How to Sing 'Happy Birthday' Around the World

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iStock

Numerous cultures around the world kick off birthday celebrations with a specific song designed to congratulate someone on the anniversary of their birth. In a new video, Condé Nast Traveler brought 70 people together from nations across the world to demonstrate how to sing “Happy Birthday” in their native language.

The short video features singers from South Africa, Malaysia, Estonia, Taiwan, Belgium, and dozens of other places singing the birthday song they would use at home.

Most follow the familiar tune that English speakers use when they sing “Happy Birthday.” That famous melody was originally written as a children’s song called “Good Morning to All” by sisters Mildred Hill and Patty Smith Hill in the late 1800s (though it may have been based off a folk tune).

Notably, some of the international songs in the video feature very different melodies that might not be recognizable to the foreign ear. If you’re used to the melody used in the English version of the song, you might not even recognize that the songs from Russia, Iran, Sweden, or Greece are birthday songs—unlike iterations from Germany, Georgia, Lebanon, China, and elsewhere that follow the "Good Morning to All" tune. The video also features input from some people whose native countries don't sing any songs at all.

Practice your international birthday-celebration skills using the video below.

[h/t Digg]

Watch the Museum of London's Fatberg Sweat and Grow Mold in Real Time

Daniel Leal-Olivas, AFP/Getty Images
Daniel Leal-Olivas, AFP/Getty Images

Unlike most other museums exhibits, the fatberg sample at the Museum of London is constantly changing. The chunk of congealed grease and garbage changes color, sweats, and even produces broods of freshly hatched flies. Now, The Guardian reports that you can stay up-to-date on the fatberg's ever-shifting status by livestreaming it into your home.

On August 14, the Museum of London debuted its live FatCam on its website. The dried-out fat glob in the video is one of the last remaining samples of the Whitechapel fatberg, a 143-ton mass consisting of oil poured down sink drains and city litter that was discovered in London's sewer system in September 2017.

From February 9 to July 1, 2018, the museum displayed the unique artifact under three layers of cases for visitors to see. The object proved difficult to preserve, and curators weren't entirely sure it would make it to the end of its exhibition, let alone survive to see another showing.

The fatberg has since been quarantined in the museum's archives. Rather than alter the fatberg to keep it around as long as possible, the museum has decided to broadcast its gradual demise to the world.

In the month since the sample has been taken off display and placed in a special case, drastic changes have been documented. Yellow pustules have surfaced on the fatberg's exterior—a sign of what conservators have determined is the toxic mold aspergillus. The object likely grew the spores when it was on display and only now have they become visible.

Dangerous mold and other organisms living within the crevices of the fat mounds are some of the reasons why the sample is no longer available to view in person. For a safer and slightly less disgusting view of the fatberg, check out the live stream below.

[h/t The Guardian]

Delta and Equinox Teamed Up to Create Jet Lag-Fighting Workouts

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iStock

When traveling across time zones, jet lag is practically unavoidable. The temporary condition disrupts your internal body clock, making you feel groggy and irritable.

Hitting the town once you land at your destination, let alone working out, may seem out of the question. However, exercise is one of the best things you can do for your jet-lagged body, and you'll feel much better afterward.

Delta Air Lines and Equinox Fitness have teamed up to create a series of equipment-free workouts that specifically target jet lag, according to Travel + Leisure. Three videos guide viewers through three rounds of exercise, each targeting a different region—upper body, lower body, and core.

Viewers can select one round (or more) and do each of the featured moves for one minute, then repeat each move two more times. If doing all three rounds, it would take about 30 minutes to complete the main portion of the workout. A cool-down video has also been created to take viewers through some guided stretches.

The workout is low-impact and aims to reduce stiffness and wake up your senses. It’s recommended that the workout be done 12 to 24 hours after landing.

"This is when your body is most vulnerable and susceptible to time zone changes, so working out in this time can resync your circadian rhythm, lower your cortisol levels, and impact circulation and mobility,” Equinox group fitness manager Dana McCaw tells Travel + Leisure.

The workout videos, which are posted on YouTube, can be watched below:

[h/t Travel + Leisure]

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