Sylvia Plath's Pulitzer Prize in Poetry Is Up for Auction

Nate D. Sanders Auctions
Nate D. Sanders Auctions

A Pulitzer Prize in Poetry that was awarded posthumously to Sylvia Plath in 1982 for her book The Collected Poems will be auctioned on June 28. The Los Angeles-based Nate D. Sanders Auctions says bidding for the literary document will start at $40,000.

The complete book of Plath’s poetry was published in 1981—18 years after her death—and was edited by her husband, fellow poet Ted Hughes. The Pulitzer Prize was presented to Hughes on Plath’s behalf, and one of two telegrams sent by Pulitzer President Michael Sovern to Hughes read, “We’ve just heard that the Collected Plath has won the Pulitzer Prize. Congratulations to you for making it possible.” The telegrams will also be included in the lot, in addition to an official congratulatory letter from Sovern.

The Pultizer’s jury report from 1982 called The Collected Poems an “extraordinary literary event.” It went on to write, “Plath won no major prizes in her lifetime, and most of her work has been posthumously published … The combination of metaphorical brilliance with an effortless formal structure makes this a striking volume.”

Ted Hughes penned an introduction to the poetry collection describing how Plath had “never scrapped any of her poetic efforts,” even if they weren’t all masterpieces. He wrote:

“Her attitude to her verse was artisan-like: if she couldn’t get a table out of the material, she was quite happy to get a chair, or even a toy. The end product for her was not so much a successful poem, as something that had temporarily exhausted her ingenuity. So this book contains not merely what verse she saved, but—after 1956—all she wrote.”

Also up for auction is Plath’s Massachusetts driver’s license from 1958, at which time she went by the name Sylvia P. Hughes. Bidding for the license will begin at $8000.

Plath's driver's license
Nate D. Sanders Auctions

Beowulf Was Written By One Person, According to Computer Analysis

Justin Sullivan, Getty Images
Justin Sullivan, Getty Images

The poem has been read in classrooms around the world and has influenced countless works of literature, but the identity of the author of Beowulf remains unknown. Scholars can't agree on when exactly the anonymous poet wrote Beowulf, or on whether it was even a single person. Now, a study published in the journal Nature Human Behaviour may finally put one part of that debate to rest. After analyzing the text of the Old English epic, researchers have concluded that Beowulf is the work of one author, the Boston Globe reports.

Written a millennium ago, Beowulf follows a brave hero, the title character, as he slays beasts in Scandinavia, including a monster named Grendel and Grendel's mother. The oldest surviving manuscript dates back to roughly 1000 CE, and there are many competing theories as to its origins.

For their study, researchers from Harvard and other universities used computer algorithms to find patterns in the poem. A type of literary statistic analysis called stylometry was able to break down Beowulf by a number of factors, including meter, breaks, word choice, and the prevalence of certain letter combinations.

The team found that many of the distinguishing style elements of Beowulf are consistent throughout the poem, suggesting that every line came from the same source. But who that one author might have been is still unknown.

Scholars love to speculate on the true authorship of great works—even when there are famous names attached to them. Some experts think that as many as nine writers are really responsible for William Shakespeare's body of work.

[h/t Boston Globe]

25 Classic Books That Have Been Banned

iStock.com/asadykov
iStock.com/asadykov

National Library Week is a time to celebrate the most influential books in literary history. But not every novel that's considered a classic today received instant praise. Many beloved titles had to overcome years of censorship before securing spots on required reading lists and library shelves.

The American Library Association has shared a list of books from the Radcliffe Publishing Course Top 100 Novels of the 20th Century that have been challenged or banned. Of the 100 books, nearly half have received pushback from institutions in the past. Some have been criticized for featuring violence (Beloved), profanity (To Kill a Mockingbird), or controversial political messages (Animal Farm). Even seemingly inoffensive novels have been targeted by censors. (The Lord of the Rings was burned outside a New Mexico church in 2001 for being "satanic.")

Below are 25 of the most popular works of literature from the last century that have been banned from schools, libraries, and, in some cases, entire countries. For even more great books that have been banned, including picture books like Dr. Seuss's The Lorax, check out this list.

  1. The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger

  1. The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck

  1. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

  1. The Color Purple by Alice Walker

  1. Beloved by Toni Morrison

  1. Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell

  1. Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov

  1. Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck

  1. Catch-22 by Joseph Heller

  1. Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

  1. Animal Farm by George Orwell

  1. The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway

  1. As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner

  1. A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway

  1. Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison

  1. Native Son by Richard Wright

  1. One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey

  1. Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut

  1. For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway

  1. The Call of the Wild by Jack London

  1. The Jungle by Upton Sinclair

  1. Lady Chatterley's Lover by D.H. Lawrence

  1. A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess

  1. The Awakening by Kate Chopin

  1. In Cold Blood by Truman Capote

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