Thousand-Year-Old Anvil Still Has the Smith’s Handprints on It

Steve Dockrill
Steve Dockrill

Archaeologists working on the Scottish island of Rousay discovered two stone anvils that likely date back at least 1000 years—and one still bears handprints, likely made by the copper smith who used it, according to the BBC.

The discovery was the result of a dig by the Swandro-Orkney Coastal Archaeology Trust that has been ongoing since 2010. (The site, located near the Bay of Swandro, is known as the Knowe of Swandro, and Rousay is part of the Orkney Islands.)

A close up of a dark handprint on a stone slab
Steve Dockrill

At first, the researchers assumed the handprint belonged to one of them, left during the process of excavating the anvils from the remains of the partially underground workshop. However, they have since realized that the marks are hand and knee prints left by the smith. The knee marks are likely from the smith kneeling next to the anvil and brushing against it regularly.

The building has been identified as a Pictish structure dating to the 6th to 9th century CE. The Picts, a group of tribes that lived in Scotland in the late Iron Age (around the 3th century CE) into the Early Middle Ages, disappeared around 1100 CE. Excavation co-director Julie Bond told the BBC that she pegs the age of the prints between 1000 and 1500 years old.

The Swandro-Orkney Coastal Archaeology Trust is attempting to excavate and study the site before it falls prey to rising sea levels and coastal erosion on the island.

[h/t BBC]

A ‘Lost’ Viking Graveyard Was Discovered in Norway

LMGPhotos/iStock via Getty Images
LMGPhotos/iStock via Getty Images

Contrary to popular belief, Scandinavian Vikings didn't send their dead out to sea on flaming ships. When someone died, they buried the body in the ground just as people have been doing across cultures for centuries. A recent discovery sheds new light on the Vikings' version of the practice. As Atlas Obscura reports, an entire Viking graveyard has been unearthed by archaeologists in Norway.

A survey leading up to a highway expansion revealed the site in Vinjeøra, a town located next to an ancient Viking farm. The graveyard contains several boat burials. While there's no evidence of Vikings ever conducting burials at sea in Scandinavia, they did sometimes load their cadavers onto boats—the boats just happened stay on land and act as coffins rather than watery graves. This may have contributed to the modern Viking funeral myth.

Among the boats, the dig team also found the remains of 20 burial mounds, including one that was especially noteworthy. The mound—which had been leveled by centuries of agriculture—once covered a mortuary house where a body was laid to rest. Archaeologists say the size and elaborate nature of the grave indicate that someone important, such as a chieftain or war hero, was buried there.

The house itself is no longer around for researchers to study, but it did leave behind a rectangular footprint, and a few foundational stones as evidence of its existence. By studying the grave mounds and boats, the archaeologists hope to learn more about a group of people that disappeared without leaving behind any written records of their lives.

Viking grave sites don't just tell us who the Vikings revered and how they treated their dead—they can also tell us what they did for fun. Ancient burial boats have revealed that some Vikings were buried with board games.

[h/t Atlas Obscura]

Civil War Cannonballs Found on South Carolina Beach in Aftermath of Hurricane Dorian

ABDESIGN/iStock via Getty Images
ABDESIGN/iStock via Getty Images

Hurricane Dorian skimmed the United States' East Coast last week, creating a trail of damage residents are still dealing with. But it wasn't just trash and debris the storm surges left behind: As WCSC reports, two cannonballs dating back to the Civil War were discovered on Folly Beach in South Carolina in the aftermath of the storm.

Aaron Lattin and his girlfriend Alba were walking on the beach on September 6 when they saw what looked like rocks nestled in the sand. As they examined them more closely, they realized they had found something much more special. The weathered objects were actually cannonballs that have likely been buried in the area for more than 150 years.

Incredibly, this isn't the first time Civil War cannonballs have been discovered on Folly Beach following a hurricane: In 2016, Hurricane Matthew unearthed 16 of them. Folly Island was used as a Union base a century and a half ago, and items leftover from the artillery battery built there are still scattered around the shoreline. The couple behind this latest discovery believes there are more waiting to be found.

Old cannonballs may look like cool artifacts to treasure hunters, but they should still be treated with caution. Police and bombs disposal technicians were called to the scene at Folly Beach to confirm the cannonballs were no longer functional.

[h/t WCSC]

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