10 Surprising Facts About Highlights Magazine

44 Pages
44 Pages

The inside-look-at-a-venerable-publication is a burgeoning documentary subgenre thanks to hits like The September Issue (2009) and Page One: Inside the New York Times (2011). Even still, there’s a certain cognitive dissonance in hearing that there’s a new film documenting the long-running kids' magazine Highlights for Children. After all, how much drama could there be in a colorful, inoffensive mag best known for its hidden picture puzzles, lesson-based comics like Goofus and Gallant and The Timbertoes, and its permanent residency in dentists' offices across America? A great deal, it turns out.

Director Tony Shaff’s 44 Pagescurrently playing at New York City’s IFC Center, streaming on select networks, and playing on demand—is a 90-minute fly-on-the-wall account of the Highlights staff putting together their June 2016 issue, which marked the magazine’s 70th anniversary. It’s pretty standard stuff: how stories get picked, finding illustrators, staring down deadlines. Full disclosure: I have worked in editorial roles at Scholastic News, Sports Illustrated Kids, and Time for Kids. There are certainly huge differences between those publications and Highlights, but the way the documentary conveys the experience of working for an outlet like this one—and the responsibilities that come with it—is accurate and honest and an important addition to the inside-media documentary canon.

But where the film soars is in its exploration of the magazine’s history and perpetual resonance. Founded in 1946 by husband-and-wife team Dr. Garry Cleveland and Caroline Myers, Highlights and its “Fun with a Purpose” tagline were created to give children a magazine full of encouragement and guidance.

Originally intended for kids ages two to 12, it currently serves those ages six to 12 and grapples with the issues young people face every day—not only traditional ones, such as best friend conflicts, but new challenges like digital overload. The magazine is a constant, steadying influence in the lives of children, and it holds an outsized place in their lives. The scenes in the film of kids meeting editors or touring Highlights’s offices in Honesdale, Pennsylvania—and of adults engaging with the magazine years after they first read it—are touching and reaffirming.

The film is also chockablock with insight, trivia, and, at times, tragedy about what made—and makes—Highlights a force in the lives of kids, and culture generally, around the world. Here are 10 of our favorites.

1. MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS RESUSCITATED HIGHLIGHTS.

A work-in-progress issue of Highlights Magazine is circulated for notes at the Highlights editorial offices in Honesdale, PA. (2016)
44 Pages

It’s a pop culture joke at this point how ubiquitous Highlights is in doctor and dentist offices. (Everyone from The Simpsons to Parks & Recreation has riffed on it.) But without the medical community, there would absolutely not be a Highlights today. About four years into the magazine's launch, the Myers were out of money. Their son, Garry Jr.—then a 28-year-old aeronautical engineer—took a six-month leave from his job to help his parents wind the business down.

“Instead, when he got there and he started looking into it, he decided that he could make it go,” Garry Jr.'s daughter Pat Mikelson, who is now Highlights’s historian and archivist, said in the documentary. “My dad rolled out this program to put Highlights into doctors' and dentists' offices and that really is what made Highlights take off and sustain us so we could earn enough money that we could definitely grow and continue.”

2. THE MAGAZINE—AND THE FAMILY RUNNING IT—WERE ROCKED BY UNIMAGINABLE DISASTER.

Ten years after Garry Jr. saved Highlights, the company had reached 500,000 subscribers and he was thinking of expanding its reach. On December 16, 1960, Myers, his wife Mary, and vice president Cyril Ewart boarded a plane in Columbus, Ohio, bound for New York for a meeting about getting the magazine on newsstands. “They went into New York in a snowstorm,” Mikelson recalled. “And there was a mid-air collision between two planes. One of the planes landed on a street in Brooklyn ... Everyone on those airplanes lost their lives.”

