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YouTube / Kirby Ferguson
YouTube / Kirby Ferguson

This is Not a Conspiracy Theory

YouTube / Kirby Ferguson
YouTube / Kirby Ferguson

Kirby Ferguson has been making wonderful bite-sized documentaries for years. His latest project is This is Not a Conspiracy Theory, a documentary film released in parts, examining the phenomenon of the conspiracy theory in culture.

In this first short installment, Ferguson traces the origin of the conspiracy theory to a certain assassination in November, 1963. This is well worth a look, and I can't wait for the rest of the series. Have a look:

I saw an early cut of this some months back at a festival. I think it's going to be great -- crop circles, Roswell, The Matrix, Bigfoot, all cut from the same psychological cloth? Sign me up.

(If you're curious about that teaser at the very end, go watch this.)

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History
5 Intriguing Details Found in the Newly Released JFK Assassination Papers
Keystone/Getty Images
Keystone/Getty Images

JFK assassination conspiracy theorists just got a major windfall, but so did history buffs. In 1992, Congress passed a law that ordered all federal agencies to transfer any records they had pertaining to the investigation into the assassination of John F. Kennedy to the National Archives. The vast majority of those records were declassified before this, but some were withheld or redacted. But the JFK Assassination Records Collection Act stipulated that all records that had been withheld, either partially or in full, would be released to the public 25 years later, on October 26, 2017.

Well, the time has come to open up the files, and there is plenty of intriguing content in the 2800 newly released documents to sift through. (At the last minute, the government withheld 300 more documents, which will have to undergo classified review over the next six months.) Here are five things we’ve learned so far—not all about the assassination itself—from the documents.

1. IN THE WAKE OF THE ASSASSINATION, THE FBI SOUGHT INFO FROM A STRIPPER’S UNION.

As the Boston TV station WCVB spotted, an FBI memo [PDF] from January 1964 detailed the agency’s search for a stripper connected to Jack Ruby, the nightclub owner who killed Lee Harvey Oswald. The FBI was trying to determine the identity of the performer, who went by the stage name “Candy Cane,” but only knew that her first name was Kitty. They went as far as to contact the American Guild of Variety Artists in New Orleans, who told them that one performer by that name had died several months before the JFK assassination, and the only other (whose real name was Vivian) had seemed to have left town sometime after paying her August union dues. The memo doesn’t say just how Ruby and Candy Cane were related or if they ever tracked her down.

2. THE SOVIETS WORRIED THE WHOLE THING WAS A COUP.

The USSR was no fan of the U.S., obviously, but the Soviets didn’t cheer JFK’s death. The news “was greeted with shock and consternation and church bells were tolled in the memory of President Kennedy” in the USSR, a Soviet source reported. Communist Party officials, for one, went on high alert, worrying that it was part of some far-right coup.

“They felt that those elements interested in utilizing the assassination and playing on anticommunist sentiments in the United States would then utilize this act to stop negotiations with the Soviet Union, attack Cuba, and therefore spread the war,” the FBI memo [PDF] from December 1966 states. And even if it wasn’t part of a larger plan, they thought it could still lead to big trouble: “Soviet officials were worried that without leadership, some irresponsible general in the United States might launch a missile at the Soviet Union.”

Plus, they were very much of the 'devil you know' mindset. Soviet diplomats understood JFK and respected that he had “to some degree, a mutual understanding with the Soviet Union” and a desire for peace between the two powers, and they had no idea what to expect from Vice President Lyndon Johnson. “The Soviet Union would have preferred to have had President Kennedy at the helm of the American government,” the memo said, citing the USSR’s UN representative Nikolai T. Fedorenko.

3. THE SOVIETS CALLED OSWALD A “NEUROTIC MANIAC.”

In 1959, long before Kennedy's assassination, Oswald had traveled to the Soviet Union. Shortly after arriving, he contacted the KGB asking to defect, but the Soviet spy agency “decided he was mentally unstable and informed him he had to return to the United States upon completion of his visit.” He was hospitalized after cutting his wrists in his Moscow hotel room, and was allowed to remain in Russia for some time afterward, even marrying a Russian woman. After he returned to the U.S., he sent a request through the Soviet embassy in Mexico just a few months before the assassination, asking to come back to the USSR.

