This Website Allows You to See the Traditional Indigenous Territories and Languages in Your Region

Native Land
Native Land

Within North America and many other regions colonized by Europeans, the indigenous territorial borders that once divided the land have largely disappeared. Though non-Native people might learn about the particular groups that once lived in their immediate area in school, most of us aren’t aware of the exact geography of which areas were traditionally occupied by which groups across the U.S. and the world. A mapping project called Native Land is aiming to change that, as Atlas Obscura reports.

The interactive site was created by Canadian mapping specialist Victor Temprano, who grew up within the territory of the Okanagan people in British Columbia. It features several different ways to explore the boundaries of indigenous history: through territory, language, and historic treaties. Each of the colorful blobs that represent the approximate boundaries of each territory, language, or treaty contains a link that lets you further explore the area, linking out to tribes’ websites, government information about particular treaties, and more.

The map allows you to see the huge diversity of indigenous people whose history has often been erased and forgotten, and the overlaps between tribes and languages in different areas. While the map doesn't yet tackle the entire world, it has a wealth of information on Canada, the U.S., Mexico, New Zealand, and Australia, and some places in South America and Greenland.

Colored overlays showing territory and language boundaries in the western U.S. and Canada
Traditional territories and languages in the western U.S. and Canada
Native Land

A map of the Northeastern U.S. showing traditional territories and languages
Traditional territory and language boundaries in the northeastern U.S.
Native Land

Temprano doesn’t claim Native Land is a definitive guide—or even a complete one—and welcomes any community feedback on the content presented. He told Atlas Obscura that he has gotten thousands of emails over the past few years suggesting changes, and has worked to incorporate that information into the map.

“I’ve learned that the idea of ‘traditional territory’ is actually very slippery. It can mean a strongly defined official boundary (Squamish nation, for instance), a general sense of land familiarity or habitation (some Métis people), a historically inhabited area, or it can be shorthand for how people identify themselves,” he writes on the Native Land blog. “Above all, I’ve tried to make the territory layer about self-identification. Whenever people feel they or their peoples are not represented, I’ve attempted to add them … So approach the layer with caution, and don’t treat it as an academic set of truths—if you can help it. It’s a good place to get started, but it’s really about you taking the initiative to learn more and think carefully about these questions.”

[h/t Atlas Obscura]

Here's How Daylight Saving Time Affects Your Part of the Country

Andy Woodruff
Andy Woodruff

Daylight saving time was created to benefit Americans, but not every part of the country is affected equally. Within the Eastern time zone, for instance, the sun rises a whole 40 minutes earlier in New York City than it does in Detroit. To illustrate how daylight saving time impacts sunrise and sunset times around the county, cartographer Andy Woodruff published a series of helpful maps on his website.

Below, the map on the left depicts how many days of reasonable sunrise time—defined as 7 a.m. or earlier—each part of the country is getting. The regions in the yellow sections have the most days with early sunrises and the darker parts have the fewest. On the right, the second map shows how many sunsets past 5 p.m. we’re getting each year, which appear to be a lot more abundant

Next, he visualized what these sunrise and sunset times would look like if daylight saving were abolished completely, something many people have been pushing for years. While our sunset times remain pretty much the same, the mornings start to look a lot sunnier for people all over the country, especially in places like West Texas.

And for those of you who were curious, here’s what America would look like if daylight saving time were in effect year-round. While mornings would look miserable pretty much everywhere, there’d at least be plenty of sunshine to enjoy once we got off work.

You can tinker with an interactive version of the daylight saving map on Woodruff’s blog.

All images courtesy of Andy Woodruff.

This article originally ran in 2015.

The Most Popular Netflix Documentary in Each State

Netflix
Netflix

Before there was Making a Murderer, there was The Staircase. The true crime docuseries—which debuted in 2004 before making its way to Netflix in extended form—chronicles the 2001 death of Kathleen Peterson and the bizarre twists and turns of her husband Michael's subsequent murder trial. Though the extended version only arrived on the streaming service in June 2018, it's already America’s favorite Netflix documentary, according to a new analysis by DISH.

To map America's viewing habits, DISH figured out which Netflix Originals documentaries and docuseries had at least a 7.8 rating on IMDB, then plugged them into Google to track their search volume over the last year. The results reveal the geographic regions where Netflix viewers are dying to learn more about certain documentaries.

It’s perhaps no surprise that The Staircase, which left viewers with more questions than answers, is one of the top-searched series. It's the fan favorite in 12 states, including North Carolina, where the incident occurred. The 2016 documentary 13th follows closely behind as the most popular documentary in 11 states. Last Chance U (2016), Making a Murderer, and series The Toys That Made Us also made the top five.

Among the most popular documentaries, three are related to murder cases, three are related to the natural world, two are about the healthcare industry, and two are about the police and race relations. Others tell the story of specific events in history (like the time a cult overtook a sleepy town in Oregon) or cultural phenomena (like how certain toys shaped our childhoods).

Events that hit close to home also add another layer of fascination. This year's Flint Town is the most-searched documentary in Michigan, and Making a Murderer is a favorite in Wisconsin, where the events take place.

Keep scrolling to see the full breakdown by state, courtesy of DISH. Looking for something new to binge? Check out these 25 documentaries that you can stream right now. 

A map of the U.S. with icons showing the most popular documentaries there
DISH

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