'Brand New Roman' is a Fun Mashup of All the Corporate Logos You Know and Love

Hello Velocity
Hello Velocity

Brand New Roman is not your average typeface. You'll probably never find it in the drop-down menu of Microsoft Word or see it on a sign, but it's instantly recognizable. That's because each letter is based off a famous company's logo, as Digital Arts reports.

Designed by the creative agency Hello Velocity, the typeface uses a relevant logo to form letters. The a looks like the Amazon logo. The d is formed by that iconic Disney swoop. The e is the Internet Explorer logo. The w is WordPress. The k is Kellogg's. In total, Hello Velocity used 76 different corporate logos to create the typeface, so some letters are represented with multiple logos—like the s, which is represented by the Skype logo in most cases, but occasionally appears as the Suzuki logo.

The words 'Brand New Roman' spelled out using the typeface
Hello Velocity

As the cheeky website for the project explains, "Brand New Roman is the most corporate Corporate Font ever created! Now all your content can be sponsored content, and sponsored by everybody!" It's Nice That rightfully likens the result to the eye-boggling Wingdings, though this one is admittedly a lot more readable.

Street advertisements using Brand New Roman
Hello Velocity

Digital Arts points out that there's a fair chance that there might be some copyright infringement going on, so you'd better enjoy it while you can. You can download it to use on your own projects or check out the Firefox and Chrome plugins, which will turn every website you visit into a showcase for Brand New Roman.

[h/t Digital Arts]

Frank Lloyd Wright's Spiral House in Phoenix Hits the Market for $12.9 Million

Frank Lloyd Wright designed nearly 60 houses in his lifetime (and even more if you count the ones that were never built). You’ll find these iconic structures scattered throughout the U.S. Some are private homes in far-flung places, while others have been turned into museums.

One of these structures is the spiral-shaped David and Gladys Wright House in the affluent Arcadia neighborhood of Phoenix, Arizona. And if you have $12,950,000 to spare, it could be yours to keep. As Curbed reports, the home is currently up for sale via Russ Lyon Sotheby's International Realty.

The home’s distinctive shape and spiral walk-up are early examples of Wright’s rounded style, which he honed and mastered while drawing up plans for the Guggenheim Museum in New York City. The museum opened in 1959, just six months after his death.

Of course, even non-architecture aficionados would probably agree that this is a beautiful—and comfortable—home. It boasts three bedrooms, four baths, custom-designed furniture, and a roof deck overlooking Camelback Mountain. The home was constructed for and named after Wright’s son David and daughter-in-law Gladys in 1952. After their deaths, a developer bought the home and made plans to demolish it to make room for new houses in 2012.

However, another buyer—current owner Zach Rawling—stepped in and took it off the developer's hands for $2.3 million, saving it from certain death. Rawling’s plan was to donate it to the School of Architecture at Taliesin in order to preserve it, but that partnership fell through, so it’s back on the market once again.

Frank Lloyd Wright homes can be difficult to sell for a number of reasons. For one, the high asking price for these old-fashioned homes—some of which don’t have air conditioning and other modern comforts—can be hard to justify. But even if you can't cough up several million dollars for the David and Gladys Wright House, you can still scope it out via an online interactive floor plan.

[h/t Curbed]

IKEA Is Releasing a Quirky New Children's Line

IKEA
IKEA

You may know IKEA as the store that furnished your first apartment after college, but the Swedish chain offers products that appeal to all age groups. As Fast Company reports, one of their newest lines is made for kids ages 6 and up—but older customers can also appreciate the offbeat designs.

Lustigt from IKEA features toys, games, and crafts, all designed with an eye towards playfulness. There's a light-up jump rope, a weaving loom, a paint roller, and a colorful jigsaw puzzle. Channeling what it does best, IKEA has included some home goods in the collection as well, like an asymmetrical shelf and a bedspread. Other items, like a giant plush hand, defy categorization.

There's a reason the pieces look like they were lifted from the doodles of an elementary schooler. The 7-year-old daughter of designer Henrik Preutz helped with the designs, according to IKEA.

The Lustigt line won't be available online, but you can catch it in stores for a limited time when it hits IKEA shelves this October.

Children's toy.

Children's toy.

Paint roller.

Origami shapes.

[h/t Fast Company]

All images courtesy of IKEA.

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