Watch “Weird Al” Yankovic Join Weezer to Cover Toto’s ‘Africa’

Paul McConnell, Getty Images
Paul McConnell, Getty Images

Thirty-five years ago, Los Angeles-based rock band Toto scored their first—and only—number one Billboard hit with the cheesy-but-beloved pop anthem “Africa.” But the song regained its chart-topping status earlier this year when Weezer released their own version of the ‘80s classic, which ended up becoming the alt-rock band’s biggest hit in a decade.

They’ve been performing the song live in the months since, but Rivers Cuomo and company just upped the “Africa” ante by inviting “Weird Al” Yankovic and his legendary accordion skills to shred alongside them as they covered the song on Wednesday night at The Forum in Los Angeles. You can watch the performance below. (The whole video is worth a look, but “Weird Al” comes in around the 2:42 mark.)

In the decades since Toto first released “Africa,” everyone from Ninja Sex Party to Wiz Khalifa has either sampled or covered the yacht rock tune. It’s also been played at countless weddings and featured on the soundtracks of dozens of movies and television series. But it took popping up on Stranger Things for Weezer to bring their version to the table. Inspired by its inclusion in Netflix’s ode-to-everything-‘80s, a teenage fan of the series—and Weezer—started a #WeezerCoverAfrica Twitter campaign that gained some serious traction. Now, the tune has become part of the band’s regular repertoire.

Amazingly, “Africa” is a song that almost never was. In a recent interview with Yahoo! Entertainment, Toto keyboardist Steve Porcaro admitted that the tune “almost didn’t make the album [Toto IV]. If you look, it was totally buried [on the tracklisting]. It’s the last song—on the vinyl, the last cut of side two. You don’t put your only No. 1 single on the last cut of side two! So it’s been this weird anomaly to begin with.”

Porcaro also had some thoughts on how Weezer might have painted themselves into a musical corner with their cover. “Maybe it was just my imagination, but I thought maybe on Rivers Cuomo’s face, there was an expression like, ‘Oh s***, I might have to play this the rest of my life,’” he told Yahoo! Entertainment.

In July, Toto—who are in the midst of a 40th anniversary tour—showed their appreciation to Weezer by offering up a cover of “Hash Pipe.” As sure as Kilimanjaro rises like Olympus above the Serengeti, it’s spot-on.

11 Things You May Not Know About John Lennon

Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Before he was one of the world's most iconic musicians, John Lennon was a choir boy and a Boy Scout. Let's take a look at a few facts you might not have known about the leader and founding member of The Beatles

1. HE WAS A CHOIR BOY AND A BOY SCOUT.

Yes, John Lennon, the great rock 'n' roll rebel and iconoclast, was once a choir boy and a Boy Scout. Lennon began his singing career as a choir boy at St. Peter's Church in Liverpool, England and was a member of the 3rd Allerton Boy Scout troop.

2. HE HATED HIS OWN VOICE.

Incredibly, one of the greatest singers in the history of rock music hated his own voice. Lennon did not like the sound of his voice and loved to double-track his records. He would often ask the band's producer, George Martin, to cover the sound of his voice: "Can't you smother it with tomato ketchup or something?"

3. HE WAS DISSATISFIED WITH ALL OF THE BEATLES'S RECORDS.

Dining with his former producer, George Martin, one night years after the band had split up, Lennon revealed that he'd like to re-record every Beatles song. Completely amazed, Martin asked him, "Even 'Strawberry Fields'?" "Especially 'Strawberry Fields,'" answered Lennon.

4. HE WAS THE ONLY BEATLE WHO DIDN'T BECOME A FULL-TIME VEGETARIAN.

John Lennon (1940 - 1980) of the Beatles plays the guitar in a hotel room in Paris, 16th January 1964
Harry Benson, Express/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

George Harrison was the first Beatle to go vegetarian; according to most sources, he officially became a vegetarian in 1965. Paul McCartney joined the "veggie" ranks a few years later. Ringo became a vegetarian not so much for spiritual reasons, like Paul and George, but because of health problems. Lennon had toyed with vegetarianism in the 1960s, but he always ended up eating meat, one way or another.

5. HE LOVED TO PLAY MONOPOLY.

During his Beatles days, Lennon was a devout Monopoly player. He had his own Monopoly set and often played in his hotel room or on planes. He liked to stand up when he threw the dice, and he was crazy about the properties Boardwalk and Park Place. He didn't even care if he lost the game, as long as he had Boardwalk and Park Place in his possession.

