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Mason Parker
Mason Parker

11 Absolutely Eye-catching Chandeliers

Mason Parker
Mason Parker

My 108-year-old house has the original ceiling lights, although they were wired for electricity sometime in the 1930s (they were originally gas lamps). They need to be replaced, but I'm having a hard time finding anything charming enough to take their place -at least that's appropriate and in my price range. If I weren't so budget-conscious and picky, I'd have a world of creative lighting options. Let's take a look at what's out there in chandeliers.

1. Globes

Lighting sculptor Benoit Vieubled calls this work Monde à l’endroit, Monde à l’envers. That loosely translates to "World Right Side Up, World Upside Down." The chandelier is made of 15 world globes of various colors. It certainly is pretty, and these illuminated globes make one realize what can be done with beautiful objects that take up too much room sitting on a shelf or table: Hang them from the ceiling!

2. Drums

This light fixture made of drums was built by Matt Ludwig for the restaurant JJ's Red Hots. The name of the former restaurant at the location was The Drum, so the chandelier was conceived to honor the building's heritage. You can see pictures of the building process at the restaurant's blog

3. Bicycle Chains

Artist Carolina Fontoura Alzaga loves to take castoff materials and make something beautiful. Her Connect series is a line of chandeliers made from old bicycle chains, which resemble chain mail and diffuse the light in a variety of ways. No two chandeliers are exactly alike! You can see some that are available for sale at Etsy. Watch a video of Facaro at work making them. 

4. Champagne Corks

The Celebration Chandelier by Alkesh Parmar is made of corks reclaimed from champagne bars. The corks were hollowed out and fitted with LEDs to make a custom fixture for use in bars, restaurants, or even homes. The look is both antique and modern.

5. Beer Bottles

Now here's a chandelier that tells the world something about you -your favorite beer(s)! No, they aren't commissioned. The company Barlite sells rack lights of different sizes and configurations into which you insert your own empty bottles. You can say each chandelier is custom-made, and they can be changed as your tastes and inventory changes. Just be sure that the bottles are completely dry before you hang them upside down!

6. Teacups

This is a lovely way to make use of fine china teacups that don't match the rest of your set, while keeping them out of harm's way. This chandelier would be perfect in a large casual dining room or a restaurant. We don't know who built it, but it was spotted in the clothing store Nice Things in Valencia, Spain, by blogger Chris of La Petite Nymphéa

7. Books

Lucy Norman created the chandelier called Light Reading from discarded books! The large circles are made from folding each page of a book. This is actually a lampshade that can be used to cover existing light fixtures -perfect for a library or reading room.

8. Glass Art

While many themed chandeliers are made from found objects or recycled materials, there are many lighting artists who create original designs from conventional materials. Glass artist Robert Kaindl fashions his chandeliers in glass for large rooms and public places. In all colors.

9. Stained Glass Octopus

This awesome stained glass octopus chandelier was made by Mason Parker of Mason’s Creations. Each of the tentacles is detachable, and the entire octopus is four feet across. You can adjust the lighting by illuminating just the center, just the tentacles, or all of it together. The octopus is a one-of-a-kind handmade work of art, but it's been sold. Parker says he will make another, but considering the craft involved, that may take some time! See more pictures at Mason's Creations.

10. Nintendo Zappers

Our own Erin McCarthy told us about a one-of-a-kind chandelier made from Nintendo zappers, the accessory used in the game Duck Hunt. Who would have this many gaming guns? JJGames, which is where the light fixture hangs.

11. Gummi Bear Candelier

This chandelier called the Candelier is made from approximately 15,000 Gummi bears! No, they won't go stale or melt, because they are tough yet realistic acrylic Gummi bears, strung together by hand. The sweet treat is available from Jellio. Watch the process of making one in this video. It's also available in a smaller size called the Mini Candelier, with 3,000 bears.

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Art
Art Lovers in England, Rejoice: France's Famous Bayeux Tapestry is Coming to the UK
Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

One of France’s most prized national treasures, the Bayeux Tapestry, is officially heading to England for exhibition. The loan will mark the first time the fragile 11th century work has left France in nearly 1000 years, according to The Washington Post.

French president Emmanuel Macron announced news of the loan in mid-January, viewed by some as a gesture to smooth post-Brexit relations with Britain, ABC reports. The tapestry depicts the Norman Conquest of England in 1066, a historically important event replete with guts and glory.

Stretching for 210 feet, the Bayeux Tapestry’s nine embroidered panels tell the tale of Harold, Earl of Wessex, who swore an oath to support the right of William, Duke of Normandy, to the English throne once King Edward (a.k.a. Edward the Confessor) died without an heir. But after Edward's funeral at Westminster Abbey, Harold breaks his oath to William so he could be crowned king instead. Believing he was the rightful ruler, William—today remembered as William the Conqueror—decides to wage war and ultimately defeats Harold at the Battle of Hastings.

The historical narrative has endured for centuries, but the tapestry's provenance has been lost to time. Experts think that the artwork may have been created in England, shortly after the Battle of Hastings, although it’s unclear who designed and embroidered the scenes. Its original owner, Bishop Odo of Bayeux, the half-brother of William the Conqueror, may have commissioned the Bayeux Tapestry. He became Earl of Kent after the Battle of Hastings, and this new title would have afforded him access to skilled artisans, The Guardian explains.

The Bayeux Tapestry is currently on display in the town of Bayeux in Normandy. It likely won’t leave France until 2020, after conservators ensure that it’s safe to move the artwork. According to The Telegraph, the tapestry might be be displayed at the British Museum in 2022.

[h/t The Washington Post]

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Photo composite, Mental Floss. Car, ticket, Simon Laprise. Background, iStock.
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Design
This Snow Sculpture of a Car Was So Convincing Cops Tried to Write It a Ticket
Photo composite, Mental Floss. Car, ticket, Simon Laprise. Background, iStock.
Photo composite, Mental Floss. Car, ticket, Simon Laprise. Background, iStock.

Winter is a frustrating time to be on the road, but one artist in Montreal has found a way to make the best of it. As CBS affiliate WGCL-TV reports, his snow sculpture of a DeLorean DMC-12 was so convincing that even the police were fooled.

Simon Laprise of L.S.D Laprise Simon Designs assembled the prank car using snow outside his home in Montreal. He positioned it so it appeared to be parked along the side of the road, and with the weather Montreal has been having lately, a car buried under snow wasn’t an unusual sight.

A police officer spotted the car and was prepared to write it a ticket before noticing it wasn’t what it seemed. He called in backup to confirm that the car wasn’t a car at all.

Instead of getting mad, the officers shared a good laugh over it. “You made our night hahahahaha :)" they wrote on a fake ticket left on the snow sculpture.

The masterpiece was plowed over the next morning, but you can appreciate Laprise’s handiwork in the photos below.

Snow sculpture.

Snow sculpture of car.

Snow sculpture of car.

Note written in French.

[h/t WGCL-TV]

All images courtesy of Simon Laprise.

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