A New Jersey Real Estate Sign Lost in Hurricane Sandy Just Washed Ashore in France

iStock
iStock

In 2012, during the destruction of Hurricane Sandy, a New Jersey real estate sign went missing. The sign was torn from its post in front of a waterfront home in Brielle and washed away to an unknown location. Now, almost six years later, it has shown up—in France.

According to The New York Times, the sign from Diane Turton, Realtors, a Jersey Shore real estate firm, washed ashore on a French beach near Bordeaux. Hannes Frank was walking along Plage du Pin Sec when he spotted the sign, a little worse for wear but still legible. He emailed the realtors about his find and included pictures of the broken sign in the sand.

The plastic sign traveled approximately 3595 miles during its years-long journey. An oceanographer suggested to The New York Times that it could have crossed the Atlantic Ocean multiple times before Frank found it, estimating that it would take about a year and a half for an object to drift from New Jersey to France. A floating real-estate sign could travel about seven miles per day, expert Curtis Ebbesmeyer told the newspaper.

Due to ocean currents, odd objects wash up on beaches all the time from far-flung coasts. Besides your average message-in-a-bottle finds, beachcombers regularly discover possessions washed away in tsunamis and goods that have fallen off cargo ships or been lost in shipwrecks. For instance, in 1992, a cargo ship accidentally spilled 28,000 rubber ducks into the North Pacific; they floated thousands of miles over the course of more than a decade, ending up as far away as Europe. LEGO toys that fell overboard from a container ship during a storm in 1997 are still washing up on English beaches today. Figuring out where these toys and drifting objects end up can help scientists study ocean currents and drift patterns.

But for the most part, the original owners rarely get photo updates about where their lost goods end up.

[h/t The New York Times]

Duolingo Adds Two Endangered Languages to Course Offerings

iStock
iStock

One of the most precious assets a culture has is its language. There are roughly 7500 distinct languages spoken around the world today, but nearly half of them are at risk of disappearing for good. A way to preserve dying languages is to boost their visibility—which, thanks to the educational app Duolingo, is now happening with Navajo and Hawaiian, TIME reports.

As of October 8, Indigenous People's Day, Duolingo now offers courses in the two languages. Most languages taught through the free app's bite-sized lessons—like English, Spanish, and Chinese—are widely spoken around the world. A few years, ago Duolingo began experimenting with using its tech to share the world's less popular languages with more speakers. When it launched its Irish language course in 2014, there were roughly 100,000 native Irish speakers on Earth; around 4 million people have been exposed to the language through the app since then.

For its two latest language offerings, Duolingo chose to focus on indigenous languages that have been pushed to the brink of extinction by colonization. Even though Navajo, or Diné, is one of the more popular surviving Native American languages, only around 150,000 people speak it today. The Hawaiian language, Ōlelo Hawaiʻi, has about 1000 native speakers and 8000 people who speak and understand it fluently. Both languages were banned in American schools in recent centuries, which greatly contributed to their declines.

Duolingo's new project is only one example of how technology is being used to preserve and revive ancient languages. In 2013, Aili Keskitalo, president of the Sami Parliament in Norway, launched a social media campaign encouraging people to share messages in Sami using hashtags like #speaksamitome; a few years ago, Aboriginal artist Angelina Joshua produced a video game around the Marra language called My Grandmother’s Lingo.

[h/t TIME]

Peter Dinklage Just Hinted That Tyrion Will Die in Game of Thrones

HBO
HBO

​If there's one thing HBO's Game of Thrones has done in the seven seasons it's been on the air, it's ​completely disrupt fan expectations. Tropes that worked in the original books, like killing off major characters almost randomly, were assumed not to translate well to television until the first season of the show killed off presumed series protagonist Ned Stark.

And now star Peter Dinklage has horrified fans by just suggesting that his character, ​Tyrion Lannister, might not make it out of the upcoming eighth and final season of the show alive. In an interview with ​Vulture, Dinklage stated, "I think [Tyrion] was given a very good conclusion. No matter what that is. Death can be a great way out."

Though he could be indulging in the traditional Game of Thrones style of answering interview questions, a.k.a. keep everything vague and leave as many possible interpretations as possible, it's completely within the realm of possibility that ​Tyrion will leave the show at the end of a blade. If that's the case, many fans agree it will no doubt be held by his sister and apparent rival, Cersei, who currently sits on the Iron Throne.

Cersei has always been cautions and resentful of Tyrion due to a prophecy that stated she would die by the hand of a "little brother," whom she believes to be her dwarf younger sibling. A prominent fan theory states that Cersei will kill Tyrion, which will in turn give their brother and Cersei's twin Jaime the motivation to overcome his love of Cersei and slay her.

Dinklage, for his part, doesn't seem too torn up about the prospect of Tyrion dying, saying he felt the character had a good trajectory over the seasons. "He used his position as the outcast of his family like an adolescent would," the actor shared. "The beauty of Tyrion is that he grew out of that mode in a couple of seasons and developed a strong sense of responsibility."

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