The Right Way to Hold Your Cat, According to a Vet

iStock
iStock

Every cat parent has experienced the soul-crushing rejection of picking up their kitty for some cuddles, only for Fluffy to fight for freedom, occasionally leaving behind a nasty trail of scratches. The good news is that your cat probably doesn't hate you—you might just be holding him wrong.

There are a few ways to avoid having to break out the first aid kit, all while making your cat feel more comfortable and secure. In a video spotted by IFL Science, veterinarian Uri Burstyn of the Helpful Vancouver Vet YouTube page used cat models Claudia and Pirate to demonstrate some proper handling techniques.

There are a few different maneuvers you can use, depending on your cat’s personality and what you’re trying to accomplish—whether it be picking them up for some cuddles or holding them down to get them to swallow a pill. First, Dr. Burstyn advises pet owners to approach with caution, letting the cat sniff your fingers or giving her some gentle tickles under the chin.

If the cat seems receptive, you can now pick him or her up. Dr. Burstyn notes that “the key to picking up a cat safely is to make them feel supported.” Let’s say you want to remove your cat from the kitchen counter for the thousandth time: Place one hand under the cat’s chest, another under the abdomen, and lift gently. This prevents the cat from kicking its hind legs in an attempt to gain ground, which is one of the most common causes of scratches, Dr. Burstyn says.

Whether you’re holding a cat in your arms or trying to stop them from running away, the key is cat squishing. Yes, really. Gently press down on a cat that’s trying to wriggle its way out of your grasp. If you're holding the cat, pull it closer to your body.

“If we do have a cat who’s trying to get away from us, we always squish that cat,” Dr. Burstyn says. “You don’t have to worry about hurting a cat. They’re very tough little beasts and just squishing them against your body is never going to do them any harm. In fact, they tend to feel more safe and secure when they’re being held tightly.”

There’s another hold that Dr. Burstyn calls the “football carry,” which involves scooping up the cat so that its head is tucked between your arm and your torso. One hand supports its abdomen while another supports its bottom. This is best for emergency situations when you need to move your pet quickly.

And if you happen to have a “shoulder cat” like Pirate, they’ll do most of the work themselves by climbing onto your shoulder, but there’s still a proper holding technique. Support their butt with one hand, and when you’re ready to put them down, slowly lean forward while still supporting their bottom until they twist around and hop back on their feet.

Of course, some cats simply don't like to be held, so it's important to pay attention to their body language. A low tail and flattened ears are both signs that your feline probably wants to be left alone, according to Mother Nature Network.

For more on Dr. Burstyn's tips, check out the video below.

[h/t IFL Science]

A Dracula Ant's Jaws Snap at 200 Mph—Making It the Fastest Animal Appendage on the Planet

Ant Lab, YouTube
Ant Lab, YouTube

As if Florida’s “skull-collecting” ants weren’t terrifying enough, we’re now going to be having nightmares about Dracula ants. A new study in the journal Royal Society Open Science reveals that a species of Dracula ant (Mystrium camillae), which is found in Australia and Southeast Asia, can snap its jaws shut at speeds of 90 meters per second—or the rough equivalent of 200 mph. This makes their jaws the fastest part of any animal on the planet, researchers said in a statement.

These findings come from a team of three researchers that includes Adrian Smith, who has also studied the gruesome ways that the skull-collecting ants (Formica archboldi) dismember trap-jaw ants, which were previously considered to be the fastest ants on record. But with jaw speeds of just over 100 miles per hour, they’re no match for this Dracula ant. (Fun fact: The Dracula ant subfamily is named after their habit of drinking the blood of their young through a process called "nondestructive cannibalism." Yikes.)

Senior author Andrew Suarez, of the University of Illinois, said the anatomy of this Dracula ant’s jaw is unusual. Instead of closing their jaws from an open position, which is what trap-jaw ants do, they use a spring-loading technique. The ants “press the tips of their mandibles together to build potential energy that is released when one mandible slides across the other, similar to a human finger snap,” researchers write.

They use this maneuver to smack other arthropods or push them away. Once they’re stunned, they can be dragged back to the Dracula ant’s nest, where the unlucky victims will be fed to Dracula ant larvae, Suarez said.

Researchers used X-ray imaging to observe the ants’ anatomy in three dimensions. High-speed cameras were also used to record their jaws snapping at remarkable speeds, which measure 5000 times faster than the blink of a human eye. Check out the ants in slow-motion in the video below.

Plano, Texas Is Now Home to a Dog-Friendly Movie Theater

K9 Cinemas
K9 Cinemas

For dog owners in Plano, Texas, movie night with Fido no longer just means cuddling on the couch and browsing Netflix. The newly opened K9 Cinemas invites moviegoers—both human and canine—to watch classic films on the big screen.

The theater operates as a pop-up (or perhaps pup-up?) in a private event space near Custer Road and 15th Street in Plano. On the weekends, patrons can pay $5 for dogs, $9 for kids, and $12.50 for adults to see popular movies in the 50-seat space. Snacks—both the pet and people kind—are available for $2 apiece. Dogs are limited to two per person, and just 25 human seats are sold per showing to leave room for the furry guests.

Pet owners are asked follow a few rules in order to take advantage of what the theater has to offer. Dogs must be up-to-date on all their shots, and owners can submit veterinary records online or bring a hard copy to the theater to verify their pooch's health status. Once inside, owners are responsible for taking their dog out for potty breaks and cleaning up after any accidents that happen (thankfully the floors are concrete and easy to wipe down).

K9 Cinemas is currently showing Elf (2003) and Home Alone (1990) for the holiday season. Dog and movie enthusiasts can buy tickets online now, or wait until January when the theater upgrades from padded chairs to couches for optimized puppy snuggle time.

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