6. HE WAS THE LAST BEATLE TO LEARN HOW TO DRIVE.

Lennon got his driver's license at the age of 24 (on February 15, 1965). He was regarded as a terrible driver by all who knew him. He finally gave up driving after he totaled his Aston-Martin in 1969 on a trip to Scotland with his wife, Yoko Ono; his son, Julian; and Kyoko, Ono's daughter. Lennon needed 17 stitches after the accident.

When they returned to England, Lennon and Ono mounted the wrecked car on a pillar at their home. From then on, Lennon always used a chauffeur or driver.

7. HE REPORTEDLY USED TO SLEEP IN A COFFIN.

According to Allan Williams, an early manager for The Beatles, Lennon liked to sleep in an old coffin. Williams had an old, abandoned coffin on the premises of his coffee bar, The Jacaranda. As a gag, Lennon would sometimes nap in it.

8. THE LAST TIME HE SAW PAUL MCCARTNEY WAS ON APRIL 24, 1976. 

Paul McCartney (left) and John Lennon (1940-1980) of the Beatles pictured together during production and filming of the British musical comedy film Help! on New Providence Island in the Bahamas on 2nd March 1965
William Lovelace, Daily Express/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

McCartney was visiting Lennon at his New York apartment. They were watching Saturday Night Live together when producer Lorne Michaels, as a gag, offered the Beatles $3000 to come on the show. Lennon and McCartney almost took a cab to the show as a joke, but decided against it, as they were just too tired. (Too bad! It would have been one of the great moments in television history.)

9. HE WAS ORIGINALLY SUPPOSED TO SING LEAD ON THE BEATLES'S FIRST SINGLE, 1962'S "LOVE ME DO."

Lennon sang lead on a great majority of the early Beatles songs, but Paul McCartney took the lead on their very first one. The lead was originally supposed to be Lennon, but because he had to play the harmonica, the lead was given to McCartney instead.

10. "ALL YOU NEED IS LOVE" WAS THE BEST LYRIC HE EVER WROTE.

A friend once asked Lennon what was the best lyric he ever wrote. "That's easy," replied Lennon, "All you need is love."

11. THE LAST PHOTOGRAPHER TO SNAP HIS PICTURE WAS PAUL GORESH.

Ironically (and sadly), Lennon was signing an album for the person who was to assassinate him a few hours later when he was snapped by amateur photographer Paul Goresh on December 8, 1980.

Lennon obligingly signed a copy of his latest album, Double Fantasy, for Mark David Chapman. Later that same day, Lennon returned from the recording studio and was gunned down by Chapman, the same person for whom he had so kindly signed his autograph.

Morbidly, a photographer sneaked into the morgue and snapped a photo of Lennon's body before it was cremated the day after his assassination. Yoko Ono has never revealed the whereabouts of his ashes or what happened to them.

This post originally appeared in 2012.

Interactive Music Map Showcases the Most Sung-About Places in the World

Express Newspapers/Getty Images
Express Newspapers/Getty Images

New York City has inspired many a musician, from Frank Sinatra to Stevie Wonder to Alicia Keys. So it probably won’t come as a surprise that the “city that never sleeps” is the most sung-about place on the planet, with more than 160 songs mentioning it by name, according to an analysis of 200,000 popular songs from Celebrity Cruises.

This only accounts for songs that have landed in one of the top 40 spots on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 or UK Official Singles chart since 1960. Celebrity Cruises took the lyrics of those songs and conducted a linguistics analysis and data visualization to pinpoint the cities, neighborhoods, and states that feature most prominently in music. They ended up with 2000 songs by 896 artists who sang about 420 different places around the world.

An interactive tool called Music Mapped lets you explore these inspiring destinations. After New York, London is the second most-sung-about place with 101 songs, followed by Los Angeles (87 songs), the state of California (67 songs), and Hollywood (66 songs). You can also browse by genre and decade, so in case you’ve been dying to know how many ‘80s country/folk songs have been written about Nova Scotia, the answer is one ("Letter From America" by The Proclaimers).

You can also search by place, artist, or country. Of all the artists included in this analysis, Drake is the one who has name-dropped the most places in his lyrics. So far, he’s rapped about 29 places, including his hometown of Toronto and farther-flung destinations like Rotterdam in the Netherlands. Jay-Z has rapped about 27 places, followed by Elvis (who sang about 23 places), Tinie Tempah (22 places), and The Beach Boys (22 places).

Check out the Celebrity Cruises website to try out the interactive map for yourself.

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