This Amazing Pizza Dough Recipe Has Just Three Ingredients, No Kneading Required

iStock
iStock

If you’re anything like most people with functioning taste buds, then you probably call pizza your favorite food. Even if you’ve never made homemade pizza before in your life, there’s another way of getting your margherita fix besides delivery and DiGiorno. Yes, it involves cooking, but anyone can do it.

This pizza dough recipe, via Bon Appétit, calls for just three basic ingredients: flour, sea salt, and active dry yeast. Better yet, the dough can be made three days ahead and chilled. It requires no kneading, which happens to be one of the trickiest parts of baking bread or making pizza. Too much pressing can break down the gluten and leave you with a gooey, shapeless dough, and nobody wants that.

This recipe takes that out of the equation completely. Start by combining 7 1/2 cups of all-purpose flour, 4 teaspoons of fine sea salt, and 1/2 teaspoon of active dry yeast in a bowl and whisking them together. Gradually stir in 3 cups of water until it’s well mixed, and then use your hands to form the dough into a ball.

Transfer the dough to a large bowl, cover it with plastic wrap, and let it rise at room temperature for about 18 hours. The time may vary depending on the temperature—the room should be as close to 72°F as possible—but you’ll know it’s ready to go when the dough is more than twice its original size and you see small bubbles forming on the surface.

Next, cover a counter or flat surface with a little extra flour, plop your dough down, and start working it into a rectangular shape, then divide it into six portions. The next step, described by Bon Appétit, requires a little handiwork, but nothing too challenging:

“Working with one portion at a time, gather four corners to center to create four folds. Turn seam side down and mold gently into a ball. Dust dough with flour; set aside on work surface or a floured baking sheet. Repeat with remaining portions.”

Finally, you can cover the dough with plastic wrap and let it rest for about one hour. Then you’re ready to flatten each ball into a circle, add toppings, and bake it for about 10 minutes at 500°F–550°F. Once you've mastered pizza, you can move on to this easy three-ingredient pasta sauce that's hailed by some as the world's best.

[h/t Bon Appétit]

How Microwaving Food Affects Its Nutritional Value

iStock/grzymkiewicz
iStock/grzymkiewicz

There’s probably no household appliance that sees more use than a microwave. For people who don’t have the time or inclination to prepare dinners from scratch or heat meals in a conventional oven, zapping food has become the ultimate method of time management in the kitchen.

Some people harbor the belief that a price has to be paid for that convenience—specifically, that food loses nutritional value by being subjected to a quick nuking.

The truth? Microwaving doesn’t harm a food’s nutrients. In fact, it may preserve them more than some slow-cook methods do.

The reason is found in how microwaves work. The appliances heat food by blasting it with waves of energy not unlike radio waves. These waves target water and other molecules in the food. Thermal energy quickly builds up, and dishes come out heated in a relatively short period of time. This process avoids two of the factors that can lead to nutrient loss: cooking duration and high temperatures. Typically, the longer and hotter food is cooked, the more its nutritional value dissipates.

The other advantage is that microwaves don’t require water for heating. If you boil broccoli, for example, the hot water allows nutrients to leach out of the vegetable. (While that makes for a good stock, your broccoli may be robbed of some of its healthy benefits.) A quick steam in the microwave leaves broccoli relatively intact.

That’s not to say that microwave cooking is superior to a stovetop. Cooking foods at reasonable temperatures and durations shouldn’t result in significant nutrient loss, though some is inevitable for any manner of cooking. But microwaving isn’t going to erase nutrients via some mysterious microwave alchemy, either.

[h/t CNN]

Golden Girls Cereal Has Arrived

NBC
NBC

Fans of The Golden Girls can now spend their mornings with Dorothy, Blanche, Sophia, and Rose. The ladies of the beloved sitcom now have their own cereal—and it's only available for a limited time, Today reports.

Funko—the toy company known for its vinyl Pop! dolls depicting nearly every character in pop culture (including, of course, The Golden Girls)—rolled out the special-edition cereal in Target stores on September 30. The box is decorated with Funko-fied versions of the four leading ladies, and the multi-grain loops themselves are a shade of deep blue that would look great on one of Rose's dresses.

At $8 a box, the product is more expensive than your average breakfast cereal, but that price includes a little something extra. Each box of Golden Girls cereal comes with its own version of a prize inside: a Funko Pop! figurine of one of the four women.

The cereal won't remain on shelves forever, so collect all the dolls while you still can.

[h/t Today]

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