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15 Weird Things Celebrities Have Autographed

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We’ve all seen videos of rock stars signing women’s breasts, even their butts. There are even super fans who have celebrity autographs tattooed on their skin. In fact, signing body parts isn’t even that weird these days. Here are a few of the strangest things we could find autographed by celebrities.

1. A Toilet Seat

According to the eBayer who put up this item for sale, Sister Hazel performed a concert at Wingate University a while back. At some point, they needed to use the bathroom, and the eBayer’s apartment was nearby—so as a thank you, they signed his toilet seat. As of the time of this writing, the item is going for $58.50, but there are still four days left for the price to skyrocket.

2. A Dog

NASCAR racer Kasey Kahne says he "thought it was weird to sign a dog. He didn't have much hair, so [I was] signing his back—that was kind of odd." 

3. A Twinkie

What’s weirder than autographing a sealed Twinkie? Going on eBay to bid on a Twinkie you already autographed. But that’s what baseball player David Price did after the Hostess shutdown in 2012. While Yahoo News doesn’t have a report on whether or not the pitcher actually won the Twinkie, or even if he actually bid on it (the final bid ended at $56), he did say in his Twitter account that if he won the item, he would save it and give it to his kids at some point. I don’t know about you, but I can’t think of any more meaningful thing for a father to give his child than a Twinkie he signed.

When asked if that was the weirdest thing he ever signed, Price said that honor went to a baby’s forehead.

4. A Grilled Cheese

Los Angeles Kings (and Team USA) goalie Jonathan Quick says someone once asked him to sign a grilled cheese sandwich. "It wouldn't be that bad if it was still intact, but there were two bites taken out of it, and he handed it to me," Quick said. "There was still saliva on it. So that was kinda weird."

5. Babies

As it turns out, people asking professional athletes to sign their babies isn’t as rare as you might think. Here’s a photo from @NBASummerLeague of NBA player Nate Robinson signing one, though I suppose he should be glad it’s only the kid’s back.

According to basketball player Marcin Gortat, “I recently signed a forehead of a freshly born baby, which was ridiculous. And I said, ‘Why would you want to do that?’ and the lady said, ‘It’s gonna be a sign he’s gonna be a basketball player.’ So, for some reason, I don’t know why I signed it, why I did it, I felt bad for this kid. But at the end of the day I realized I would never do this again.” Probably a good policy.

6. A Fast Food Container

Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco autographs a lot of stuff. But the weirdest, he says, was a Filet-O-Fish box from McDonald's.

7. A Diaper

For those who want the powers and prowess of a top athlete to wear off on their infant, but don’t want their babies to be signed directly, there’s always diapers. And during the last Olympic games, one lucky fan was able to win a diaper autographed by U.S. Olympic goldmedalistsr Noelle Pikus-Pace and Chad Hedrick courtesy of And Twins Make 5. No word on whether or not the winner actually used the diaper on their baby or not.

8. A Tampon


Photo courtesy ofReddit user CreativelyBankrupt

You might not have ever heard of The FP and you might not ever see the movie. But while the filmmakers, the Trost Bros., may not be household names, there’s still a reason you might care about their autographs—they come on a tampon when you buy the DVD from Drafthouse films. Apparently, there’s a meaningful scene in the movie involving a tampon.

9. A Jock Strap

Rugby player Ben Cohen once signed a jock strap, but that’s not quite as dirty as it sounds—he signed it for a charity auction to support GMFA, a gay men’s health charity in Britain. The jock strap must have garnered some good interest because it went for $460.

10. Underwear

Speaking of undergarments, Baseball Hall of Famer Jim Palmer once signed a pair of underwear (unworn, though), which were sold on eBay last August. In case you’re wondering how much a pair of autographed tighty-whiteys can go for, these specific ones sold for $69.99.

11. A Leather Whip

Hockey player Karl Alzner of the Washington Capitals says he was once asked to sign a woman’s leather whip. "It was odd," he said. "I don’t know what it was for and I don’t want to think about it."

