Airbnb's Newest Listing: The Great Wall of China

Airbnb
Airbnb

Update: On August 9, Airbnb announced that the giveaway had been canceled. The company said in a statement, "While there was an agreement in place that was the basis for the announcement of this event, in light of recent feedback, we have respectfully made the decision to not move forward with this contest."

While traveling, do you prefer to rent rooms that are old and rustic with a great view? Then head on over to the Great Wall of China. As spotted by Business Insider, Airbnb is giving away a one-night stay in a centuries-old tower along one of the Seven Wonders of the Modern World (and yes, flights are included).

Four winners will have the chance to camp out in a historic tower overlooking the rolling hills of Yanqing, just beyond Beijing's city center. During the trip, which is scheduled for September 3 through September 9, 2018, guests will be treated to a gourmet Chinese meal and classical music at sunset.

The next morning, they'll be taken on a sunrise hike through the surrounding countryside, all while learning about the history and heritage of the Great Wall. After that, they can try their hand at some traditional Chinese activities, like seal-engraving and calligraphy. Airbnb says the contest is part of an effort to promote tourism in China and preserve the Great Wall, parts of which have fallen into disrepair.

As part of the package, which is valued at about $4400 per person, transportation and accommodations in other Beijing locations will also be included.

To enter, you’ll have to write a short prompt about “why it is more important now than ever to break down barriers between cultures and how you want to build new connections.” The contest is open to citizens of the U.S., UK, and nine other countries. Be sure to submit your entry via Airbnb’s listing page for the Great Wall by August 11 for your chance to win.

[h/t Business Insider]

New Jersey's Anthony Bourdain Food Trail Has Opened

Neilson Barnard/Getty Images
Neilson Barnard/Getty Images

Before Anthony Bourdain was a world-famous chef, author, or food and travel documentarian, he was just another kid growing up in New Jersey. Earlier this year, Food & Wine reported that Bourdain's home state would honor the late television personality with a food trail tracing his favorite restaurants. And that trail is now open.

Bourdain was born in New York City in 1956, and spent most of childhood living in Leonia, New Jersey. He often revisited the Garden State in his books and television shows, highlighting the state's classic diners and delis and the seafood shacks of the Jersey shore.

Immediately following Bourdain's tragic death on June 8, 2018, New Jersey assemblyman Paul Moriarty proposed an official food trail featuring some of his favorite eateries. The trail draws from the New Jersey episode from season 5 of the CNN series Parts Unknown. In it, Bourdain traveled to several towns throughout the state, including Camden, Atlantic City, and Asbury Park, and sampled fare like cheesesteaks, salt water taffy, oysters, and deep-fried hot dogs.

The food trail was approved following a unanimous vote in January, and the trail was officially inaugurated last week. Among the stops included on the trail:

  1. Frank's Deli // Asbury Park
  1. Knife and Fork Inn // Atlantic City
  1. Dock's Oyster House // Atlantic City
  1. Tony's Baltimore Grill // Atlantic City
  1. James' Salt Water Taffy // Atlantic City
  1. Lucille's Country Cooking // Barnegat
  1. Tony & Ruth Steaks // Camden
  1. Donkey's Place // Camden
  2. Hiram's Roadstand // Fort Lee

Chernobyl Creator Craig Mazin Urges Visitors to Treat the Exclusion Zone With Respect

Sean Gallup/Getty Images
Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Following the success of the HBO miniseries Chernobyl, one tour company reported that bookings to the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone located in Ukraine rose 35 percent. Now, series creator Craig Mazin is imploring the new wave of tourists to be respectful when snapping selfies at Chernobyl, Gizmodo reports.

A 2500-square-kilometer exclusion zone was established around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant shortly after its reactor exploded in 1986 and flooded the area with harmful radiation. The abandoned towns are still too radioactive for people to live there safely, but they have been deemed safe to visit temporarily with the supervision of a guide.

Chernobyl has supported a dark tourism industry for years, but thanks to the miniseries, photographs taken there are gaining new levels of attention online. News of influencers posing for irreverent selfies at the site of the nuclear disaster quickly went viral. Mazin tweeted:

Regardless of why people are visiting the site, being respectful in the presence of tragedy is always a good idea. It's also smart to resist leaving a tour group to snap the perfect selfie in some abandoned building: Tour companies warn that breaking rules and wandering off approved paths can lead to dangerous radiation exposure.

[h/t Gizmodo]

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