Coming Soon: An Ultra-Lightweight Backpack That "Floats" While You Carry It

iStock
iStock

Sometimes the most strenuous part of hiking is not the distance or altitude covered, but the heavy load you’re hauling around all day. Now, one company wants to take the backache out of hiking—and commuting, too.

As spotted by New Atlas, the forthcoming HoverGlide backpack by Lightning Packs is being billed as the “world’s first floating backpack.” The bag part is attached to a sliding rail and pulley suspension system, which allows it to bounce up and down on your back while you move around. It purportedly reduces the impact and strain on your back by up to 90 percent, letting you walk or run with relative ease.

The design is based on a 2006 study from the University of Pennsylvania, which found that bouncing backpacks can make a 59.5-pound load feel 11 pounds lighter. That's because they move out of step with your gait, canceling out the movement and eliminating the need to constantly lift the load as you move. And less energy equals more endurance, according to the backpack’s creators.

A fundraising campaign for the HoverGlide will be launched on Kickstarter in September. Four varieties of the backpack will be available: a 55-pound “Trekker” backpack for hiking and camping, a smaller “Hiker” for shorter outdoor excursions, a 25-lb “Commuter” backpack for regular daily use, and a “Tactical” backpack with a tough shell and webbing “for the military types out there,” according to New Atlas.

[h/t New Atlas]

This Adorable, Teeny, Tiny, Pink House Could Be Yours for $11,000

Pin-Up Houses
Pin-Up Houses

Don’t want to be burdened by monthly mortgage payments for the next 30 years of your life? You may want to think smaller and consider trading in your two-bedroom home for a tiny house. While these structures are certainly not for people who like to live lavishly, they might be the ideal choice—and perhaps even a stylish one—for those who embrace minimalism or travel often. At least that seems to be the target market for this hot-pink home spotted by Curbed.

Designed by architect Joshua Woodsman for tiny home purveyor Pin-Up Houses, the “Magenta” house measures just about 11 feet by 6 feet, but has all the basic necessities you’d need. It comes with a small kitchenette, sofa bed, water tank, toilet, gas cooker, and three electrical outlets.

Storage space can be found underneath the sofa bed, and additional belongings can be placed atop nets that are strung across the ceiling and walls. There’s also a table for al fresco dining. The cost? Only $11,000.

The structure is built atop a flatbed trailer, allowing homeowners to hitch it to their car and take it with them wherever they decide to live. The makers of this tiny home call it “a manifesto of temporary independent housing, against debt and mortgages.”

Check out the video below to see the interior and other details.

[h/t Curbed]

This Ingenious Hanger Makes Hanging Pants a Breeze, No Clips or Folds Required

Hurdle Hanger
Hurdle Hanger

Get ready to clean out your closet. No, we don’t mean going all Marie Kondo on your clothes. There’s a new type of clothes hanger that promises to change the way you store your clothes, taking the headache out of hanging up your pants.

The Hurdle Hanger, which has currently raised more than $33,000 on Kickstarter, calls itself the “one-second pants hanger.” Rather than relying on cumbersome clips or requiring bulky folding techniques, the hanger design employs one very simple change: It hooks into the belt loops of your pants.

The angular hanger is open on one side so that you can slide the bar through the belt loops of your pants, letting you secure your pants in one smooth motion rather than struggling with the pant clips that will just wrinkle your waistband anyway.

A person slides the Hurdle Hanger through the belt loops of a pants to hang them.
Hurdle Hanger

Just slide the hanger bar through the belt loop (or loops) farthest from you, then hang the belt loop closest to you from the hook. There is another hook midway across the bar that secures the middle belt loop, keeping your pants from drooping while they hang. In another subtle touch, you can use the same hook to hang smaller items, like belts or hats, off the side.

The Hurdle Hanger is an example of smart design at its finest—the kind of idea that, when you see it in action, makes you think, “Wait, how did no one think of this before?” It takes a once-cumbersome task and makes it seamless, eliminating at least some of the burden that may be keeping you from accomplishing the chore of hanging up your clothes. No more messing with clips or trying to shove pants through the cramped hole in the hanger to fold them over.

There are already open-end pants hangers that make it easier to slide a folded pair of slacks into your closet, but the belt loop hooks take the Hurdle Hanger to another level. You might even get inspired enough to start hanging your jeans.

A 10-pack of hangers is $20 on Kickstarter—though anything that makes you actively excited to organize your closet is priceless.

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