The Old Toy Cars Gathering Dust in Your Attic Could Be Worth a Fortune

iStock
iStock

One person's trash is another person's retirement plan. If you've got a box of old toys stashed away in your attic, you could be sitting on a goldmine.

Insurance comparison website GoCompare has put together the below infographic of collectible toy cars that could earn you big bucks if you're willing to part with them. The collectibles are all made by Hot Wheels and Matchbox and are mostly from the 1960s, '70s, and '80s. They range in value from £107 ($141.75) to a whopping £8513 ($11,277.74). The latter price tag belongs to a rare 1961 prototype of Matchbox's Magirus-Deutz Truck, only two of which are believed to exist. (Originally, it was worth less than a buck.)

GoCompare didn't stop at cars: they've also got the financial stats on other childhood toys you could sell for tons of money, including Barbies, Pokémon cards, and LEGOs (sadly, there are no Beanie Babies). Check out their findings below. Here's hoping you have one of these toys to sell so you can put your earnings toward a sweet human-sized ride.

POKÉMON CARDS

Charizard (1st Edition, Base Set): $55,000
Umbreon Gold Star (Pp Series 5): $10,200
Blastoise (1st Edition, Base Set): $9000
Crystal Charizard (Skyridge Holo): $6450
Rayquaza Gold Star (EX Deoxys): $6400

(Prices from 2017 eBay listings. All cards are ones you could reasonably collect. No prize or error cards.)

VIDEO GAMES

Stadium Events (NES): $41,977
Air Raid (Atari 2600): $33,433
Nintendo World Championships (gold): $22,376
Nintendo Campus Challenge: $20,100
Red Sea Crossing (Atari 2600): $13,877

(Prices based on eBay sale data from pricecharting.com and auction figures.)

BARBIE DOLLS

Original Barbie (1959): $23,999
Major Matt Mason (1967): $15,000
#4 Blond Barbie (1960): $8999
Karl Lagerfeld Doll (2014): $6000
American Girl (1966): $3500

(Prices sourced from eBay listings of rare models this year.)

LEGO SETS

Ultimate Collector's Millennium Falcon: $4532
Taj Mahal: $2863
Grand Carousel: $2214
Cafe Corner: $1714
Statue of Liberty: $1699

(Prices sourced from Brickpicker.)

COMIC BOOKS

Action Comics #1 (1938): $3,000,000
Detective Comics #27 (1939): $2,000,000
Superman #1 (1939): $1,000,000
All-American Comics #16 (1940): $747,000
Marvel Comics #1 (1939): $600,000

(Priced in conjunction with comic expert Duncan McAlpine.)

WRESTLING FIGURES

LJN Black Series Macho Man: up to $10,000
Popy Hulk Hogan Rookie Figure: up to $5000
Star Toys Big Boss Man: up to $3000
Hasbro Series Dusty Rhodes: up to $2000
LJN Blue Card Hulk Hogan (White Variant): up to $1500

(Prices sourced from eBay listings of rare models.)

YU-GI-OH! CARDS

Mechanicalchaser: $1600
Blue Eyes White Dragon, Legend of Blue Eyes White Dragon (1st Edition): $1500
Harpie's Feather Duster: $1500
Blue Eyes White Dragon, Dark Duel Stories: $1100
Dark Magician Girl: $1050

(Prices from 2017 eBay listings. All cards are ones you could reasonably collect. No prize or error cards.)

TRANSFORMERS FIGURES

Optimus Prime: $12,000
Computron: $5000
Megatron: $4000
Defensor: $3000
Bumblebee: $2900

(Prices based on sales of mint, sealed figures.)

TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLE FIGURES

Scratch the Cat: $1200
Undercover Raphael: $700
Sixth Scale Bebop and Rocksteady: $600
Hotspot: $574
Rocksteady: $495

(Prices based on auction sales.)

Cone or Cup? Americans Have Very Specific Preferences When It Comes to Eating Ice Cream

Vadym Petrochenko, istock/getty images plus
Vadym Petrochenko, istock/getty images plus

Treating yourself to a cup, cone, bowl, or any other vessel full of ice cream is the perfect way to end a hot summer day (it's not a bad way to start the day either). But do factors such as age, astrological sign, gender, or geography make a difference in terms of how the sweet treat is best enjoyed?

In honor of National Ice Cream Month (which is all of July, in case you haven't been taking advantage), premium wafer brand Loacker surveyed more than 2000 people across the United States to determine their individual ice cream preferences and spot trends. So what did they find out?

According to their survey, three-quarters of Americans like to top their frozen treats with something crunchy, like a wafer, with women being twice as likely to do this than men. Californians, meanwhile, prefer cups to cones. And 81 percent of Americans prefer indulging in an ice-cold dessert with a friend versus chowing down solo.

Loacker even broke down people's ice cream preferences by astrological signs. Does your prediction track? Check out the full infographic below to find out.


Loacker

The 2019 Kentucky Derby: By the Numbers

Rob Carr, Getty Images
Rob Carr, Getty Images

The Kentucky Derby—which is often referred to as the "most exciting two minutes in sports"—will return to Louisville’s Churchill Downs Racetrack for the 145th year on Saturday, May 4th. While the historic horse race itself may not last long, the hoopla surrounding it is a much bigger affair (as are the hats).

So grab a mint julep (120,000 of them are served at the event each year) and take a look at WalletHub's breakdown of the finances and fashions surrounding this year's Kentucky Derby.

Source: WalletHub

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