The crash between the United Airlines DC-8 and a TWA Super Constellation is one of the most notorious and tragic aviation disasters in American history. Mikelson and her four siblings went to live with an uncle in Texas while her grandparents—who by this time were in their 70s—stepped in to help guide the magazine. “Highlights survived," Mikelson said. "My grandparents just decided they were going to go forward. As a family, it was very difficult, and it was for many years. But we all made it through.”

Today, the company is still a family business: CEO Kent S. Johnson is the great-grandson of Garry C. and Carolyn Myers.

3. EARLY ISSUES DREW CONTENT FROM A HOLY SOURCE. SEVERAL OF THEM, ACTUALLY.

Highlights has a long tradition of helping kids point their moral compass in the direction of goodness (see: Goofus and Gallant). And in the early days, that mission included publishing passages from the Bible. But the goal was never to push one ideology: Bible stories ran alongside pieces on other world religions, such as Islam, Judaism, and Buddhism. “I was actually very shocked," art director Patrick Greenish Jr. admitted. "For some odd reason, I always thought Highlights was a Christian brand. And they're not. Having good morals doesn't mean you have to be Christian. It's just knowing right from wrong. It's essentially what it boils down to.”

4. IT HAS FEATURED SOME MAJOR CONTRIBUTORS.

Dave Justice, Senior Production Artist prepares an issue for review at the Highlights editorial offices in Honesdale, PA in 2016.
Senior production artist Dave Justice prepares an issue for review at the Highlights editorial offices in Honesdale, Pennyslvania.
44 Pages

If a magazine is as old as Highlights, chances are good that some pretty big names will have passed through its pages. To wit: Highlights has published poems from Lewis Carroll, Carl Sandburg, Ogden Nash, Emily Dickinson, Langston Hughes, and Rita Dove. At one point in 44 Pages, we see a layout with a story bylined Robert Louis Stevenson. And later, editor-in-chief Christine French Cully shares with editor Judy Burke a gem she unearthed from the archives: a letter from Highlights editor Walter B. Barre, dated February 6, 1968, buying a piece from Walter Cronkite titled "Political Conventions." "We are happy to purchase all rights including copyright to this manuscript for the sum of $200,” Barre wrote. (It’s unclear whether the piece ever ran.)

5. YOU WON'T FIND ANY STORIES ABOUT WITCHES IN HIGHLIGHTS'S PAGES.

One of the realities of working for a children's publication is that you inevitably steer clear of some topics, or at least give them more thought than you would at a general audience publication. One potential minefield is holidays: You don’t want to alienate anyone or make them feel like their celebration is less important than another. So it makes sense when Highlights senior editor Joëlle Dujardin explained that the magazine does not publish fiction pieces about Santa Claus. Stories about witches are another no-go zone, which also tracks; there are a lot of people who don’t want their kids exposed to the supernatural, but that’s not why Highlights avoids them.

“We don't cover [witches] to respect the Wiccan community's feelings about witches and the portrayal of them as being dark and scary, whereas a lot of Wiccan people are not,” Dujardin says. “No witches, no Santa, no child trafficking.” (That last one seems obvious, but in the documentary we see Dujardin reading a kid-submitted a story about children being kidnapped.)

6. GOOFUS AND GALLANT USED TO BE MORE TOLKIEN THAN KIDS-NEXT-DOOR.

Goofus and Gallant is one of the perennial features of Highlights, a comic strip featuring two boys who represent very clear sides of a challenge. “Here's the bad choice, here's the good choice,” assistant editor Annie Beer Rodriguez explained. Added Mikelson: “Goofus is the bad and Gallant is the good, always.”

The characters first appeared in 1940 in Children’s Activities, the magazine Garry C. Myers worked on before creating Highlights with his wife. But their didactic adventures originally had a more fantastic bent: They first appeared as little elves, before becoming more recognizably human in 1950.

