Marilyn Monroe and Joe DiMaggio's Former New York Hotel Suite Is Taking Reservations

Krisztina Crane/Evan Joseph Studios
Krisztina Crane/Evan Joseph Studios

Marilyn Monroe’s 274-day marriage to baseball legend Joe DiMaggio may have been short-lived, but one hotel in New York City is paying homage to the famous couple's fleeting romance.

A luxury suite at The Lexington Hotel has been revamped and is now taking reservations, Travel + Leisure reports. The couple moved into the room—formerly known as The Centerfield Suite—shortly after their wedding and honeymoon in 1954.

The hotel's bedroom
Krisztina Crane/Evan Joseph Studios

It was during this period that Monroe filmed her famous flying white dress scene for The Seven Year Itch, which was shot just a few blocks from The Lexington Hotel. Although the scene is iconic, Monroe’s husband was less than pleased. In fact, he was so enraged by the "exhibitionist" scene that he "stormed across the set," according to The Guardian, and later had a nasty row with Monroe. Not long after their fight, Monroe filed for divorce, citing the “mental cruelty” she endured.

However, the pair later made amends and may have even rekindled their romance. Shortly before Monroe’s death in 1962, DiMaggio reportedly told friends that he and Monroe were going to get remarried. After she died, DiMaggio took charge of the funeral arrangements, and he had roses delivered to her grave twice a week for 20 years. This romantic spirit is preserved in the newly renovated Norma Jeane Suite, named after the Hollywood starlet’s given name at birth.

The outdoor patio
The Lexington Hotel

The 600-square-foot room, which goes for $1200 per night, is certainly up to Hollywood standards. It boasts marble floors, velvet and silk textiles, a terrace overlooking the city, a walk-in closet decorated with bags from Bloomingdales (Monroe’s favorite store), and artwork and photographs featuring Monroe. The pops of red throughout the room are likely a nod to Monroe’s signature lip color, and lest DiMaggio be forgotten, a baseball bat is placed inside an umbrella stand.

[h/t Travel + Leisure]

Attention Aspiring Astronauts: Arlo Skye Now Has Space-Themed Luggage

Arlo Skye
Arlo Skye

While some travelers are preoccupied with getting their luggage through airport security, the designers at Arlo Skye are thinking bigger. As Condé Nast Traveler reports, the brand's new line of suitcases is inspired by space travel, with high tech features and a sleek, futuristic look.

Arlo Skye was founded in 2016 by alumni from Louis Vuitton and Tumi Inc. They set out to create luggage that emphasized design, with luxury polycarbonate suitcases available in trendy colors like rose gold and custom monogramming.

The company's Space Collection may be its most stylized line yet. It comes with a removable, 10,050-milliamp-hour charger with USB C and A ports for charging phones and other devices. The chrome-colored case is 22 inches tall, 9 inches deep, and 14 inches wide and weighs 8.5 pounds empty.

Space Collection suitcase from Arlo Skye
Arlo Skye

Depending on what type of space traveler you are, you can get one of three designs laser-etched on the bottom of your luggage. There's Moon Shot, Team Human, and Occupy Mars; each engraving comes with a short ode to space and a small picture of its respective celestial body. Like other suitcases made by Arlo Skye, these bags are zipper-free and made from polycarbonate with an aluminum frame.

Whether you're a globetrotter or an aspiring astronaut, the Space Collection from Arlo Skye makes a great travel companion.

Buy it from Arlo Skye for $450.

[h/t Condé Nast Traveler]

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Here's How You Can Help Rebuild Paris's Notre-Dame Cathedral

 Kitwood, Getty Images
Kitwood, Getty Images

A fire at Paris’s famed Notre-Dame Cathedral raged for nine hours on Monday, drawing the world’s attention to the partial destruction of one of the best-known cultural monuments on the planet. The efforts of more than 400 firefighters managed to preserve much of the 859-year-old structure, but the roof and spire were destroyed.

Financial support for the building has already come pouring in, with billionaire François-Henri Pinault pledging $113 million toward reconstruction and another billionaire, Bernard Arnault, promising $226 million. A total of roughly $1 billion has come in from donations, but a revitalized Notre-Dame is a considerable expense that could cost even more.

For people who would like to assist, donations are being accepted by the nonprofit French Heritage Society for virtually any amount.

Why will expenses run so high? Prior to the fire, Notre-Dame was in dire need of extensive restoration. Buttresses caused instability to major walls, gargoyles were damaged, and cracks had formed in the now-destroyed spire. The cathedral is owned by the French government, which allots roughly 2 million euros (or about $2.26 million) annually to upkeep. Between the existing wear and the fire, it could take years or possibly decades for the work to be completed.

The publicity surrounding Notre-Dame has also motivated people to assist in rebuilding efforts on a smaller scale, and closer to home. Three churches in Louisiana that were recently targeted in allegedly racist arson attacks saw donations climb from $150,000 to over $1 million following the Notre-Dame fire. You can donate to that GoFundMe campaign here.

[h/t CNN]

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