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11 Offbeat Holidays You Can Celebrate In February

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Sure, Valentine's Day gets all the commercial airtime and drugstore aisle displays come February, but we've rounded up plenty of other quirky holidays to celebrate on the other 27 days.

1. February 7: Bubble Gum Day

Celebrated annually on the first Friday of February, Bubble Gum Day proclaims itself a "FUNdraising Holiday." The occasion, which was started in 2006 by children’s book author Ruth Spiro, allows school children to chew gum—chastisement free—in exchange for 50 cents, which then gets donated to a charity of the school's choice. Since its inception, participation has spread to include libraries, children's museums, and even senior centers.

2. February 8: Laugh and Get Rich Day

It's not clear if the laughter is intended to result in vast fiscal gains or if the two activities are merely suggested as befitting one another with no causal relationship implied.

3. February 9: Man Day

The Sunday before Valentine's Day has been officially reserved as a time for the neglected men of the world to finally get some recognition.

4. February 11: Pro Sports Wives Day

And in continuing the trend of honoring beleaguered subsets of the population comes Pro Sports Wives Day, for the women who support the men who get paid millions to play a game. (There does not appear to be a Pro Sports Husbands Day, for what that's worth.)

5. February 13: Get A Different Name Day

On the 14th, the sentiment "a rose by any other name would smell as sweet" is all about the rose. The day before, however, is all about the other name. This is the annual opportunity for people burdened with silly or undesirable names to insist that they are addressed in some more pleasing way and expect their friends and colleagues to do so.

6. February 13: Madly in Love with Me Day

February 13 is also a great day to celebrate everything, name and otherwise, that you don't hate about yourself.  Conspicuously placed on the calendar, this is a day that makes literal the idea that you must love yourself before you can love another.

7. February 18: Single-Tasking Day

A day to do one, and only one, thing at a time.

8. February 20: Hoodie-Hoo Day

This is one for those of you in the Northern Hemisphere. It's a low commitment holiday: All you have to do is go outside at exactly noon (local time) and yell "Hoodie-hoo." This, supposedly will chase off winter. And frankly, it's about time someone figured out how to do so.

9. February 22: World Sword Swallowers Day

While we're not saying practitioners of the ancient art shouldn't get their own holiday, it's not clear how this is any different from other days, when people who can swallow swords should do just that, and people who can't definitely should not.

10. February 23: Curling is Cool Day

Note: This isn't just Curling Day; this is Curling is Cool Day. This is not a day to make curling the punch line of jokes, but rather an opportunity to embrace the Olympic sport and find out what about it, other than the ice, is so cool.

11: February 28: National Tooth Fairy Day

Don't tell your kids that this is basically the same thing as Mother's Day and Father's Day.

For an even more exhaustive list of holidays, historical anniversaries and notable birthdays, check out Chase's Calendar of Events.



All images courtesy of ThinkStock 

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Live Smarter
Why the Best Time to Book Your Thanksgiving Travel Is Right Now
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You're never going to get a true steal on holiday plane tickets, but if you want to avoid spending your whole salary flying to visit your relatives over Thanksgiving, the time is nigh to start picking seats. That's according to the experts at Condé Nast Traveler, who cite data from Expedia and Skyscanner.

The latter found that it was cheapest to secure Thanksgiving tickets 11 weeks before the holiday. That means that you should have bought your ticket around September 4, but it's not too late; you can still save if you book now. Expedia's data shows that the cheapest time to buy is 61 to 90 days before you leave, so you still have until September 23 to snag a seat on a major airline without paying an obscene premium. (Relatively speaking, of course.)

When major travel holidays aren't involved, data shows that the best time to book a plane ticket is on a Sunday, at least 21 days ahead of your travel. But given that millions of other Americans also want to fly on the exact same days during Thanksgiving and Christmas, the calculus of booking is a bit more high stakes. If you sleep on tickets this month, you could be missing out on hundreds of dollars in savings. In the recent study cited by Condé Nast Traveler, Expedia found that people booking during the 61- to 90-day window saved up to 10 percent off the average ticket price, while last-minute bookers who bought tickets six days or less from their travel day paid up to 20 percent more.

Once you secure those Turkey Day tickets, you've got a new project: Your Christmas flights. By Hopper's estimates, those flights rise in price by $1.50 every day between the end of October and December 15 (after which they get even more expensive). However, playing the waiting game can be beneficial, too. Expedia found that the cheapest time to book Christmas flights was just 14 to 20 days out.

Before you buy, we also recommend checking CheapAir.com, which tracks 11,000 different airfares for flights around the holidays to analyze price trends. Because as miserable as holiday travel can be, you don't want to pay any more than you have to.

[h/t Condé Nast Traveler]

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Big Questions
Why Can’t You Wear White After Labor Day?
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Wearing white in the summer makes sense. Desert peoples have known for thousands of years that white clothing seems to keep you a little bit cooler than other colors. But wearing white only during the summer? While no one is completely sure exactly when or why this fashion rule came into effect, our best guess is that it had to do with snobbery in the late 1800s and early 1900s.

The wives of the super-rich ruled high society with an iron fist after the Civil War. As more and more people became millionaires, though, it was difficult to tell the difference between respectable old money families and those who only had vulgar new money. By the 1880s, in order to tell who was acceptable and who wasn’t, the women who were already “in” felt it necessary to create dozens of fashion rules that everyone in the know had to follow. That way, if a woman showed up at the opera in a dress that cost more than most Americans made in a year, but it had the wrong sleeve length, other women would know not to give her the time of day.

Not wearing white outside the summer months was another one of these silly rules. White was for weddings and resort wear, not dinner parties in the fall. Of course it could get extremely hot in September, and wearing white might make the most sense, but if you wanted to be appropriately attired you just did not do it. Labor Day became a federal holiday in 1894, and society eventually adopted it as the natural endpoint for summer fashion.

Not everyone followed this rule. Even some socialites continued to buck the trend, most famously Coco Chanel, who wore white year-round. But even though the rule was originally enforced by only a few hundred women, over the decades it trickled down to everyone else. By the 1950s, women’s magazines made it clear to middle class America: White clothing came out on Memorial Day and went away on Labor Day.

These days the fashion world is much more relaxed about what colors to wear and when, but every year you will still hear people say that white after Labor Day is unacceptable, all thanks to some snobby millionaires who decided that was a fashion no-no more than 100 years ago.

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