10 Iconic Pieces of Movie History That You Can Own

Prop Store
Prop Store

Over 600 rare movie props and costumes that were once used by some of Hollywood’s leading actors will be up for grabs at the Prop Store’s upcoming Entertainment Memorabilia Live Auction, which will be held in London on September 20. Here’s a sneak peek at some of the items that will be going under the hammer:

1. HAN SOLO'S JACKET

Han Solo's jacket
Prop Store

Estimate: $661,000-$1.3 million

Anything that was once worn by Harrison Ford is bound to be cool, but the sleek, slate grey jacket that he wore in The Empire Strikes Back (1980) wouldn’t look out of place at a modern-day concert or art gallery. Of course, you probably wouldn’t want to wear a potentially million-dollar jacket around town, but it doesn’t hurt to dream.

2. CATWOMAN'S CORSET

Catwoman's corset
Prop Store

Estimate: $3,970-6,620

Michelle Pfeiffer wasn't the first actress to play Catwoman, but she did give the villain-slash-superhero a sultry, red-lipsticked look. This corset worn by Pfeiffer probably isn't the most comfortable attire for defeating nemeses, but it is an iconic piece of movie memorabilia.  

3. THE BACK TO THE FUTURE HOVERBOARD

A hoverboard
Prop Store

Estimate: $39,680-$66,140

Many people hoped we'd have hoverboards and flying cars by now. Unfortunately, that has yet to become a reality, but you can still take home this retro, neon-colored hoverboard prop used in Back to the Future II (1989). 

4. TYLER DURDEN'S FIGHT CLUB ROBE

Tyler Durden's robe
Prop Store

Estimate: $12,750-$19,130

In his role as Tyler Durden in the 1999 movie Fight Club, Brad Pitt is seen wearing this item—a deliberately worn and stained robe adorned with steaming coffee mugs—a design that "befits Tyler’s eclectic aesthetic,” according to the listing on the Prop Store’s website.

5. INDIANA JONES'S FEDORA 

A fedora
Prop Store

Estimate: $265,000-$397,000

Again, you can’t go wrong with a piece of Harrison Ford memorabilia. Fedoras may have fallen out of fashion, but it will always be the perfect hat for raiding temples, escaping booby traps, and saving the day. Also up for grabs is Indy’s bullwhip from Temple of Doom (1984), which is expected to sell for upwards of $66,000.

6. THE JUMANJI BOARD GAME

The Jumanji game
Prop Store

Estimate: $10,200-$12,760

Fear not—it’s just an empty case. According to Prop Store, several “static versions” of the board game were used for stunts in the 1995 film, as well as scenes in which actors carried the game around. Although the front of the game looks like it's made of ivory, it is actually cast in resin.

7. OLLIVANDER'S WAND BOXES

A wand box
Prop Store

Estimate: $510-$765

Wingardium leviosa! You won’t need a spell to bring these wand boxes back to your home—just a few hundred dollars lying around. The lot comes with two wand boxes that appeared in a scene showing Ollivander’s wand shop in the film Harry Potter and The Sorcerer’s Stone. The boxes were given to fans who attended the movie’s premiere at London's Leicester Square in 2001.

8. ROSE'S FAREWELL NOTE IN TITANIC

A letter from Titanic
Prop Store

Estimate: $5000-$8000

This simple, handwritten farewell note that Rose (Kate Winslet) gave to her fiance Cal (Billy Zane) before running away with Jack could fetch thousands of dollars. As fans of Titanic may remember, it reads, “Darling now you can keep us both locked in your safe.” It's still one of the best burns in movie history. 

9. LEGOLAS'S ARROW

An arrow
Prop Store

Estimate: $10,580-$13,230

Legolas, played by Orlando Bloom in The Lord of the Rings saga, was one sharp shooter. Now you can get your hands on the Lothlórien arrow that he used—but if you want to shoot like an elf, you may want to brush up on your archery skills first.  

10. AGENT J'S NOISY CRICKET

A gun from Men in Black
Prop Store

Estimate: $10,500-$15,800

This weapon is the first one given to Agent J (Will Smith) when he joins the Men in Black in the 1997 blockbuster. Although he was initially disappointed by its small size, “he later discovered that it packed quite a punch,” according to the Prop Store. The replica gun lights up when you pull the trigger.

How Much Is Game of Thrones Author George RR Martin Worth?