12. A Sock

You have to be a real fan to want a sock signed by your favorite athlete. Oddly, professional wrestler Mick Foley actually autographed a number socks at one point—enough to have them individually numbered and sold on the Walmart website.

Foley’s socks were new though, but a recent eBay auction had a listing for a game-worn autographed sock from NHL player John McIntyre. Apparently even the most diehard fans know how bad a sock shoved in hockey skates for a whole game will smell, because this one-of-a-kind piece of sports memorabilia only went for $21.

13. A Vibrator

Lots of ladies love Sons of Anarchy star Charlie Hunnam, but only one of them was happy to have him sign their vibrator and post a photo of it on Tumblr. If you’re wondering what an actor might write on such an item, Charlie scribbled out “Have Fun." For the sake of being SFW, I’m going to omit this image, but if you want to see him autographic the item in question or the finished signature, just visit the River of Life Tumblr link here.

14. A Prosthetic Leg

Mark McGwire, one of the all-time home run hitting champions of baseball, once signed a fan’s prosthetic leg.

15. A Car Dashboard

San Jose Sharks' Dan Boyle once autographed the dashboard of a car for a fan—and not just any car, but a really nice, expensive one. "It was like, an Aston Martin or something," he said.

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8 Gonzo Facts About Hunter S. Thompson
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Hunter S. Thompson in Gonzo: The Life and Work of Hunter S. Thompson (2008)
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Like any real-life legend, there are many myths surrounding the life and work of Hunter S. Thompson. But in Thompson’s case, most of those stories—particularly the more outlandish ones—are absolutely true. The founder of the “Gonzo journalism” movement is one of the most fascinating figures of the 20th century. In celebration of what would have been his 80th birthday, here are some things you might not have known about the eccentric writer.

1. HE WAS NAMED AFTER A FAMOUS SCOTTISH SURGEON.

Hunter S. Thompson was reportedly named after one of his mother’s ancestors, a Scottish surgeon named Nigel John Hunter. But Hunter wasn't just your run-of-the-mill surgeon. In a 2004 interview with the Independent, Thompson brought along a copy of The Reluctant Surgeon, a Biography of Nigel John Hunter, a biography of his namesake, which read: "A gruff Scotsman, Hunter has been described as the most important naturalist between Aristotle and Darwin, the Shakespeare of medicine and the greatest man the British ever produced. He was the first to trace the lymphatic system. He performed the first human artificial insemination. He was the greatest collector of anatomical specimens in history. He prescribed the orthopaedic shoe that allowed Lord Byron to walk."

When pressed about what that description had to do with him, Thompson responded: "Well, I guess that might be the secret of my survival. Good genes."

2. HE MISSED HIS HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION … BECAUSE HE WAS IN JAIL.

Just a few weeks before he was set to graduate from high school, at the age of 17, Thompson was charged as an accessory to robbery and sentenced to 60 days in jail. 

“One night Ralston Steenrod, who was in the Athenaeum with Hunter, was driving, and Hunter and another guy he knew were in the car,” Thompson’s childhood friend Neville Blakemore recalled of the incident. “As they were driv­ing through Cherokee Park, the other guy said, ‘Stop. I want to bum a ciga­rette from that car.’ People used to go park and neck at this spot. And the guy got out and apparently went back and mugged them. The guy who was mugged got their license number and traced the car, and within a very short time they were all three arrested.

“Just before this Hunter had been blamed for a nighttime gas-station rob­bery,” Blakemore added, “and before that he and some friends got arrested for buying booze under­age at Abe's Liquor Store on Frankfort Avenue by the tracks. So Hunter had a record, and he was already on probation. He was given an ultimatum: jail or the military. And Hunter took the Air Force. He didn't graduate with his class.”

3. IT WAS A FELLOW JOURNALIST WHO COINED THE TERM “GONZO.”

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While covering the 1968 New Hampshire primary, Thompson met fellow writer and editor Bill Carodoso, editor of The Boston Globe Sunday Magazine, which is where Thompson first heard him use the word “Gonzo.” “It meant sort of ‘crazy’ or ‘off-the-wall,’” Thompson said in Anita Thompson’s Ancient Gonzo Wisdom: Interviews with Hunter S. Thompson. Two years later, in June 1970, Thompson wrote an article for Scanlan’s Monthly entitled “The Kentucky Derby Is Decadent and Depraved,” which became a game-changing moment in journalism because of its offbeat, slightly manic style that was written with first-person subjectivity.

Among the many fellow journalists who praised Thompson for the piece was Cardoso, who sent a letter to Thompson that “said something like, ‘Forget all the sh*t you’ve been writing, this is it; this is pure Gonzo.’ Gonzo. Yeah, of course. That’s what I was doing all the time. Of course, I might be crazy.” Thompson ran with the word, and would use it himself for the first time a year later, in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas.

4. HE TYPED OUT FAMOUS NOVELS TO LEARN THE ART OF WRITING.

In order to get the “feel” of being a writer, Thompson used to retype his favorite novels in full. “[H]is true model and hero was F. Scott Fitzgerald,” Louis Menand wrote in The New Yorker. “He used to type out pages from The Great Gatsby, just to get the feeling, he said, of what it was like to write that way, and Fitzgerald’s novel was continually on his mind while he was working on Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, which was published, after a prolonged and agonizing compositional nightmare, in 1972.”

"If you type out somebody's work, you learn a lot about it,” Thompson told Charlie Rose in 1997. “Amazingly it's like music. And from typing out parts of Faulkner, Hemingway, Fitzgerald—these were writers that were very big in my life and the lives of the people around me—so yeah, I wanted to learn from the best I guess."

5. HE RAN FOR SHERIFF IN COLORADO.

In 1970, Thompson ran for sheriff of Pitkin County, Colorado on what he called the Freak Power ticket. Among his political tactics: shaving his head so that he could refer to his opponent as his “long-haired opponent,” promising to eat mescaline while on duty, and campaigning to rename Aspen “Fat City” to deter "greed heads, land-rapers, and other human jackals from capitalizing on the name 'Aspen.'" Unfortunately, he lost.

6. HE STOLE A MEMENTO FROM ERNEST HEMINGWAY.

In 1964, three years after Ernest Hemingway committed suicide at his cabin in Ketchum, Idaho, Thompson traveled to the late author’s home in order to write “What Lured Hemingway to Ketchum?” While there, according to his widow, Hunter “got caught up in the moment” and took “a big pair of elk horns over the front door.” Last year, more than a decade after Thompson’s death, Anita returned the antlers to the Hemingway family—which is something she and Hunter had always planned to do. “They were warm and kind of tickled … they were so open and grateful, there was no weirdness,” Anita said.

7. HE ONCE USED THE INSIDE OF MUSICIAN JOHN OATES’ COLORADO CABIN AS HIS PERSONAL PARKING SPACE.

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Earlier this month, musician John Oates—the latter half of Hall & Oates—shared a story about his ranch in Woody Creek, Colorado, just outside of Aspen, which is currently on the market for $6 million. In an interview with Colorado Public Radio, Oates recalled how when he first purchased the cabin, there was a red convertible parked inside. “I happened to ask the real estate agent who owned the convertible, and he said ‘your neighbor Hunter Thompson,’” Oates said. “Why is he keeping his car in a piece of property he doesn’t own? The real estate agent looked at me and said ‘It’s Woody Creek, you’ll figure this out. It’s a different kind of place.’” After sending several letters to his neighbor to retrieve his vehicle, Oates took matters into his own hands and deposited the car on Thompson’s lawn. Oates said that the two became friends, but never mentioned the incident.

8. AT HIS FUNERAL, HIS ASHES WERE SHOT OUT OF A CANNON.

On February 20, 2005—at the age of 67—Thompson committed suicide. But Thompson wasn’t about to leave this world quietly. In August of that year, in accordance with his wishes, Thompson's ashes were shot into the air from a cannon while fireworks filled the sky.

“He loved explosions," his widow, Anita, told ESPN, which wrote that, “The private celebration included actors Bill Murray and Johnny Depp, rock bands, blowup dolls and plenty of liquor to honor Thompson, who killed himself six months ago at the age of 67.”

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15 Memorable Quotes from George A. Romero
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Hollywood has lost one of its most iconic horror innovators with the death of George A. Romero, who passed away on Sunday at the age of 77. “He died peacefully in his sleep, following a brief but aggressive battle with lung cancer, and leaves behind a loving family, many friends, and a filmmaking legacy that has endured, and will continue to endure, the test of time,” his manager, Chris Roe, said in a statement.

Though he rose to prominence as the master of zombie flicks, beginning with Night of the Living Dead, Romero honed his filmmaking skills on a far less frightening set: shooting bits for Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood.

“I still joke that 'Mr. Rogers Gets a Tonsillectomy' is the scariest film I’ve ever made,” Romero once said. “What I really mean is that I was scared sh*tless while I was trying to pull it off.” (Rogers returned the favor by being a longtime champion of Romero’s work—and even called Dawn of the Dead “a lot of fun.”)

It’s that high-spirited sense of fun that made Romero’s work so iconic—and kept the New York City native busy for nearly 50 years. To celebrate his life and career, here are 15 of his most memorable quotes on everything from the humanity of zombies to the horror of Hollywood producers.

ON THE IMPORTANCE OF HAVING A SENSE OF HUMOR

“For a Catholic kid in parochial school, the only way to survive the beatings—by classmates, not the nuns—was to be the funny guy.”

ON THE HOLLYWOOD WAY

“If I fail, the film industry writes me off as another statistic. If I succeed, they pay me a million bucks to fly out to Hollywood and fart.”

ON BEING PIGEONHOLED

“As a filmmaker you get typecast just as much as an actor does, so I'm trapped in a genre that I love, but I'm trapped in it!”

ON ZOMBIES AS A METAPHOR

“I also have always liked the monster within idea. I like the zombies being us. Zombies are the blue-collar monsters.”

ON FINDING OBJECTIVITY AS A FILMMAKER

“There are so many factors when you think of your own films. You think of the people you worked on it with, and somehow forget the movie. You can't forgive the movie for a long time. It takes a few years to look at it with any objectivity and forgive its flaws.”

ON THE REAL VALUE OF THE INTERNET

“What the Internet's value is that you have access to information but you also have access to every lunatic that's out there that wants to throw up a blog.”

ON THE HORROR OF DEALING WITH PRODUCERS

“I'll never get sick of zombies. I just get sick of producers.”

ON THE IMPORTANCE OF COLLABORATION

“Collaborate, don’t dictate.”

ON THE BEAUTY OF LOW-BUDGET MOVIEMAKING

“I don't think you need to spend $40 million to be creepy. The best horror films are the ones that are much less endowed.”

ON HUMANS BEING THE REAL VILLAINS

“My zombies will never take over the world because I need the humans. The humans are the ones I dislike the most, and they're where the trouble really lies.”

ON BEING IMMUNE TO TRENDS

“Somehow I've been able to keep standing and stay in my little corner and do my little stuff and I'm not particularly affected by trends or I'm not dying to make a 3-D movie or anything like that. I'm just sort of happy to still be around.”

ON THE HUMANITY OF HORROR

“My stories are about humans and how they react, or fail to react, or react stupidly. I'm pointing the finger at us, not at the zombies. I try to respect and sympathize with the zombies as much as possible.”

ON THE ENDURING APPEAL OF HORROR

“If one horror film hits, everyone says, 'Let's go make a horror film.' It's the genre that never dies.”

ON THE IMPORTANCE OF SURROUNDING ZOMBIES WITH STUPID PEOPLE

“A zombie film is not fun without a bunch of stupid people running around and observing how they fail to handle the situation.”

ON LIFE AFTER DEATH

“I'm like my zombies. I won't stay dead!”

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