The Honey Smacks In Your Pantry May Be Contaminated With Salmonella

Doc_Brown, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0. Cropped.
Doc_Brown, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0. Cropped.

Salmonella, a bacterial food-borne illness often associated with raw eggs and undercooked chicken, has been linked to a popular children's cereal. According to the BBC, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is urging consumers to avoid Kellogg’s Honey Smacks, citing the brand as the likely cause of the Salmonella outbreak spreading across the U.S.

Since early March, 100 people in 33 states have contracted the virus. News of the cereal's potential contamination first broke in June, when the CDC advised consumers to throw away all boxes of Honey Smacks regardless of size or "best by" date. As of June 14, 73 people in 31 states had already fallen ill with salmonella poisoning.

The CDC writes on its website that "Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicates that Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal is the likely source of this multistate outbreak." On June 14, the Kellogg Company has recalled its 15.3-ounce and 23-ounce boxes of Honey Smacks printed with any "best if used by" date between June 14, 2018 and June 14, 2019 (recalled boxes are labeled on the bottom with the UPC codes 3800039103 or 3800014810).

But the recall hasn't succeeded in containing the illness: It's infected 27 new people since the last update and spread to two new states, Florida and Colorado. The new developments prompted the CDC to issue a forceful warning on Twitter on July 12: "Do not eat this Cereal."

Symptoms of Salmonella include diarrhea, fever, headache, and abdominal pain, and usually appear 12 hours to three days after the contaminated food is ingested. The infection clears up in most people on its own, but in some cases it can lead to hospitalization or even death. So far, 30 people have been hospitalized with zero deaths reported. Of the 65 patients who were questioned, 55 remembered eating cold cereal, and 43 people specifically cited Honey Smacks.

If you haven't checked your cereal shelf yet, scan it for Honey Smacks the next chance you get. The CDC advises tossing it out even if a member of your household has already eaten from the box without getting sick.

[h/t BBC]

We're Hiring a Staff Writer!

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We're looking for a staff writer to join the award-winning Mental Floss team.

Mental Floss has won Webby Awards (three!), lost ASME Awards (thrilled to be nominated!), and published 15 books and five board games. Our YouTube channel has 1.3 million subscribers, and we reach 13 million people a month through mentalfloss.com. Our goal is to find fascinating stories and bring them back to our readers. The kinds of stories people want to share, and not just in the social media sense. There are so many incredibly interesting things out there. Can you help us uncover them?

Staff Writer

We need a writer who is as comfortable covering science as they are pop culture. Primary responsibilities include writing three posts for publication on the site each day as well as writing a number of lists each month; reported features and special projects will also be in the mix.
Ideal candidates will have:

  • One to two years of experience pitching and writing for the web
  • Excellent time management skills, the ability to prioritize, and a high level of attention to detail
  • Energetic, positive written voice
  • Strong research, reporting, and interviewing skills
  • The ability to: conceive, pitch, and execute timely stories on tight deadlines; translate complicated concepts into accessible writing; and generate large volumes of creative story ideas.
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Behr Will Pay Someone $10,000 to Travel the U.S. and Canada in Search of New Paint Colors

Rainbow Row in Charleston, South Carolina
Rainbow Row in Charleston, South Carolina
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Want to add a bit of color and excitement to your life? Behr has just the opportunity for you. The company wants to pay a “Color Explorer” $10,000 to visit vibrant destinations across the U.S. and Canada in search of new hues that will ultimately be turned into actual Behr paints.

“The Behr Color Explorer will kayak the glacial blues of Lake Louise in Banff [Alberta, Canada], people-watch at a vibrant music festival, take in the bold exteriors of Charleston’s Rainbow Row, and experience many more moments of positively pigmented wanderlust in between,” Behr writes in its job description.

Throughout their trip, the Color Explorer will take field notes and plenty of photos, and document their experiences on Behr’s blog and social media. After seeing all there is to see, this person will head to the company’s headquarters in Orange County, California, to work with Behr's marketing team on naming the new colors they uncovered.

Behr's paint names tend to range from the alliterative (see: “Bali Bliss” and “Barely Brown”) to the poetic (“Moth’s Wing”) to the straightforward but still somehow evocative (“Wheat Bread” and “Swiss Coffee”). The company's color of the year for 2019 is called Blueprint.

The ideal Color Explorer will be adventurous, interested in color, and knowledgeable about the latest trends, according to Behr.

In addition to providing a $10,000 stipend, the company will also cover all travel expenses, accommodation, and experiences. Would-be explorers can apply for the gig on Behr’s website by writing a short description of the color that inspires them most before the May 15 deadline. Applicants must be at least 21 years old and residents of the U.S. or Canada, and they must also have a valid passport.

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