What America's Average Take-Home Pay Looks Like Compared to Other Countries

iStock
iStock

When you look at how much money people make around the world, salaries can only show part of the picture. In practically every country, workers give up a chunk of their paycheck to the government. So after taxes, which citizens get to hold onto the biggest slice of their pie? These graphics from the company relocation program CapRelo lay it out, analyzing what people making the average wage in a number of countries can expect to pay in taxes each year.

A map of the percentage of the average wage in each country that goes toward taxes
CapRelo

The countries with the highest tax rates in the world can all be found in Europe. In Belgium, workers give up 45 percent of the average wage, while in Sweden, they pay 52 percent, and in Denmark, they pay 56 percent. But not every nation on the continent follows this trend. In Switzerland, employees making the average wage pay just 2 percent in taxes, one of the lowest rates in the world. The only citizens that pay less are in India and Saudi Arabia, where the tax rates are 0 percent.

Lower taxes don't necessarily equal bigger paychecks. Though Denmark pays the most taxes, the average take-home salary ($28,227) is still higher than it is in Saudi Arabia ($21,720) and India ($1,670). But workers in Switzerland enjoy the biggest wages after taxes by far, with an average take-home salary of $84,006. The runner-up is the U.S., with an average take-home salary of $52,344.

A graph showing average salaries versus take-home pay
CapRelo

Of course, these figures don't take the cost of living into account. Citizens paying less in taxes are often forced to spend that money on benefits they would receive from the government in other countries. In Switzerland, for example, you have to pay to drive on motorways, while in the U.S., most highways are maintained using government funds. Meanwhile, the U.S. is one of the few developed nations that doesn't offer universal healthcare. And while Swedes may pay a lot in taxes, thanks to generous government subsidies, they also pay some of the world's lowest rates for childcare. So make sure you consider all the factors before picking a new place to live based on tax rate.

[h/t CapRelo]

This Service Will Deal With the Logistical Side of Your Breakup for $99

iStock.com/LightFieldStudios
iStock.com/LightFieldStudios

In the aftermath of a breakup, it can be hard to do anything but watch sad movies and eat ice cream in bed. But your broken heart isn't the only thing that needs attention when a relationship ends: If you shared a living space with your ex, you'll also have to deal with finding a different place to live, moving out, and furnishing your new space. Fortunately, the newly single don't have to navigate this process alone. As Fast Company reports, Onward is a new concierge service based in New York City that handles the practical aspects of a breakup so you can focus on recovery.

Onward wants clients to see breaking up as an opportunity to start a new phase of life, and to get you started on that path, they begin by finding you a new, temporary place to live. The service has connections with furnished, short-term rental options in the city that are ready for new tenants. The utilities and paperwork have already been figured out for you, so all you need to worry about is moving in. Onward will send over packers and movers to help you move out of your old place and move on with your life as quickly as possible.

If you're having trouble processing your emotions after a breakup, Onward offers support in that area as well. Instead of weeding through tons of therapists on your own, the service narrows down your options to one to three vetted mental health professionals within your insurance network in just 24 hours. A 10-day package from Onward, which includes housing placement, packing, moving, and mental healthcare search assistance, starts at $99.

Onward's services couldn't come at a better time—the number of U.S. adults in cohabiting relationships rose from 14 million to 18 million between 2007 and 2016. That means many couples who break up have to deal with the same complications of divorce without the legal guidance. And finding a new place to live can be expensive, which keeps many people from moving on: According to one survey, 28 percent of people cite financial security as a reason for staying with their current partner.

Services like Onward can not only help the recently dumped, but also those who have been putting off pulling the plug on an unsatisfying relationship. You can sign up for their service after answering a few questions on their website.

[h/t Fast Company]

Here's How Much Money You Need to Retire Early in Each State

iStock.com/katso80
iStock.com/katso80

If you're complacent with your career, your goals might be limited to grabbing the last office doughnut. But if you have an eye on retirement, you might be wondering how much it's going to take to walk away from the desk forever.

Cost information website How Much has compiled estimates of the savings residents of each state might need in order to retire early at the ages of 35, 45, and 55. The site used figures from GoBankingRates that looked at the cost of living in the various regions and then estimated annual expenses based on age with an average 4 percent withdrawal rate annually.

If you wanted to retire at age 35 in Ohio, for example, having $1.61 million in your savings account would be ideal. In California, you’d need $2.37 million.

An infographic shows how much money is needed to retire at age 35 in each state
howmuch

An infographic shows how much money is needed to retire by age 45 in each state
howmuch

An infographic shows how much money is needed to retire by age 55 in each state
howmuch

The site cautions that this is an oversimplification of what should be some highly individualized financial planning. Everyone has different needs, and the numbers don't account for inflation or for adjusting the 4 percent annual withdrawal. In short, this is nothing you should pass along to your accountant. What these charts can do, however, is spark motivation to make your own plans for having a comfortable retirement. If you want to spend it in Hawaii, it might be best to start saving now.

[h/t Thrillist]

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