These Images Can Alter Your Vision For Months

Fredifortakeoff, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 4.0
Fredifortakeoff, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 4.0

Warning: These images may affect your vision for days or even months if you look too long. The damage isn’t irreparable, though, and the worst possible side effect is that you might start seeing colors a little differently, the Indy100 notes.

It’s called the McCollough effect—named after psychologist Celeste McCollough Howard—and one of the earliest studies of this phenomenon dates back to 1975. Researchers separated 16 people into five groups and showed them two different striped patterns featuring the colors red and green.

Red and black horizontal lines

Fredifortakeoff, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 4.0

Vertical green and black lines

Fredifortakeoff, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 4.0

After looking at each image for about three minutes, the test subjects then stared at black and white striped grids. That’s when the effect started to set in, and participants reported seeing a pinkish hue in the black and white images. One test group reported that the effect remained in full force after five days, while the other four groups said they still felt a weakened form of the effects three months later.

An earlier study from 1969 found that only the colors green and red produced this effect. There’s no consensus on what causes it, but some scientists believe it’s related to neurons in the visual cortex, according to IFL Science. Others have suggested that the brain tries to “color-correct” what you’re seeing, while a third theory posits that the effect is a symptom of withdrawal caused by the absence of color.

To get your vision back to normal more quickly, it’s recommended that you stare at the two images of the red and green lines, except with the image turned 90 degrees counter-clockwise. 

[h/t Indy100]

New Harry Potter Scrabble Accepts Wizarding Words Like Hogwarts and Dobby

USAopoly
USAopoly

Patronus, Hogwarts, and Dobby may not be words found in the official Scrabble dictionary, but they are very real to Harry Potter fans. Now there's finally a board game that lets players win points using the magical vocabulary made famous by the Harry Potter books and movies. SCRABBLE: World of Harry Potter from USAopoly is a new edition of Scrabble that recognizes characters, place names, spells, and potions from J.K. Rowling's Wizarding World.

Like traditional Scrabble, players use the letter tiles they pick up to spell out words on the board, with different words earning different point values. Any word you can find in an up-to-date Merriam-Webster Dictionary is still fair game, but in this version, terms coined in Harry Potter qualify as well. First and last names, whether they belong to characters (Albus or Dumbledore, for example) or actors from the franchise (Emma or Watson), are playable. You can also spell magical place names (like Hogsmeade), spells (accio), and objects (snitch).

Harry Potter version of Scrabble.
USAopoly

Showing off the depth of your Harry Potter knowledge isn't the only reason to put wizarding words on the board. Magical words are worth bonus points, with players earning more points the longer the word is. SCRABBLE: World of Harry Potter also includes cards with special challenges for players—a feature that can't be found in any other version of the game.

This Harry Potter edition of Scrabble will be available for $30 at Barnes & Noble and other retailers this spring. Until then, there are plenty of Harry Potter-themed games, including wizarding chess, out there for you to play.

Harry Potter version of Scrabble.
USAopoly

This 1980s Copy of Super Mario Bros. Is One of the Most Expensive Video Games in History

iStock.com/ilbusca
iStock.com/ilbusca

The original Super Mario Bros. changed video games forever when Nintendo released it for the NES in the 1980s, and now it's making history again. As The Verge reports, a mint cartridge from 1985 just sold for $100,150, breaking a world record in video game sales.

Super Mario Bros. was the first game starring Mario that Nintendo released for a home console. Most old copies of the game from the 1980s show noticeable wear, but the item that just sold through Heritage Auctions was a rare find for collectors. The cartridge is still preserved in its sealed case, earning it a "near mint" grade of 9.4 and a A++ "seal rating" from the rare game certifiers Wata Games.

It's also a rare "sticker-sealed" copy that Nintendo created for an exclusive test market launch of the NES in New York and Los Angeles. That, along with the game's pristine condition, helped make it the most expensive graded game ever sold when a group of collectors purchased it for $100,150 at auction.

Super Mario Bros. helped launch a video game franchise and paved the way for some of Nintendo's most famous properties, including Mario Cart and Super Smash Bros. It's one of several old-school NES games that collectors are willing to shell out big bucks for. Stadium Events, the 1990 Nintendo World Championships (one sold in 2014 for $100,088), and the Nintendo Campus Challenge are also very rare and expensive.

[h/t The Verge]

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