This Smart Oven Can Cook a 12-Pound Turkey—and Prepare Your Bacon 64 Different Ways

June
June

Say goodbye to soggy microwaved pizza. As spotted by Engadget, appliance company June just launched a new smart oven that comes with 100 preset cooking programs, including—thanks to popular demand—leftover pizza.

Perfect for those of us who aren't confident in our kitchen skills, the June oven takes the guesswork out of cooking. When you place food inside, the oven uses its HD camera to scan the item and determine what type of food it is. Use the 5-inch touchscreen to confirm that what you're cooking is, say, a steak, then insert a probe thermometer and select your preferred level of doneness. The oven switches between roast, broil, and bake settings, but you won’t have to do any of the work.

The oven's function can be converted into an air fryer, dehydrator, slow cooker, broiler, toaster, or warming drawer. It’s also highly tailored to individual preferences. Bacon, for instance, can be cooked 64 different ways in a June oven. Plus, it's large enough to hold a 12-inch pizza or a 12-pound turkey, so you're all set for both Super Bowl parties and Thanksgiving dinner.

Priced at $599, this version is $900 cheaper than the company's first smart oven, which launched two years ago and has since been discontinued. The company has had some time to learn what customers liked and didn't like about the June prototype, and they said the new version is "smarter" and cooks faster.

The oven pairs with Alexa-powered devices, and June's companion app lets users leave the kitchen and watch their food being cooked via their phones. The oven is now available to order on June's website.

[h/t Engadget]

How Microwaving Food Affects Its Nutritional Value

iStock/grzymkiewicz
iStock/grzymkiewicz

There’s probably no household appliance that sees more use than a microwave. For people who don’t have the time or inclination to prepare dinners from scratch or heat meals in a conventional oven, zapping food has become the ultimate method of time management in the kitchen.

Some people harbor the belief that a price has to be paid for that convenience—specifically, that food loses nutritional value by being subjected to a quick nuking.

The truth? Microwaving doesn’t harm a food’s nutrients. In fact, it may preserve them more than some slow-cook methods do.

The reason is found in how microwaves work. The appliances heat food by blasting it with waves of energy not unlike radio waves. These waves target water and other molecules in the food. Thermal energy quickly builds up, and dishes come out heated in a relatively short period of time. This process avoids two of the factors that can lead to nutrient loss: cooking duration and high temperatures. Typically, the longer and hotter food is cooked, the more its nutritional value dissipates.

The other advantage is that microwaves don’t require water for heating. If you boil broccoli, for example, the hot water allows nutrients to leach out of the vegetable. (While that makes for a good stock, your broccoli may be robbed of some of its healthy benefits.) A quick steam in the microwave leaves broccoli relatively intact.

That’s not to say that microwave cooking is superior to a stovetop. Cooking foods at reasonable temperatures and durations shouldn’t result in significant nutrient loss, though some is inevitable for any manner of cooking. But microwaving isn’t going to erase nutrients via some mysterious microwave alchemy, either.

[h/t CNN]

Golden Girls Cereal Has Arrived

NBC
NBC

Fans of The Golden Girls can now spend their mornings with Dorothy, Blanche, Sophia, and Rose. The ladies of the beloved sitcom now have their own cereal—and it's only available for a limited time, Today reports.

Funko—the toy company known for its vinyl Pop! dolls depicting nearly every character in pop culture (including, of course, The Golden Girls)—rolled out the special-edition cereal in Target stores on September 30. The box is decorated with Funko-fied versions of the four leading ladies, and the multi-grain loops themselves are a shade of deep blue that would look great on one of Rose's dresses.

At $8 a box, the product is more expensive than your average breakfast cereal, but that price includes a little something extra. Each box of Golden Girls cereal comes with its own version of a prize inside: a Funko Pop! figurine of one of the four women.

The cereal won't remain on shelves forever, so collect all the dolls while you still can.

[h/t Today]

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