In the wake of the assassination, the USSR reiterated that it wanted nothing to do with Oswald, and never recruited him for espionage. “Soviet officials claimed that Lee Harvey Oswald had no connection whatsoever with the Soviet Union,” the memo states. “They described him as a neurotic maniac who was disloyal to his own country and never belonged to any organization.”

4. THE CUBAN GOVERNMENT WAS KIND OF GIDDY.

Perhaps unsurprisingly—what with all of those assassination plots, invasion attempts, and blockades—the Cubans were pretty stoked to see JFK go. “The initial reaction of Cuban Ambassador Cruz and his staff to report of assassination President was one of happy delight,” a CIA source reported on November 27, 1963 [PDF]. However, the Cubans realized that undisguised glee wasn’t going to be a good look for them. “Cruz thereupon issued instructions to his staff and to Cuban consulates and trade offices in Toronto and Montreal to ‘cease looking happy in public,’” the memo says.

5. THE CIA ONCE TRIED TO HIRE THE MOB TO KILL FIDEL CASTRO.

The CIA’s foiled plots to kill the Soviet-aligned Cuban leader Fidel Castro are well known, but somewhat tangential to the assassination of JFK lies yet another misguided attempt to bump off Castro. In a top secret report [PDF] prepared during Gerald Ford’s administration, the agency admits that it tried to recruit the Mob to help. In “Phase I” of the assassination plot, formed sometime in 1960 or 1961, the CIA plotted to make poison botulism pills, then get members of the Mafia to deliver them to Cuba, into the hands of someone who could drop them into Castro’s drink. They tested out the pills on guinea pigs to make sure they worked, and set aside the money to make it happen.

In 1960, the CIA reached out to Chicago mobster Sam Giancana through an intermediate, and the agency approved a $150,000 payment for whatever contact in Cuba actually accomplished the task. The mobsters didn’t get any money, and they repeatedly said they didn’t want any, anyway—they were just looking to get back into the Havana gambling business. The “asset” assigned to slip the pills to Castro got scared, though, and didn’t actually do it, even though he worked in the Cuban prime minister’s office and had access. Then the CIA recruited a staffer at a restaurant Castro frequented, but by the time the pills arrived, Castro had stopped going there.

The plot was called off after the Bay of Pigs fiasco, and in 1967, J. Edgar Hoover sent the U.S. Attorney General a memo that referred to the plot as the CIA’s “intentions to send hoodlums to Cuba to assassinate Castro.”

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Mary, Queen of Scots Not a Murderer, Inquiry Finds
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Scottish experts have handed down their judgment on a crime that occurred almost 450 years ago. Mary, Queen of Scots has been exonerated of any involvement in her husband’s murder in 1567 by a group of investigators convened by the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

After the death of her first husband, King Francis II of France, Mary returned to Scotland and married her cousin, the earl of Darnley. Lord Darnley later died in the wake of a mysterious explosion, and Mary has always been suspected in the plot—not least because she married one of the main suspects, James Hepburn, just three months later.

Darnley was not your average innocent victim. He was a jealous, violent man, who had killed Mary’s secretary, David Rizzio, the year before. In front of the pregnant queen, Darnley stabbed Rizzio 56 times because he believed Rizzio and Mary were having an affair. When Darnley himself was found dead in his nightshirt, it made sense that the crime was retribution of some sort for Rizzio's murder. 

A 1567 drawing of the crime scene. Image Credit: National Archives via Wikipedia // Public Domain

Modern experts examined drawings of the location of the murder, Kirk o’Field in Edinburgh, and a recreation image of the crime scene based on original sketches. They determined that Darnley’s body, along with his squire’s, had been dragged into the orchard after a mysterious explosion struck his house. Their injuries didn’t indicate that they had died in the explosion, though—they seemed to have been strangled or suffocated.

The investigators, led by forensic anthropologist Sue Black of the University of Dundee, concluded that the murder wasn't arranged by Mary to make room for a new romantic alliance. Instead, they believe the killing was carried out by Darnley’s own relatives, who were angry about his involvement in Rizzio’s murder and needed to keep the powerful, out-of-control noble in check.

[h/t: Scottish Legal News]

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