures from 1978
LEGO

Anyone who ever played with LEGOs is familiar with the block company’s distinct human figures, known as minifigures, or, for short, minifigs. The block-y yellow figures are included with almost every set or you can buy some of them on their own. The block sets didn’t always come with miniature people, though. The minifigure we know and love now didn’t come about until 1978.

In honor of the minifig’s 40th birthday, LEGO shared some of the company’s earliest designs. These include the 1974 LEGO building figure, a big model made of large, square bricks that had moveable arms but stationary legs, as well as the 1975 stage extra figures, which had armless, solid torsos and no printed features. Finally, in 1978, LEGO launched the first minifigures, featuring four moveable limbs and cartoony facial expressions.

Three LEGO figures
From left: LEGO building figure (1974), stage extra (1975) and minifigure (1978)

The minifigures could have looked significantly different, though. Early prototypes show armless, gnome-like creatures with bulging eyes, ears, and noses.

Minifigure doctors
From left: two early minifigure prototypes, the first minifigure doctor, and two more recent models.

Astronaut minifigures
From left: Two early prototypes for an astronaut minifigure, the first astronaut minifigure released in 1978, and two more recent designs.

Take a look at the wide array of early designs from the 1970s.

Rows of minifigures from LEGO history

When the minifigure first came out, LEGO started with about 20 characters—including an astronaut, a police officer, a doctor, and a knight—all of which had the same black eyes and smiles. Four decades later, there are now 650 different face designs and 8000 different characters. Though they all may have different outfits and, occasionally, hair, each one of them is exactly as tall as four square LEGO bricks stacked together.

Trace the full evolution of minifigure design through the years in the infographic below.

An infographic showing the timeline of minifigure design evolution

All images courtesy LEGO

Now You Can Wear Your Favorite Dunkin' Coffee Flavor as Nail Polish

Dunkin'
Dunkin'

Dunkin'—the coffee chain formerly known as Dunkin' Donuts—is getting into the beauty business. For a limited time, nail polish inspired by Dunkin's flavored coffees will be available at select nail salons across the country.

The nail polish line includes eight freshly brewed shades. Three pay homage to Dunkin's new signature lattes—cocoa mocha, caramel craze, and blueberry crisp—and three are inspired by the seasonal Baskin-Robbins ice cream-flavored coffees: butter pecan, pistachio almond fudge, and banana split. Nail polishes in Dunkin's iconic pink and orange color palette are also available.

The collection is a collaboration between Dunkin' and the vegan-friendly nail polish company Lauren B. Beauty. While supplies last, the products will be available at certain nail salons in 10 cities where Dunkin' operates, including Los Angeles, Chicago, Atlanta, and Boston. Each purchase of the branded nail polish comes with a $3 Dunkin' gift card. To see if a salon in your area is participating, check out the map below.

Dunkin' isn't the first fast food chain to release its own nail polish line. In 2016, KFC released edible "finger-licking" nail polish that, yes, tasted like chicken.

Australian Family Walking Dog Named Lucky Discovers $24,000 Gold Nugget

iStock.com/scyther5
iStock.com/scyther5

An Australian dog named Lucky has lived up to his name. As the Bendigo Advertiser reports, a family from Bendigo in Victoria were walking their pet on May 12 when they literally stumbled upon a hunk of rock resembling gold on the ground. Experts have confirmed that the 20-ounce nugget is indeed gold, and in its intact state it's worth an estimated $24,000.

A father and his two daughters—who wish to remain anonymous—were taking their dog Lucky for a morning walk when one of the girls hit something with her foot. She noticed it wasn't an ordinary rock, and asked her Dad if it might be gold. He suspected it was and took their find to a nearby supermarket to weigh it on the deli scale.

Weighing over a pound, the gold nugget could earn the family a small fortune if they wish to sell it. The father says he does plan to find a buyer eventually; he had been struggling financially, and he told the Bendigo Advertiser the lucky event "couldn't be better timing."

The family has decided to keep the location of the discovery a secret. They plan to go for more walks in the area in hopes of striking gold twice.

[h/t Bendigo Advertiser]

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