Watch a "Trained" Spider Named Kim Leap Six Times Its Body Length

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Jumping spiders are cold-blooded assassins, masters of disguise, and just maybe a little quicker on the uptake than we're really OK with. For a study published in the journal Scientific Reports, a team of researchers from the University of Manchester "trained" one special jumping spider named Kim to leap in their experiment, all with the goal of demystifying the mechanics behind jumping spiders' abilities.

Kim was one of four regal jumping spiders (Phiddipus regius) the researchers brought into the lab for a close examination of how their bodies move as they leap and land. A jumping spider can clear up to six times its body length, which ranges from 0.04 to 0.98 inches—about the equivalent of a three-story building, relative to the spider's body size. For comparison, the farthest a human can jump is roughly 1.5 body lengths.

The researchers created an experiment chamber with platforms at varying distances from one another, then tried to coax the spiders into it. Only Kim would even enter. The researchers moved Kim between the take-off and landing platforms until she "became familiar with the challenge," they write. No tasty bait or stimulation (like blowing air) was used to motivate her. Still, her eventual familiarity with the task potentially implies some sort of learning. So even though she wasn't following orders, she figured out how to navigate the experiment's challenges—an impressive achievement for a spider about the size of an aspirin.

Using ultra-high-speed and high-resolution cameras, the researchers then filmed Kim's jumps to study how the arachnid moved her body when navigating a short jump equal to two body lengths; a longer jump equal to six lengths; and jumps between platforms placed at different heights. They found that Kim cleared shorter distances quickly and at low angles, thus sharpening her accuracy and boosting her chances of catching any prey that might be waiting at her destination. For longer jumps, she was more conservative with her energy, but her accuracy suffered.

Jumping spiders are excellent hunters, thanks in part to their precision ambushing skills. They also boast super-powered senses that help them locate their next meal before making their attack. Fine hairs on their legs allow them to "hear" subtle vibrations, and their eight eyes are sharp enough to track laser pointer lights.

This family of spiders also uses a hydraulic pressure system to move their legs. It helps jumping spiders extend their limbs, and some researchers have theorized that it also allows them to jump such great distances. According to the new study, that's not the case: "Our results suggest that whilst Kim can move her legs hydraulically, she does not need the additional power from hydraulics to achieve her extraordinary jumping performance," study co-author Bill Crowther said in a press statement. That means the jumps in the video below are made possible by Kim's muscle power alone.

What Caused Pangea to Break Apart?

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Emily Devenport:

There's another way to look at this question. People tend to think in terms of supercontinents forming and then breaking up again due to convection currents in the mantle, hot material rising and causing rifts in weaker spots, possibly in old sutures where the continents were shoved together—but what is really happening is that ocean basins are opening and closing, and the ocean has an active role in subduction.

The opening and closing of an ocean basin is called a Wilson Cycle. It begins when hot material rising from the mantle stretches the overlying crust. As molten material rises, a rift is formed. The rift is widened as material continues to squeeze into it. If that rifting goes on long enough, through a broad enough swath of a continent, ocean water will eventually flow into it, and an ocean basin begins to form. The upwelling of hot material will continue to rise through that thinner area of crust, pushing the plates apart. The Atlantic Ocean is an example of a basin that is well along in the Wilson Cycle; eventually subduction is going to begin at its margins, and the whole shebang will pivot.

This will happen because at the edge of continents, sediments accumulate. The weight of those sediments, combined with the weight of the water, drives the heavier, denser edge of the oceanic plate under the continental crust, which is fatter and lighter. Eventually subduction begins, and the basin begins to close again. The Pacific Ocean is an example of a basin that's closing.

If you look at a map of the oceanic rift zones, you'll notice that the one in the Atlantic is pretty much in the middle of that ocean, but the Pacific rift zone has been pulled all the way over to North America above Central America. Subduction is actively occurring on all margins of that plate.

The simple picture is that the continents are moving toward each other across the Pacific Ocean while the Atlantic Basin continues to widen. The truth is more complicated. When plates subduct, the water in the crust lowers the melting point of those rocks, so partial melting occurs. The partially melted material begins to rise through the overlying rocks, because it's less dense, and decompression melting occurs. Eventually, the upwelling of hot material forms plutons and volcanoes above the subduction zones. Fore-arc and Back-arc [PDF] basins can form. As the oceanic crust is pulled under the continental plate, island chains and other chunky bits get sutured to the edge of the continent along with sediments, making it larger. Our world is ~4.6 billion years old, so our continents are really large, now. They're unlikely to rift through the ancient cratons that formed their hearts.

What will happen if subduction begins on the eastern side of North America before the Pacific Basin closes? The margin next to California is a transform fault; it's not subducting. Will it eventually push itself under that part of North America again, or will the transform zone get bigger? The hot spot that was driving the ancient Farallon Plate under North America was eventually overridden by the southwestern states (Arizona, New Mexico, etc.) forming a rift zone. Will it continue to rift or poop out?

There are computer models predicting what supercontinent may form next. They will continue to change as our understanding of tectonic processes gets more accurate.

This post originally appeared on Quora. Click here to view.

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