How Expensive Is Your Drunk Shopping Habit?

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iStock

A night of heavy drinking can lead to more than just nausea and a killer headache the morning afterward. It can also leave you with a credit card bill for some taxidermied alligator head you don't remember buying on Amazon. This is all thanks to tipsy shopping, which, according to a recent survey conducted by the Archstone Recovery Center, may be more expensive than you think.

Drunk Americans may be spending as much as $30 billion annually while shopping online, The Daily Dot reports. A separate survey conducted in February 2018 by the website Finder suggests as many as 46 percent of people have made a purchase while under the influence. Those drunk purchases add up: According to Finder’s research, Americans spend an average of $447.57 per year shopping while buzzed.

Gin is apparently the most dangerous alcohol for your wallet, according to the Archstone Recovery Center. Gin drinkers in Archstone’s survey spent the most on Amazon shopping sprees—an average of $82.40—and they were also likely to splurge on more expensive items (an average of $235.10 for the most expensive purchase). Whiskey drinkers, on the other hand, spend the least amount of money when they’re drunk ($38.84 on average), but they’re right behind gin drinkers in terms of splurging ($204.70 for the priciest Amazon orders).

But who spends more while drunk shopping on Amazon? Women, says Archstone, who spend an average of $45.39 on a drunk shopping spree (men spend an average of $39.87). Men spend more than women on their most expensive splurges, though ($198.27 and $154.81, respectively).

People regret some purchases more than others, Archstone says. Almost 67 percent of people in the survey regretted purchasing cell phones and phone accessories, and 34 percent regretted purchasing books. On the other hand, nobody regretted buying musical instruments, and a full 93 percent said they enjoyed their purchases of pet supplies.

Archstone’s survey wasn’t exactly scientific. According to the center’s methodology report, the study surveyed 1094 people, and the only qualifier for participation was that subjects had to have purchased an item on Amazon while drinking alcohol.

But the results are fascinating, and it’s a good reminder that shopping—like driving, texting, and exercising—is better left for when you’re sober.

[h/t The Daily Dot]

The Government Will Pay You $1000 to Adopt a Wild Horse

iStock.com/Callipso
iStock.com/Callipso

In an effort to reduce the population of wild horses out West, the U.S. Bureau of Land Management has scrapped the $125 fee for adopting a wild mustang and offered an incentive in its place. Anyone who brings home one of these horses will receive $1000 from the government, according to The New York Times.

You won’t have to travel to Wyoming to check out the selection, either. An “online corral” called Wild Horses Online lets you browse the different horses (and burros) available for adoption. You can peruse photos and short bios of the animals, narrowing your search by gender, age, color, height, training, and more. Some of the horses are completely untrained, while others have been “gentled,” meaning that they’ve had some degree of handling.

According to the bureau’s most recent data from March 2018, there are more than 66,000 wild horses in 10 states. Nevada is home to more than 40,000 of these animals, making it the state with the largest wild horse population. Montana has just 155 horses, a handful of which live on the state’s Wild Horse Island in Flathead Lake.

In many areas, rising populations and drought have threatened the animals’ access to food and water. The government has responded by rounding up the animals and bringing them to corrals or pastures that aren’t located on public land. About 50,000 horses were available for adoption as of last month.

In addition to the adoption program, the bureau has also been working with a nonprofit organization that hosts a national competition called Extreme Mustang Makeover, in which horse trainers have about 100 days to tame a wild horse. Some wild horses are also taken in and “gentled” by inmates at the Northern Nevada Correctional Center as part of a rehabilitation program. Similar programs exist in at least five other states as well.

[h/t The New York Times]

Here's What Investments in the Early Stock Offerings of Major Companies Would Be Worth Today

iStock.com/pressureUA
iStock.com/pressureUA

If you’re curious about what might have been when it comes to hypothetical stock market investing, a new infographic from the financial website How Much will get your attention. The site looked at the initial public offering, or IPO, of some of the biggest companies in tech and consumer goods over the past decades and how much that investment is worth today. (IPOs signal when stock is released for purchase by the general public.) Here's what they found.

A chart demonstrates the increase in value of stocks for successful companies
How Much

Putting down $100 for shares of McDonald’s when the company went public in 1965 and forgetting about it would have netted you $569,800 today. Even more profitable than fast-service burgers would have been Coca-Cola, although that stock would have had a century to appreciate.

The biggest score—and surprise—is Nike, which manages to deliver the biggest haul since its IPO launched in 1980. Nike stocks traded at just 18 cents a share then but ballooned to over $85 in February 2019. Microsoft was far more valued at the time of its IPO, trading at $21 a share in 1986, but its value has only gone up—a share is now worth $108.22 in 2019.

The site accounted for stocks that were held through falling and rising stock prices, stock splits, and stocks with dividends taken out and not reinvested.

While it may seem like a bit of financial daydreaming, the chart is an intriguing illustration of the brands that have resonated with the public over the years. When Starbucks went public in 1992, some prospective investors believed that selling coffee for the then-outrageous price of $1 per cup with Italian names that many people couldn’t pronounce was ridiculous. For others, believing in the power of the latte paid off.

[h/t Digg]

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