7. THE HIDDEN PICTURE PUZZLES COME WITH SPECIFIC RULES.

Hidden Pictures Illustrator Neil Numberman works at his studio in Brooklyn, NY (2016
Hidden Pictures illustrator Neil Numberman works at his studio in Brooklyn.
44 Pages

Illustrator Neil Numberman—a self-professed Brooklyn hipster artist—has contributed numerous pieces to Highlights, including Hidden Pictures, mazes, word searches, and crossword puzzles. As a result, he has gained some unique insights into what works—and what really, really doesn’t—when it comes to those venerable Hidden Picture puzzles.

Highlights took us out to a retreat, and it was literally a Hidden Pictures class,” Numberman said. “You can have more difficult ones and easier ones in an illustration. They actually prefer that so that the kid will find something easily and then start to get engaged with the piece. They want the hidden objects to stay away from the crotch. That's the funniest feedback. Sometimes I'll have a rooster and he'll have a tail and I'll say that could be a glove. But since the glove is coming out of the butt, you can't do that.”

8. EDITORS TAKE THEIR RESPONSIBILITY TO YOUNG READERS VERY SERIOUSLY.

“We get about 3,000 Dear Highlights letters a year,” Reader Mail coordinator Patty Courtright said. “We reply to every letter that we receive from a child. I believe that we're the only magazine who writes to a child every time one writes.” That dedication has made Highlights a vital outlet for children.

“We know that they're writing to us with a real issue that is very serious to them,” editorial assistant Allison Kane said. And sometimes, the issues are capital-S serious. “If it's a real touchy situation,” like running away, abuse, or divorce, “we put a red sticker on those and try to respond to those as soon as possible,” Courtright explained. “A little girl said she was being abused by her babysitter and she was told not to tell anybody and this child confided in us. She didn't know what to do. That was a case where we got the authorities involved and the mother was so thankful because she had no clue, of course, that this was going on.” The experience really shook Courtright, but “then I realized, thank god the child felt that she could write to us.”

9. HIGHLIGHTS MIGHT HAVE HELPED JAYCEE DUGARD AND HER KIDS.

"Dear Highlights" isn’t the only section of the magazine with the potential to impact kids’ lives in major ways. "Ask Arizona"—an advice column penned by the fictional character Arizona, who answers imaginary letters based on real kid submissions—is a relatively new creation. Author Lissa Rovetch has written more than 140 of them, and they can address big topics like transgender issues and scary environmental problems. “I know that it makes a difference for kids all over the world,” Rovetch explained. “Several years ago, a girl was kidnapped. For many years, she lived in somebody's backyard and he raped her and she had his two little girls. She was allowed very, very few things from the outside world, and one of the things was Highlights magazine. So the idea, for me, that my stories about how to be a kind, real, feeling, decent human being in the world and it's OK to be scared, it's OK to be nervous, it's OK to be angry, these little girls got that was incredibly moving to me."

10. IF YOU'VE EVER SENT A LETTER OR ARTWORK TO HIGHLIGHTS, YOU’RE IN THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES.

Annie Beer Rodriguez, Assistant Editor shows off a child’s submission to Highlights Magazine at the editorial offices in Honesdale, PA (2015)
Highlights assistant editor Annie Beer Rodriguez shows off a child’s submission to the magazine.
44 Pages

If you read Highlights as a kid, you probably submitted a poem or story or letter or drawing, hoping to one day see your name or work in your favorite magazine. (Submissions are still rolling in: Dujardin says they get 300 fiction pieces a month.) Even if you got a reply from an editor, odds are you didn’t get published in Highlights. But here’s some long-game validation: Highlights saved everything—everything—and, about a decade ago, donated its archive, spanning the years 1946 to 2007, to Ohio State University.

“We received about 300 different pallets from the Highlights company,” Deidra Herring, Ohio State's education librarian and associate professor, said. “Every single letter that a child ever wrote, we have acquired.” They also got any kid-submitted art and company philosophy documents. The archive is a boon to researchers, especially of childhood development, which is a pretty good second life for all that adolescent creative energy and angst.

