The 10 Best Cities For Dogs

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iStock

Dog owners do it all to cater to their canines, whether it’s plying them with new toys and treats, or taking them to expensive doggy day spas. But would you pack your bags and move to a new city to please your pup? Some might—and if you’re one of them, you might want to check out Yelp’s ranking of the 10 most dog-friendly cities in the U.S., as spotted by Travel + Leisure.

The user-review website scored cities based on the percentage of Yelp page views they received in two categories: the Active category for dog parks and the Pets category for dog walkers. It also took into account the number of businesses that allow dogs inside, including hotels, restaurants, bars, cafes, and beaches.

As it turns out, the perfect place to be a pup is Arlington, Virginia. The small city of under 235,000 is home to eight dog parks, several walking trails, and many dog-friendly businesses.

Tampa, Florida, home to the Davis Island Dog Beach and Picnic Island Beach Dog Park, comes in second place. However, Yelp noted that only two cities per state were considered in its ranking, in order to achieve “geographic diversity.”

Ready to hit the road with your dog? Here’s the full list of the 10 most Fido-friendly cities in the country:

1. Arlington, Virginia
2. Tampa, Florida
3. West Hollywood, California
4. Dallas, Texas
5. Portland, Oregon
6. Minneapolis, Minnesota
7. Colorado Springs, Colorado
8. Seattle, Washington
9. Jersey City, New Jersey
10. Phoenix, Arizona

[h/t Travel + Leisure]

Do You Know the Fun Terms for These Groups of Animals?

Massive Swarms of Migrating Dragonflies Are So Large They’re Popping Up on Weather Radar

emprised/iStock via Getty Images
emprised/iStock via Getty Images

What do Virginia, Pennsylvania, Indiana, and Ohio all have in common? Epic swarms of dragonflies, among other things.

WSLS-TV reports that this week, weather radar registered what might first appear to be late summer rain showers. Instead, the green blotches turned out to be swarms of dragonflies—possibly green darners, a type of dragonfly that migrates south during the fall.

Norman Johnson, a professor of entomology at The Ohio State University, told CNN that although these swarms happen occasionally, they’re definitely not a regular occurrence. He thinks the dragonflies, which usually prefer to travel alone, may form packs based on certain weather conditions. If that sounds vague, it’s because it is: Johnson said that entomologists haven’t worked out all the details when it comes to dragonfly migration. They do know that the airborne insects cover an average of eight miles per day, while some overachievers can fly as far as 86.

Based on the radar footage shared by the National Weather Service’s Cleveland Office, the dragonfly clouds seem almost menacing. But, while swarms of any insect species aren’t exactly delightful, these creatures are both harmless and surprisingly beautiful, at least up close. Anna Barnett, a resident of Jeromesville, Ohio, even told CNN that witnessing the natural phenomenon was “amazing!”

Amazing as it may be to see, it’s hard to hear news about unpredictable animal behavior without wondering if it’s related in some way to Earth’s rising temperatures. After all, climate change has already affected wasps in Alabama, polar bears in Russia, and no doubt countless other animal species around the world.

[h/t WSLW-TV]

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