16 Spooky-as-Hell Photos From Inside Chernobyl

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Robin Esrock

It’s been 28 years since the meltdown of reactor number four in Ukraine’s Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, an unprecedented manmade disaster that affected much of Europe. Radiation levels are still sky high, but with a Geiger counter and the right permits, visitors can safely enter the 18-mile Zone of Exclusion on guided day-tours. What you’ll encounter is straight out of a horror movie.

© Robin Esrock

When reactor number four ignited, firefighters rushed to the scene oblivious and unprepared for the meltdown. Within days, many died from acute radioactive sickness. Today, the reactor is enclosed in a massive cement sarcophagus, designed to keep uranium isotopes from entering the atmosphere. The cement has already leaked radioactive lava, with the reactor still capable of fires and explosions. Ongoing maintenance of the sarcophagus remains a concern for all of Europe.

© Robin Esrock

A model Soviet city, Prypiat was home to 50,000 people and serviced the adjacent power plant. It was hastily abandoned after the meltdown, and has remained untouched ever since. Everything inside the city and surrounding area is contaminated. Empty and desolate, nature is reclaiming this once-thriving city.

© Robin Esrock

Visiting an old school is particularly haunting.

© Robin Esrock

Dolls with dead-stare eyes can be found as you approach the nursery. While visitors are strongly advised not to touch anything, some items have been arranged for maximum creep effect.

© Robin Esrock

According to some reports, some 4,000 children have been diagnosed with thyroid cancer as a direct result of the Chernobyl meltdown.

© Robin Esrock

Blackened, rusty cribs in the old nursery. You can almost hear the soft melodies of music boxes, violently disrupted with panic during evacuation. This is not the place for vivid imaginations.

© Robin Esrock

It will take centuries before anything in Prypiat can safely be destroyed. During that time, the evidence of humanity will continue to break down naturally, some more gracefully than others.

© Robin Esrock

Soviet-era propaganda and iconography are prominent. Prypiat was built as a model city to demonstrate the power and efficiency of the State, with the Chernobyl facility a symbol of national pride. Today it provides a fascinating glimpse into the past, and the hubris of the State’s political ambitions.

© Robin Esrock

The old gymnasium with its empty pool is a visitor highlight. Broken glass and cracked ceramic tiles are everywhere. You can listen to your scream echo throughout the gym and adjacent buildings.

© Robin Esrock

Moss, dust and bushes might look benign, but this growth has absorbed much of the radiation. Visitors are advised to watch where they step, and to avoid moss in particular. All visitors are screened on exit for exposure to radiation, with particular attention paid to hands and footwear.

© Robin Esrock

A fairground was scheduled to open just two days after the disaster. This creaking, rusted, radioactive Ferris wheel never took a single paying customer.

© Robin Esrock

Portraits of Communist party leaders have been stored backstage in the community theater, along with old props and equipment. Seats are torn, and decades-old dust sits heavy on the stage.

© Robin Esrock

If your visit needs a soundtrack, listen to the detuned strings in this abandoned piano shop. Neglect, creaking wood and wind result in disjointed twangs and ghostly whistles.

© Robin Esrock

Nature has been remarkably resilient. Moose, deer, boar, wolves, and bears have been reported in the area, breeding in large numbers. Scientists have been unable to detect any large-scale mutations. Safe from fishing rods, these giant catfish swim in the radioactive water river near the reactor.

© Robin Esrock

Chernobyl could have been much worse. Favorable winds saved thousands of lives, splitting the plume and sparing the city from the brunt of the initial radiation. The Soviet government originally planned to build the reactors just 15 miles from Ukraine’s capital of Kiev, which would have devastated a concentrated population.

Have we learned from Chernobyl? Scientists are warning the long-term effects of Japan’s 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster could be even worse.

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March 11, 2014 - 11:00am
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