Kevin Winter, Getty Images
Kevin Winter, Getty Images

by Dana Samuel

Unsurprisingly, Game of Thrones took home another Emmy Award earlier this week for Outstanding Drama Series, which marked the series' third time winning the title. Of course, George RR Martin—the author who wrote the books that inspired the TV show, and the series' executive producer—celebrated the victory alongside ​the GoT cast.

For anyone who may be unfamiliar with Martin's work, he is the author of the A Song of Ice and Fire series, which is the epic fantasy series that lead to the Game of Thrones adaptation. Basically, we really we have him to thank for this seven-year roller coaster we've been on.

At 70 years old (his birthday was yesterday, September 20th), Martin has had a fairly lengthy career as an author, consisting of a number of screenplays and TV pilots before A Song of Ice and Fire, which, ​according to Daily Mail he wrote in the spirit of The Lord of the Rings.

 Cast and crew of Outstanding Drama Series winner 'Game of Thrones' pose in the press room during the 70th Emmy Awards at Microsoft Theater on September 17, 2018 in Los Angeles, California
Frazer Harrison, Getty Images

Martin sold the rights to his A Song of Ice and Fire series in 2007, and he truly owes the vast majority of his net worth to the success of his novels and the Game of Thrones TV series. So how much exactly is this acclaimed author worth? According to Daily Mail, Martin makes about $15 million annually from the TV show, and another $10 million from his successful literary works.

According to Celebrity Net Worth, that makes Martin's net worth about $65 million.

Regardless of his millions, Martin still lives a fairly modest life, and it's clear he does everything for his love of writing.

We'd like to extend a personal thank you to Martin for creating one of the most exciting and emotionally jarring storylines we've ever experienced.
We wish Game of Thrones could go ​on for 13 seasons, too!

15 Heartwarming Facts About Mister Rogers

Focus Features
Focus Features
Fred Rogers remains an icon of kindness for the ages. An innovator of children’s television, his salt-of-the-earth demeanor and genuinely gentle nature taught a generation of kids the value of kindness. Today, Google celebrates this "creator, musician, philosopher, and storyteller" with a stop-motion animation Doodle on its homepage. Here are 15 things you might not have known about everyone’s favorite “neighbor.” (Bonus fact: he recently got the Funko treatment!)

1. HE WAS BULLIED AS A CHILD.

According to Benjamin Wagner, who directed the 2010 documentary Mister Rogers & Me—and was, in fact, Rogers’s neighbor on Nantucket—Rogers was overweight and shy as a child, and often taunted by his classmates when he walked home from school. “I used to cry to myself when I was alone,” Rogers said. “And I would cry through my fingers and make up songs on the piano.” It was this experience that led Rogers to want to look below the surface of everyone he met to what he called the “essential invisible” within them.

2. HE WAS AN ORDAINED MINISTER.

Rogers was an ordained minister and, as such, a man of tremendous faith who preached tolerance wherever he went. When Amy Melder, a six-year-old Christian viewer, sent Rogers a drawing she made for him with a letter that promised “he was going to heaven,” Rogers wrote back to his young fan:
“You told me that you have accepted Jesus as your Savior. It means a lot to me to know that. And, I appreciated the scripture verse that you sent. I am an ordained Presbyterian minister, and I want you to know that Jesus is important to me, too. I hope that God’s love and peace come through my work on Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood.”

3. HE RESPONDED TO ALL HIS FAN MAIL.

Responding to fan mail was part of Rogers’s very regimented daily routine, which began at 5 a.m. with a prayer and included time for studying, writing, making phone calls, swimming, weighing himself, and responding to every fan who had taken the time to reach out to him. “He respected the kids who wrote [those letters],” Heather Arnet, an assistant on Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette in 2005. “He never thought about throwing out a drawing or letter. They were sacred." According to Arnet, the fan mail he received wasn’t just a bunch of young kids gushing to their idol. Kids would tell Rogers about a pet or family member who died, or other issues with which they were grappling. “No child ever received a form letter from Mister Rogers," Arnet said, noting that he received between 50 and 100 letters per day.

4. ANIMALS LOVED HIM AS MUCH AS PEOPLE DID.

It wasn’t just kids and their parents who loved Mister Rogers. Koko, the Stanford-educated gorilla who understood 2000 English words and could also converse in American Sign Language, was an avid Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood watcher, too. When Rogers visited her, she immediately gave him a hug—and took his shoes off.

5. HE WAS AN ACCOMPLISHED MUSICIAN.

Though Rogers began his education in the Ivy League, at Dartmouth, he transferred to Rollins College following his freshman year in order to pursue a degree in music (he graduated Magna cum laude). In addition to being a talented piano player, he was also a wonderful songwriter and wrote all the songs for Mister Rogers' Neighborhood—plus hundreds more.

