Marilyn Monroe and Joe DiMaggio's Former New York Hotel Suite Is Taking Reservations

Krisztina Crane/Evan Joseph Studios
Krisztina Crane/Evan Joseph Studios

Marilyn Monroe’s 274-day marriage to baseball legend Joe DiMaggio may have been short-lived, but one hotel in New York City is paying homage to the famous couple's fleeting romance.

A luxury suite at The Lexington Hotel has been revamped and is now taking reservations, Travel + Leisure reports. The couple moved into the room—formerly known as The Centerfield Suite—shortly after their wedding and honeymoon in 1954.

The hotel's bedroom
Krisztina Crane/Evan Joseph Studios

It was during this period that Monroe filmed her famous flying white dress scene for The Seven Year Itch, which was shot just a few blocks from The Lexington Hotel. Although the scene is iconic, Monroe’s husband was less than pleased. In fact, he was so enraged by the "exhibitionist" scene that he "stormed across the set," according to The Guardian, and later had a nasty row with Monroe. Not long after their fight, Monroe filed for divorce, citing the “mental cruelty” she endured.

However, the pair later made amends and may have even rekindled their romance. Shortly before Monroe’s death in 1962, DiMaggio reportedly told friends that he and Monroe were going to get remarried. After she died, DiMaggio took charge of the funeral arrangements, and he had roses delivered to her grave twice a week for 20 years. This romantic spirit is preserved in the newly renovated Norma Jeane Suite, named after the Hollywood starlet’s given name at birth.

The outdoor patio
The Lexington Hotel

The 600-square-foot room, which goes for $1200 per night, is certainly up to Hollywood standards. It boasts marble floors, velvet and silk textiles, a terrace overlooking the city, a walk-in closet decorated with bags from Bloomingdales (Monroe’s favorite store), and artwork and photographs featuring Monroe. The pops of red throughout the room are likely a nod to Monroe’s signature lip color, and lest DiMaggio be forgotten, a baseball bat is placed inside an umbrella stand.

[h/t Travel + Leisure]

Stephen King's Maine Home Will Become a Museum and Writer's Retreat

Russ Quinlan, Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0
Russ Quinlan, Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0

Early in his career, author Stephen King (It, The Shining, The Outsider) embraced his public persona of being a spooky writer of the macabre. He purchased a 19th-century Victorian mansion in Bangor, Maine in 1980 for $135,000 and spent some Halloweens outside passing out candy to trick-or-treaters.

Now, King’s residence is set to become something of a Bangor landmark. As Rolling Stone reports, King and his wife Tabitha requested that their private home at 47 West Broadway be rezoned as a nonprofit center, which the Bangor City Council granted this week. The plan is to turn the home into a museum devoted to King’s work as well as a writer’s retreat.

King isn’t evicting himself, exactly. While he remains the owner, he and his family have spent less time at the residence over the years, instead residing in Florida or Oxford County, Maine.

Shortly after King purchased the home, he wrote and read aloud an essay addressing why he chose Bangor and his earliest impressions of 47 West Broadway. “I think it disapproved of us at first,” he wrote. “The parlor seemed cold in a way that had little to do with temperature. The cat would not go into that room; the kids avoided it. My oldest son was convinced there were ghosts in the turret towers …” A few months in, King recalled, his family began to settle in.

The Bangor home has morphed into a tourist attraction of sorts over time, with fans of King’s making a pilgrimage to the spot to take photos or idle around its ornate iron gate. Soon they’ll be able to peek inside, though the museum will be by appointment only. It’s not yet known when the home will open to visitors or how writers can apply to stay there.

[h/t Rolling Stone]

These 25 Cities Have the Worst Drivers in America

Believe_In_Me/iStock via Getty Images
Believe_In_Me/iStock via Getty Images

If you’re driving in a new city, you might find yourself prone to more fits of road rage than usual, probably because you haven’t yet adapted to the tacit differences in road etiquette. Perhaps you find Pittsburgh drivers to be more mercurial and aggressive than you’re used to, or maybe drivers are so laid-back in Little Rock that you feel like you’ll never reach your destination.

Though everyone is entitled to their own opinions about which cities have the most untrained, absent-minded hooligans on the highway, insurance quote comparison site QuoteWizard broke down a ton of data to determine a ranking of which cities—statistically speaking—actually have the worst drivers. To do it, the team analyzed millions of insurance quotes and added up the numbers of accidents, speeding tickets, DUIs, and citations (which include running red lights, texting while driving, etc.) in 75 cities across the country.

Based on those metrics, they determined that the absolute worst driving city is Portland, Oregon, which boasts the highest number of speeding tickets in the nation. The runner-up is Boise, Idaho, which saw an increasing number of DUIs drive the city up 25 spots from last year’s list (where it ranked 27th).

A staggering seven California cities ranked in the top 25, including Sacramento, San Francisco, San Diego, and Los Angeles. And South Carolina proved to be small but mighty when it comes to driving indiscretions: Greenville, Charleston, and Columbia all made the list.

While this list seems to skew toward the West Coast, many of the top 25 best driving cities are in the Midwest and the South. Detroit, Michigan, takes home the trophy for best driving city, followed by Louisville, Kentucky; Chicago, Illinois; and Miami, Florida.

See below for the full list of worst driving cities, and find out the factors contribute to bad driving here. You can view QuoteWizard's full list of best and worst cities for drivers here.

  1. Portland, Oregon

  1. Boise, Idaho

  1. Virginia Beach, Virginia

  1. Columbus, Ohio

  1. Sacramento, California

  1. Salt Lake City, Utah

  1. Cleveland, Ohio

  1. Denver, Colorado

  1. San Francisco, California

  1. Richmond, Virginia

  1. Madison, Wisconsin

  1. Fresno, California

  1. Bakersfield, California

  1. Seattle, Washington

  1. Omaha, Nebraska

  1. Colorado Springs, Colorado

  1. Dayton, Ohio

  1. Greenville, South Carolina

  1. Charleston, South Carolina

  1. Columbia, South Carolina

  1. Rochester, New York

  1. San Diego, California

  1. Los Angeles, California

  1. Washington, DC

  1. Riverside, California

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