The Old Toy Cars Gathering Dust in Your Attic Could Be Worth a Fortune

iStock
iStock

One person's trash is another person's retirement plan. If you've got a box of old toys stashed away in your attic, you could be sitting on a goldmine.

Insurance comparison website GoCompare has put together the below infographic of collectible toy cars that could earn you big bucks if you're willing to part with them. The collectibles are all made by Hot Wheels and Matchbox and are mostly from the 1960s, '70s, and '80s. They range in value from £107 ($141.75) to a whopping £8513 ($11,277.74). The latter price tag belongs to a rare 1961 prototype of Matchbox's Magirus-Deutz Truck, only two of which are believed to exist. (Originally, it was worth less than a buck.)

GoCompare didn't stop at cars: they've also got the financial stats on other childhood toys you could sell for tons of money, including Barbies, Pokémon cards, and LEGOs (sadly, there are no Beanie Babies). Check out their findings below. Here's hoping you have one of these toys to sell so you can put your earnings toward a sweet human-sized ride.

POKÉMON CARDS

Charizard (1st Edition, Base Set): $55,000
Umbreon Gold Star (Pp Series 5): $10,200
Blastoise (1st Edition, Base Set): $9000
Crystal Charizard (Skyridge Holo): $6450
Rayquaza Gold Star (EX Deoxys): $6400

(Prices from 2017 eBay listings. All cards are ones you could reasonably collect. No prize or error cards.)

VIDEO GAMES

Stadium Events (NES): $41,977
Air Raid (Atari 2600): $33,433
Nintendo World Championships (gold): $22,376
Nintendo Campus Challenge: $20,100
Red Sea Crossing (Atari 2600): $13,877

(Prices based on eBay sale data from pricecharting.com and auction figures.)

BARBIE DOLLS

Original Barbie (1959): $23,999
Major Matt Mason (1967): $15,000
#4 Blond Barbie (1960): $8999
Karl Lagerfeld Doll (2014): $6000
American Girl (1966): $3500

(Prices sourced from eBay listings of rare models this year.)

LEGO SETS

Ultimate Collector's Millennium Falcon: $4532
Taj Mahal: $2863
Grand Carousel: $2214
Cafe Corner: $1714
Statue of Liberty: $1699

(Prices sourced from Brickpicker.)

COMIC BOOKS

Action Comics #1 (1938): $3,000,000
Detective Comics #27 (1939): $2,000,000
Superman #1 (1939): $1,000,000
All-American Comics #16 (1940): $747,000
Marvel Comics #1 (1939): $600,000

(Priced in conjunction with comic expert Duncan McAlpine.)

WRESTLING FIGURES

LJN Black Series Macho Man: up to $10,000
Popy Hulk Hogan Rookie Figure: up to $5000
Star Toys Big Boss Man: up to $3000
Hasbro Series Dusty Rhodes: up to $2000
LJN Blue Card Hulk Hogan (White Variant): up to $1500

(Prices sourced from eBay listings of rare models.)

YU-GI-OH! CARDS

Mechanicalchaser: $1600
Blue Eyes White Dragon, Legend of Blue Eyes White Dragon (1st Edition): $1500
Harpie's Feather Duster: $1500
Blue Eyes White Dragon, Dark Duel Stories: $1100
Dark Magician Girl: $1050

(Prices from 2017 eBay listings. All cards are ones you could reasonably collect. No prize or error cards.)

TRANSFORMERS FIGURES

Optimus Prime: $12,000
Computron: $5000
Megatron: $4000
Defensor: $3000
Bumblebee: $2900

(Prices based on sales of mint, sealed figures.)

TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLE FIGURES

Scratch the Cat: $1200
Undercover Raphael: $700
Sixth Scale Bebop and Rocksteady: $600
Hotspot: $574
Rocksteady: $495

(Prices based on auction sales.)

What Are Your Chances of Dying from Everyday Activities? Chart Shows The Risks

iStock.com/Gwengoat
iStock.com/Gwengoat

Many of the things that cause people great distress—such as spiders, sharks, plane travel, and elevators—are considered "irrational" fears for a reason. That's because the things that are most likely to off you are far more mundane, as the below infographic spotted by Bored Panda shows.

The information was compiled by Best Health Degrees using data from the National Center for Health Statistics, and the chart outlines your “chances of dying” from scuba diving, bicycling, and traveling by car, among other activities.

Some of the statistics are a little surprising. For example, you’re far more likely to die while canoeing (the risk factor is 1 in 10,000) than while bungee jumping (1 in 500,000). Dance parties are slightly deadlier than skydiving—which is to say, these activities aren’t very dangerous at all. And you’ll probably be safe if you stick to video games, where the risk of death is 1 in 100 million.

The chart wraps everything up with a rather depressing statistic: “Regardless of all of these risks, your probability of dying during a given year doubles every eight years.” So, if you aren’t thoroughly scared to leave your house now, keep scrolling to see more death-related statistics from Best Health Degrees.

Your Chances of Dying

[h/t Bored Panda]

The Best and Worst Airports, Airlines, and Routes to Fly on Thanksgiving

iStock.com/simonkr
iStock.com/simonkr

Traveling around the holidays is always stressful, but depending on where you're starting out and where you're headed, it could be particularly bad. Especially if you're flying out of Oakland, Dallas, or Chicago, according to new data compiled by Treetopia, an online retailer devoted to artificial Christmas trees and wreaths.

Treetopia crunched some numbers to discover the worst airports, airlines, and days to travel around the Thanksgiving holiday, discovering that certain travelers have a much better better shot of having a smooth airport experience than others. In some cases, it could be a matter of going to the airport across town, even. Based on data from last November's holiday travel, here are the worst places to fly out of in late November:

A map of the airports in the U.S. with the worst flight delays on Thanksgiving
Treetopia

In Chicago, for instance, Midway faces some of the worst delays in the country around Thanksgiving, but O'Hare has one of the best track records. In the D.C. area, you're much better off flying out of Dulles (No. 5 on the Best Airports list) than the Baltimore-Washington airport (No. 9 on the Worst Airports list). And in the Bay Area, you want to avoid going to either Oakland (the country's worst airport for Thanksgiving travel, and a regular on most-delayed lists) or San Jose (the fifth worst). Hopefully you can fly out of San Francisco instead.

If you're looking for the most reliable travel experience, below are the best airports and airlines to fly that week, according to Treetopia's numbers.

A map of the best airports for Thanksgiving travel
Treetopia

However, your likelihood of delay is also affected by which airline you're flying with and what route you're traveling on. Shorter routes in particular seem to be at risk of delays—especially if you're flying within California.

Charts of the best and worst air travel routes to fly around Thanksgiving
Treetopia

And here are the airlines you should avoid and the ones you should gravitate toward if you're looking to get to Thanksgiving dinner on time:

Charts of the best and worst airlines to travel with on Thanksgiving
Treetopia

Best of luck at the airport this holiday season! And get ready: Christmas/holiday-travel season is just a few short weeks away.

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