6. HIS INTEREST IN TELEVISION WAS BORN OUT OF A DISDAIN FOR THE MEDIUM.

Rogers’s decision to enter into the television world wasn’t out of a passion for the medium—far from it. "When I first saw children's television, I thought it was perfectly horrible," Rogers told Pittsburgh Magazine. "And I thought there was some way of using this fabulous medium to be of nurture to those who would watch and listen."

7. KIDS WHO WATCHED MISTER ROGERS’ NEIGHBORHOOD RETAINED MORE THAN THOSE WHO WATCHED SESAME STREET.

A Yale study pitted fans of Sesame Street against Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood watchers and found that kids who watched Mister Rogers tended to remember more of the story lines, and had a much higher “tolerance of delay,” meaning they were more patient.

8. ROGERS’S MOM KNIT ALL OF HIS SWEATERS.

If watching an episode of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood gives you sweater envy, we’ve got bad news: You’d never be able to find his sweaters in a store. All of those comfy-looking cardigans were knitted by Fred’s mom, Nancy. In an interview with the Archive of American Television, Rogers explained how his mother would knit sweaters for all of her loved ones every year as Christmas gifts. “And so until she died, those zippered sweaters I wear on the Neighborhood were all made by my mother,” he explained.

9. HE WAS COLORBLIND.

Those brightly colored sweaters were a trademark of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, but the colorblind host might not have always noticed. In a 2003 article, just a few days after his passing, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette wrote that:
Among the forgotten details about Fred Rogers is that he was so colorblind he could not distinguish between tomato soup and pea soup. He liked both, but at lunch one day 50 years ago, he asked his television partner Josie Carey to taste it for him and tell him which it was. Why did he need her to do this, Carey asked him. Rogers liked both, so why not just dip in? "If it's tomato soup, I'll put sugar in it," he told her.

10. HE WORE SNEAKERS AS A PRODUCTION CONSIDERATION.

According to Wagner, Rogers’s decision to change into sneakers for each episode of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood was about production, not comfort. “His trademark sneakers were born when he found them to be quieter than his dress shoes as he moved about the set,” wrote Wagner.

11. MICHAEL KEATON GOT HIS START ON THE SHOW.

Oscar-nominated actor Michael Keaton's first job was as a stagehand on Mister Rogers' Neighborhood, manning Picture, Picture, and appearing as Purple Panda.

12. ROGERS GAVE GEORGE ROMERO HIS FIRST PAYING GIG, TOO.

It's hard to imagine a gentle, soft-spoken, children's education advocate like Rogers sitting down to enjoy a gory, violent zombie movie like Dawn of the Dead, but it actually aligns perfectly with Rogers's brand of thoughtfulness. He checked out the horror flick to show his support for then-up-and-coming filmmaker George Romero, whose first paying job was with everyone's favorite neighbor. “Fred was the first guy who trusted me enough to hire me to actually shoot film,” Romero said. As a young man just out of college, Romero honed his filmmaking skills making a series of short segments for Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, creating a dozen or so titles such as “How Lightbulbs Are Made” and “Mr. Rogers Gets a Tonsillectomy.” The zombie king, who passed away in 2017, considered the latter his first big production, shot in a working hospital: “I still joke that 'Mr. Rogers Gets a Tonsillectomy' is the scariest film I’ve ever made. What I really mean is that I was scared sh*tless while I was trying to pull it off.”

13. ROGERS HELPED SAVE PUBLIC TELEVISION.

In 1969, Rogers—who was relatively unknown at the time—went before the Senate to plead for a $20 million grant for public broadcasting, which had been proposed by President Johnson but was in danger of being sliced in half by Richard Nixon. His passionate plea about how television had the potential to turn kids into productive citizens worked; instead of cutting the budget, funding for public TV increased from $9 million to $22 million.

14. HE ALSO SAVED THE VCR.

Years later, Rogers also managed to convince the Supreme Court that using VCRs to record TV shows at home shouldn’t be considered a form of copyright infringement (which was the argument of some in this contentious debate). Rogers argued that recording a program like his allowed working parents to sit down with their children and watch shows as a family. Again, he was convincing.

15. ONE OF HIS SWEATERS WAS DONATED TO THE SMITHSONIAN.

In 1984, Rogers donated one of his iconic sweaters to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History.

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