Big Problem in the Big Easy: Invasive Cuban Treefrogs Move into Louisiana

iStock
iStock

Louisiana is now home to one more frog species, and that's a problem. According to Popular Science, scientists have found invasive Cuban treefrogs at a New Orleans zoo, marking the first toehold the amphibians have been able to make in the U.S. outside of Florida.

Cuban treefrogs are native to Cuba, the Cayman Islands, and the Bahamas, but they came to the U.S. in the 1920s by way of the Florida Keys. They have since spread as far north as Jacksonville. The massive frogs—females can grow up to 6 inches long—are major pests, hunting several species of native Floridian frogs and out-competing others, clogging drains and setting up camp in toilets, and occasionally causing power outages when they decide to hide in utility boxes.

Now, the species is showing up in New Orleans, more than 430 miles away. They may have stowed away on a 2016 shipment of palm trees from Lake Placid, Florida bound for the elephant exhibit at New Orleans's Audubon Zoo.

A U.S. Geological Survey in the fall of 2017 captured hundreds of the frogs on and around the zoo's grounds. Over the course of four surveys, USGS scientists found 367 frogs and 2000 Cuban treefrog tadpoles. They drained the two pools where the tadpoles were swimming in the hopes of killing off any they missed, but the likelihood of reversing the spread of the frogs is low. The USGS warned in a recent press statement that "eradicating the recently discovered population in Louisiana is improbable." The frogs reproduce quickly and will eat almost anything. Based on the results of these surveys, it seems they have already driven out all the native frogs in Riverview, the section of Audubon Park where the tadpoles were found.

Brad Glorioso, the lead USGS ecologist on the study, explained that while stowaway treefrogs have trouble surviving when they make their way to higher latitudes, the climate around New Orleans seems to be more hospitable to them. "They often end up in places with unsuitable climates, but in south Louisiana, Cuban treefrogs appear capable of withstanding seasonal cold spells by seeking appropriate refuge," he said.

For now, the best scientists can hope for is keeping the frogs from moving across the river from the zoo into one of the large public nature preserves nearby.

[h/t Popular Science]

2624-Year-Old Cypress Tree Discovered in North Carolina Swamp

iStock/earleliason
iStock/earleliason

National Love a Tree Day on May 16 is a day to appreciate all the world's trees, but a bald cypress recently identified in North Carolina is especially deserving of recognition. As Live Science reports, scientists date the tree to 2624 years old, making it one the oldest living non-clonal trees on Earth.

For their study, recently published in the journal Environmental Research Communications, a team of researchers studied the rings of trees in North Carolina's Black River swampland to learn more about climate history in the eastern United States. Bald cypresses are known to have impressive lifespans, but after analyzing specimens in the Black River's Three Sisters Swamp, an area that's notable for its long-lived trees, the scientists discovered that cypresses can grow to be even older than previously believed. The 2624-year-old cypress tree they found predates the Great Wall of China and the Roman Empire. Other remarkably old trees, including a 2088-year-old cypress, were also identified in the same grove.

The North Carolina cypresses are old, but there are other types of trees that can grow to be much older. Clonal tress are genetically identical plants that reproduce asexually from a single ancestor. Old Tjikko, a clonal tree in Sweden, has a root system that dates back 9550 years.

Despite all that North Carolina's bald cypress trees have endured, their lives are under threat. The swamp where the 2624-year-old tree stands is located just 6.5 feet above sea level, which means that floods driven by climate change could damage its habitat. And though the grove is in a protected area, industrial runoff and logging that's happening nearby could impact the trees' health. North Carolina is considering establishing a Black River State Park where the trees grow to further protect the ancient natural wonders.

[h/t Live Science]

This Beverage Maker Lets You Enjoy Carbonated Drinks Without Hurting the Environment

Sparkel
Sparkel

Whether you're preparing breakfast before you head off to work or looking for something to wash down lunch, procuring the perfect beverage is vital. If it's a carbonated drink, though, with that comes the carbon dioxide emissions that arise every time you hear that classic "fssst" sound from cracking one open. These emissions are actually quite harmful to the environment.

But thanks to the newly unveiled Spärkel, curating carbonated drinks can be done without using CO2 or any artificial ingredients.

"If you walk into any grocery store, the explosion in the popularity of sparkling drinks is plain to see with more choices and flavors than ever before, but why buy off-the-shelf when it is healthier, cheaper, and more fun to create your own drinks at home?" Darren Hatherell, CEO of Spärkel, said in a press release. "With Spärkel, we created a system that lets people use the freshest ingredients and convenient carbonation process to experiment and unleash their creativity in a way that is kind to their wallet and the environment."

Users can place any kind of ingredients they wish—berries, citrus, cucumbers, etc.—along with their drink of choice—water, tea, cocktails—into the 25 oz. (750 mL) bottle and choose what level, from one to five, of fizz they'd like to have added to their drink. The sealed chamber generates CO2 naturally from a sachet of Spärkel Carbonator powder, which is "made of a special granulation of citric acid and sodium bicarbonate." The CO2 bubbles are cycled through the liquid, and within a couple of minutes, you have a completely personalized sparkling drink.

On top of all that, the beverage maker is suitable for any number of usages from water and juices to cocktails. It also comes in nine different colors—black, white, gray, yellow, orange, red, blue, green, and pink—so it can match up with whatever kitchen palette you have.

To get your hands on the Spärkel, check it out on Indiegogo, where it's available for a pre-sale price of $59.

Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers and may receive a small percentage of any sale. But we choose all products independently and only get commission on items you buy and don’t return, so we’re only happy if you’re happy. Thanks for helping us pay the bills!

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER