This Website Allows You to See the Traditional Indigenous Territories and Languages in Your Region

Native Land
Native Land

Within North America and many other regions colonized by Europeans, the indigenous territorial borders that once divided the land have largely disappeared. Though non-Native people might learn about the particular groups that once lived in their immediate area in school, most of us aren’t aware of the exact geography of which areas were traditionally occupied by which groups across the U.S. and the world. A mapping project called Native Land is aiming to change that, as Atlas Obscura reports.

The interactive site was created by Canadian mapping specialist Victor Temprano, who grew up within the territory of the Okanagan people in British Columbia. It features several different ways to explore the boundaries of indigenous history: through territory, language, and historic treaties. Each of the colorful blobs that represent the approximate boundaries of each territory, language, or treaty contains a link that lets you further explore the area, linking out to tribes’ websites, government information about particular treaties, and more.

The map allows you to see the huge diversity of indigenous people whose history has often been erased and forgotten, and the overlaps between tribes and languages in different areas. While the map doesn't yet tackle the entire world, it has a wealth of information on Canada, the U.S., Mexico, New Zealand, and Australia, and some places in South America and Greenland.

Colored overlays showing territory and language boundaries in the western U.S. and Canada
Traditional territories and languages in the western U.S. and Canada
Native Land

A map of the Northeastern U.S. showing traditional territories and languages
Traditional territory and language boundaries in the northeastern U.S.
Native Land

Temprano doesn’t claim Native Land is a definitive guide—or even a complete one—and welcomes any community feedback on the content presented. He told Atlas Obscura that he has gotten thousands of emails over the past few years suggesting changes, and has worked to incorporate that information into the map.

“I’ve learned that the idea of ‘traditional territory’ is actually very slippery. It can mean a strongly defined official boundary (Squamish nation, for instance), a general sense of land familiarity or habitation (some Métis people), a historically inhabited area, or it can be shorthand for how people identify themselves,” he writes on the Native Land blog. “Above all, I’ve tried to make the territory layer about self-identification. Whenever people feel they or their peoples are not represented, I’ve attempted to add them … So approach the layer with caution, and don’t treat it as an academic set of truths—if you can help it. It’s a good place to get started, but it’s really about you taking the initiative to learn more and think carefully about these questions.”

[h/t Atlas Obscura]

The Most-Googled Mental Health Symptoms in Each State

iStock.com/eclipse_images
iStock.com/eclipse_images

Before visiting a doctor for a medical diagnosis, many people turn to Google to learn more about symptoms like sweaty palms, back pain, and morning sickness. But physical ailments aren't the only conditions people are self-diagnosing on the web—the map below from TermLife2Go shows the most-Googled mental health symptoms by state.

For this report, the life insurance agency compiled a list of the common mental health conditions from sources like NAMI (the National Alliance on Mental Illness), TalkSpace, and MentalHealth.gov and used Google Trends to determine which symptoms people are searching for.

TermLife2Go found that social media and internet addiction, major depressive disorder, and memory loss were the most-Googled mental health terms from the past year, with one of the three conditions topping search results in 13 states. In Alaska, where some northern residents deal with constant darkness during the winter, people are searching for seasonal affective disorder. Financial stress is the most searched-for mental health symptom in New York, which also happens to be one of the most expensive places to live in the U.S.

Map of most Googled mental health symptoms in the U.S.
TermLife2Go

Whether your medical symptoms are mental or physical, it's always better to consult a professional rather than rely on the internet for help. But if you can't resist asking Google about what ails you, there is a right way to search for your symptoms—learn more here.

The Most Binge-Watched TV Show in Each State

iStock.com/franckreporter
iStock.com/franckreporter

Does geographical location influence taste when it comes to binge-watching TV shows? That was the question tackled by Geek.com, which polled 1500 people across the country recently to discover which shows rank among the most popular in each state. Here’s what they found out.

An infographic shows the most-binged television shows in each state
Geek.com

It comes as little surprise that Game of Thrones, which is available on HBO’s cable and streaming platforms, is a series that exhibits widespread appeal. The fantasy drama, which is currently airing its eighth and final season, ranks as the show most likely to be binged and the favorite of eight states. Coming in second was The Office (Netflix), with Ozark (Netflix), The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel (Amazon Prime), and Grace and Frankie (Netflix) rounding out the top five.

A list of the most-binged shows in the country is pictured
Geek.com

Many of the binged shows are comedies, with 44.9 percent of respondents deeming it their preferred genre. Residents of Alaska, Hawaii, New Mexico, North Carolina, and Utah were notable exceptions, with those states leaning toward dramas.

While shows like Friends, NCIS, and Stranger Things ranked first in many states, others hold some outliers. The Hallmark family drama When Calls the Heart is favored in Utah, Nevada prefers the CW series Supernatural, and North Dakota enjoys the violent action-drama The Punisher.

While Game of Thrones is on top for now, streaming services shouldn’t underestimate the affection for network sitcoms. Of those polled, 19 percent said they would cancel Netflix if Friends left the line-up, and 14 percent would do the same if The Office disappeared.

[h/t Geek.com]

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