Marie Curie Has Been Declared the Most Influential Woman in History

Hulton Archive, Getty Images
Hulton Archive, Getty Images

Marie Curie is famous as a history-making chemist, physicist, and two-time Nobel Prize winner. Now she's been given another title: the most influential woman of all time, according to BBC History Magazine.

Curie holds the No.1 spot on the list of 100 significant women that will be appearing in the magazine in honor of the centennial of women's suffrage in the UK. The 100 female figures were nominated by 10 experts, each representing a different field of human endeavor. BBC History readers then voted on the list to determine ranking.

The Polish physicist blazed trails at the turn of the 20th century. She discovered two new elements, radium and polonium; coined the term radioactivity; and developed a portable x-ray machine to help treat soldiers during World War II. And her achievements aren't merely monumental because she was a woman. When she brought home her second Nobel Prize, she became the first person of any gender to win the award twice. To this day, she remains the only person, man or woman, to receive Nobel Prizes for two different sciences (physics and chemistry).

Patricia Fara, president of the British Society for the History of Science and Curie's nominator, told BBC History, "The odds were always stacked against her. In Poland her patriotic family suffered under a Russian regime. In France she was regarded with suspicion as a foreigner—and of course, wherever she went, she was discriminated against as a woman."

Curie is joined on the list by a host of iconic women who have shaped the trajectories of politics, literature, activism, and more. Ranking No.2 is Rosa Parks, the African-American woman who launched a movement when she refused to give up her seat on a bus for a white passenger. Ada Lovelace, the first computer programmer, Florence Nightingale, the founder of modern nursing, and Amelia Earhart, the famed aviator, also appear high on the list.

You can check out the full round-up on BBC History's website.

[h/t BBC History]

22 Weird Jobs From 100 Years Ago

Metal Floss via YouTube
Metal Floss via YouTube

Before everyone started working in tech, people actually had their choice of eclectic and strange vocations that put food on their old-timey tables. Discover what lamplighters, lectores, and knocker-uppers did back in the day as Mental Floss editor-in-chief Erin McCarthy runs down 22 Weird Old Jobs from 100 Years Ago.

For more episodes like this one, be sure to subscribe here.

The Definition of Museum Could Be Changing

The Louvre Museum in Paris, France.
The Louvre Museum in Paris, France.
roman_slavik/iStock via Getty Images

If you’ve always casually defined museum as “a place to see art or historical objects,” you’re not necessarily wrong. But the International Council of Museums (ICOM) has a more specific, official guideline that defines a museum as “a non-profit, permanent institution in the service of society and its development, open to the public, which acquires, conserves, researches, communicates, and exhibits the tangible and intangible heritage of humanity and its environment for the purposes of education, study, and enjoyment.”

ICOM’s 40,000 members have been adhering to this definition for almost 50 years to represent more than 20,000 museums around the world. Now, The Art Newspaper reports, some members want to change it.

On July 22, the organization’s executive board convened in Paris and composed a new definition that Danish curator Jette Sandahl believes better suits the demands of “cultural democracy.” By this updated description, a museum must “acknowledg[e] and addres[s] the conflicts and challenges of the present,” “work in active partnership with and for diverse communities to collect, preserve, research, interpret, exhibit, and enhance understandings of the world,” and “contribute to human dignity and social justice, global equality, and planetary wellbeing.”

The proposal immediately elicited harsh reactions from a number of other members of the museum community, who felt the text was too ideological and vague. François Mairesse, a professor at the Université Sorbonne Nouvelle and the chair of the International Committee of Museology, even resigned from the revisory commission—led by Sandahl—earlier this summer when he realized the new definition wasn’t, by his standards, really a definition. “This is not a definition but a statement of fashionable values, much too complicated and partly aberrant,” he told The Art Newspaper. “It would be disastrous to impose only one type of museum.”

The current plan is for ICOM members to vote on the definition at the general assembly on September 7 in Kyoto, Japan, but 24 national branches and five museums’ international committees have petitioned to postpone the vote—they’d like some time to create their own definition for museum and present it as a counter-proposal.

[h/t The Art Newspaper]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER