For Pizza's Sake: Domino's is Filling America's Potholes To Protect Their Pies

William West, AFP/Getty Images
William West, AFP/Getty Images

If there's one thing that Domino's cares about, it's the integrity of their pizza. No longer will they overlook the casualties of delivery—all those sad, squished pies and those toppings tossed to and fro along a bumpy backroad. The pizza chain is getting to the root of the problem and cracking down on potholes.

As Jalopnik reports, Domino's "Paving For Pizza" program has already hired road crews to patch up potholes in a number of U.S. cities, including 40 holes in Milford, Delaware, and 150 holes in Athens, Georgia. They've also hit California and Texas, and they're not exactly subtle about it, either. In place of a crater, Domino's leaves behind a patch of asphalt containing the brand's logo and the words "Oh yes we did."

The Paving For Pizza website features a "pothole impact meter" with footage showing the degree of "irreversible damage" that different road conditions—from mild to "catastrophic"—can do to a hapless pizza pie. Viewers be warned: This may be painful to watch.

Regardless of whether you're a Domino's devotee or more of a Pizza Hut fan, everyone wins when the roads are smoother. You can nominate your town to be the next stop on the national Paving For Pizza tour by clicking this link.

[h/t Jalopnik]

A Ring Containing a Lock of Charlotte Brontë’s Hair Found Its Way to Antiques Roadshow

Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

A ring that “very likely” contains a lock of Charlotte Brontë’s hair appeared on a recent episode of the Antiques Roadshow that was filmed in northern Wales, according to The Guardian. The jewelry itself isn’t especially valuable; the TV show's appraiser, jewelry specialist Geoffrey Munn, said he would have priced it at £25, or about $32.

However, an inscription of the Jane Eyre author’s name as well as the year she died (1855) raises the value to an estimated £20,000 ($26,000). That isn’t too shabby, considering that the owner found the ring among her late father-in-law’s belongings in the attic.

A section of the ring comes unhinged to reveal a thin strand of hair inside—but did it really belong to one of the famous Brontë sisters? Munn seems to think so, explaining that it was not uncommon for hair to be incorporated into jewelry in the 19th century.

“There was a terror of not being able to remember the face and character of the person who had died,” he said. “Hair wreaths” and other pieces of "hair work" were popular ways of paying tribute to deceased loved ones in England and America from the 17th century to the early 20th century.

In this case, the hair inside the ring was finely braided. Munn went on to add, “It echoes a bracelet Charlotte wore of her two sisters’ hair … So it’s absolutely the focus of the mid- to late 19th century and also the focus of Charlotte Brontë.”

The Brontë Society & Brontë Parsonage Museum, which has locks of Brontë’s hair in its collection, said that it had no reason to doubt the authenticity of the ring.

[h/t The Guardian]

From Cocaine to Chloroform: 28 Old-Timey Medical Cures

YouTube
YouTube

Is your asthma acting up? Try eating only boiled carrots for a fortnight. Or smoke a cigarette. Have you got a toothache? Electrotherapy might help (and could also take care of that pesky impotence problem). When it comes to our understanding of medicine and illnesses, we’ve come a long way in the past few centuries. Still, it’s always fascinating to take a look back into the past and remember a time when cocaine was a common way to treat everything from hay fever to hemorrhoids.

In this week's all-new edition of The List Show, Mental Floss editor-in-chief Erin McCarthy is highlighting all sorts of bizarre, old-timey medical cures. You can watch the full episode below.

For more episodes like this one, be sure to subscribe here.

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