Work From Home? Vermont Will Pay You Up to $10,000 to Move There

iStock
iStock

Do you work remotely, like cold winters, and have the freedom to pack your bags and move whenever you’d like? If you answered yes to all three questions, Vermont wants to claim you as one of its own.

On May 30, Governor Phil Scott of Vermont signed a bill into law that will award up to $10,000 to remote workers who move to Vermont beginning in 2019, Quartz reports. To be considered for a grant, you must be a full-time employee of a business based outside of Vermont and primarily work from home or out of a co-working space. The unorthodox measure is aimed at countering the state’s aging population and giving the tax base a much-needed boost.

The grants, intended to offset the cost of relocation and work expenses, will be awarded to 100 new workers each year from 2019 to 2021, and 20 new workers will be supported each subsequent year, according to The Hill. The grants are available on a first-come, first-served basis to those who move to Vermont on or after January 1, 2019.

Grant recipients will receive up to $5000 per year, based on their individual expenses, and up to $10,000 total throughout the course of the program.

Not quite ready to book that one-way ticket to the Green Mountain State? You can try another one of Vermont’s programs called “Stay to Stay Weekends,” which connects visitors with local employers and realtors to give them a feel for the neighborhood. June 1-4, August 10-13, and October 19-22 are the next upcoming weekends, and three communities—Brattleboro, Manchester, and Rutland—are participating.

[h/t Quartz]

Duolingo Adds Two Endangered Languages to Course Offerings

iStock
iStock

One of the most precious assets a culture has is its language. There are roughly 7500 distinct languages spoken around the world today, but nearly half of them are at risk of disappearing for good. A way to preserve dying languages is to boost their visibility—which, thanks to the educational app Duolingo, is now happening with Navajo and Hawaiian, TIME reports.

As of October 8, Indigenous People's Day, Duolingo now offers courses in the two languages. Most languages taught through the free app's bite-sized lessons—like English, Spanish, and Chinese—are widely spoken around the world. A few years, ago Duolingo began experimenting with using its tech to share the world's less popular languages with more speakers. When it launched its Irish language course in 2014, there were roughly 100,000 native Irish speakers on Earth; around 4 million people have been exposed to the language through the app since then.

For its two latest language offerings, Duolingo chose to focus on indigenous languages that have been pushed to the brink of extinction by colonization. Even though Navajo, or Diné, is one of the more popular surviving Native American languages, only around 150,000 people speak it today. The Hawaiian language, Ōlelo Hawaiʻi, has about 1000 native speakers and 8000 people who speak and understand it fluently. Both languages were banned in American schools in recent centuries, which greatly contributed to their declines.

Duolingo's new project is only one example of how technology is being used to preserve and revive ancient languages. In 2013, Aili Keskitalo, president of the Sami Parliament in Norway, launched a social media campaign encouraging people to share messages in Sami using hashtags like #speaksamitome; a few years ago, Aboriginal artist Angelina Joshua produced a video game around the Marra language called My Grandmother’s Lingo.

[h/t TIME]

Peter Dinklage Just Hinted That Tyrion Will Die in Game of Thrones

HBO
HBO

​If there's one thing HBO's Game of Thrones has done in the seven seasons it's been on the air, it's ​completely disrupt fan expectations. Tropes that worked in the original books, like killing off major characters almost randomly, were assumed not to translate well to television until the first season of the show killed off presumed series protagonist Ned Stark.

And now star Peter Dinklage has horrified fans by just suggesting that his character, ​Tyrion Lannister, might not make it out of the upcoming eighth and final season of the show alive. In an interview with ​Vulture, Dinklage stated, "I think [Tyrion] was given a very good conclusion. No matter what that is. Death can be a great way out."

Though he could be indulging in the traditional Game of Thrones style of answering interview questions, a.k.a. keep everything vague and leave as many possible interpretations as possible, it's completely within the realm of possibility that ​Tyrion will leave the show at the end of a blade. If that's the case, many fans agree it will no doubt be held by his sister and apparent rival, Cersei, who currently sits on the Iron Throne.

Cersei has always been cautions and resentful of Tyrion due to a prophecy that stated she would die by the hand of a "little brother," whom she believes to be her dwarf younger sibling. A prominent fan theory states that Cersei will kill Tyrion, which will in turn give their brother and Cersei's twin Jaime the motivation to overcome his love of Cersei and slay her.

Dinklage, for his part, doesn't seem too torn up about the prospect of Tyrion dying, saying he felt the character had a good trajectory over the seasons. "He used his position as the outcast of his family like an adolescent would," the actor shared. "The beauty of Tyrion is that he grew out of that mode in a couple of seasons and developed a strong sense of responsibility."

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER