This Working Pinball Machine Is Made Entirely of LEGO Bricks

Bre Burns, The Brothers Brick
Bre Burns, The Brothers Brick

LEGO sets are fun when you're piecing them together, and significantly less fun when they're fully assembled and gathering dust in your closet. That's not the case with the latest masterwork from builder Bre Burns. Her functioning LEGO pinball machine provides hours of entertainment even after the last brick has been laid.

According to the LEGO fan site The Brothers Brick, Burns built the initial model of the machine for the BrickCon LEGO exhibition in October 2017 and debuted an improved version at the Emerald City Comic Con in Seattle in March. The 2.5-foot-tall machine consists of 15,000 blocks put together over the course of 200 to 300 hours. Even the castor steel balls, lights, motors, and sensors are official products from LEGO Mindstorms and Technic—collections originally designed for building and programming robots.

Burns dubbed her creation "Benny's Space Adventure" after the excitable classic blue spaceman minifigure from The Lego Movie (2014). The final design includes sound effects, a coin slot, a gumball dispenser, a mosaic of Benny, and a moving spaceship mounted on top of the machine.

Master builders have been using LEGO bricks for years to make items that work in the real world. In 2015, Italian carpenter Nicola Pavan used LEGO to build a fully functional guitar, and that same year a team of professional builders broke a world record with its 215,158-brick camper.

[h/t The Brothers Brick]

Chucky Got a Makeover, and the Original Child's Play Creator Isn't Happy About It

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc.
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc.

In early July, horror movie fans got word that a reboot of Child’s Play was in the works at MGM with Polaroid director Lars Klevberg and It producers David Katzenberg and Seth Grahame-Smith. While the team has been pretty quiet about what to expect from new film (production is only just now getting off the ground in Vancouver), the biggest question on fans’ minds is: What will Chucky look like? They got their answer late last week when Entertainment Weekly shared a sneak peek photo from the film.

While the photo only showed half of Chucky’s face (the other half was obscured by the knife the homicidal doll was holding), it was clear that this isn’t the same Good Guy doll so many fans have come to know and love (and fear). Klevberg told EW that they’ll be using both practical and digital effects to render Chucky 2.0 and that, “Our Chucky will be our Chucky and he will be presented when the movie comes out.”

One person who wasn’t thrilled with this news? Filmmaker Don Mancini, who turned what was supposed to be a congenial ginger doll into a murderous maniac with the release of the original Child’s Play in 1988. In the 30 years since, Chucky has become a major horror icon, thanks in large part to the full-blown horror franchise that Mancini inadvertently created—not to mention Brad Dourif, who has voiced Chucky in all seven films.

In July, Mancini told EW that he was offered the opportunity to get an executive producer credit on the reboot, but declined as he was concerned that the new film might “muddy” the brand. The sneak peek photo doesn’t seem to have eased his mind.

Shortly after EW’s image dropped, Mancini took to Twitter to give his take on the Chuckster’s new look:

Friends ‘til the end … or until a digital makeover.

The Most Popular Halloween Candy in Each State

If you've ever argued that no one actually likes candy corn, you're probably not from Alabama, Iowa, Idaho, Michigan, New Mexico, Nevada, or Rhode Island. The controversial confection is a favorite treat among residents in those states, according to sales data from online candy retailer CandyStore.com.

As they've done for more than a decade, the bulk candy retailer combed through 11 years of data (with a particular focus on the months leading up to All Hallows' Eve) to gauge America’s top-selling sweets. They created the interactive map below to display their results.

Source: CandyStore.com.

In addition to the divisive—yet classic—candy corn, Skittles, M&Ms, Snickers, Reese's Peanut Butter Cups, and Starburst were among the nation's favorite candies. Hot Tamales, Tootsie Pops, Jolly Ranchers, and Sour Patch Kids have all earned some candy lovers' devotion, too.

Some states are unique in their top candy choices: Mississippi was the only state to name 3 Musketeers the best, while Connecticut opted for Almond Joy and West Virginia showed their love of Blow Pops. Meanwhile, trick-or-treaters in Kentucky have a sweet tooth for Swedish Fish, Louisianans love Lemonheads, and Delawareans would die for Life Savers.

After seeing which treat is number one in your state, check out the chart below to learn how many pounds of each top-ranking candy are consumed in each state (and then go buy a new toothbrush).

Source: CandyStore.com

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