16 Biting Facts About Fright Night

William Ragsdale stars in Fright Night (1985).
William Ragsdale stars in Fright Night (1985).
Columbia Pictures

Charley Brewster is your typical teen: he’s got a doting mom, a girlfriend whom he loves, a wacky best friend … and an enigmatic vampire living next door.

For more than 30 years, Tom Holland’s critically acclaimed directorial debut has been a staple of Halloween movie marathons everywhere. To celebrate the season, we dug through the coffins of the horror classic in order to discover some things you might not have known about Fright Night.

1. Fright Night was based on "The Boy Who Cried Wolf."

Or, in this case, "The Boy Who Cried Vampire." “I started to kick around the idea about how hilarious it would be if a horror movie fan thought that a vampire was living next door to him,” Holland told TVStoreOnline of the film’s genesis. “I thought that would be an interesting take on the whole Boy Who Cried Wolf thing. It really tickled my funny bone. I thought it was a charming idea, but I really didn't have a story for it.”

2. Peter Vincent made Fright Night click.

It wasn’t until Holland conceived of the character of Peter Vincent, the late-night horror movie host played by Roddy McDowall, that he really found the story. While discussing the idea with a department head at Columbia Pictures, Holland realized what The Boy Who Cried Vampire would do: “Of course, he's gonna go to Vincent Price!” Which is when the screenplay clicked. “The minute I had Peter Vincent, I had the story,” Holland told Dread Central. “Charley Brewster was the engine, but Peter Vincent was the heart.”

3. Peter Vincent is named after two horror icons.

Peter Cushing and Vincent Price.

4. The Peter Vincent role was intended for Vincent Price.

Roddy McDowall in Fright Night (1985)
Roddy McDowall as Peter Vincent in Fright Night (1985).
Columbia Pictures

“Now the truth is that when I first went out with it, I was thinking of Vincent Price, but Vincent Price was not physically well at the time,” Holland said.

5. Roddy McDowall did not want to play the part like Vincent Price.

Once he was cast, Roddy McDowall made the decision that Peter Vincent was nothing like Vincent Price—specifically: he was a terrible actor. “My part is that of an old ham actor,” McDowall told Monster Land magazine in 1985. “I mean a dreadful actor. He had a moderate success in an isolated film here and there, but all very bad product. Basically, he played one character for eight or 10 films, for which he probably got paid next to nothing. Unlike stars of horror films who are very good actors and played lots of different roles, such as Peter Lorre and Vincent Price or Boris Karloff, this poor sonofabitch just played the same character all the time, which was awful.”

6. It took Holland just three weeks to write the Fright Night script.

And he had a helluva good time doing it, too. “I couldn’t stop writing,” Holland said in 2008, during a Fright Night reunion at Fright Fest. “I wrote it in about three weeks. And I was laughing the entire time, literally on the floor, kicking my feet in the air in hysterics. Because there’s something so intrinsically humorous in the basic concept. So it was always, along with the thrills and chills, something there that tickled your funny bone. It wasn’t broad comedy, but it’s a grin all the way through.”

7. Tom Holland directed Fright Night out of "self-defense."

By the time Fright Night came around, Holland was already a Hollywood veteran—just not as a director. He had spent the past two decades as an actor and writer and he told the crowd at Fright Fest that “this was the first film where I had sufficient credibility in Hollywood to be able to direct ... I had a film after Psycho 2 and before Fright Night called Scream For Help, which … I thought was so badly directed that [directing Fright Night] was self-defense. In self-defense, I wanted to protect the material, and that’s why I started directing with Fright Night."

8. Chris Sarandon had a number of reasons for not wanting to make Fright Night.

Chris Sarandon stars in 'Fright Night' (1985)
Chris Sarandon stars in Fright Night (1985).
Columbia Pictures

At the Fright Night reunion, Chris Sarandon recalled his initial reaction to being approached about playing vampire Jerry Dandrige. "I was living in New York and I got the script,” he explained. “My agent said that someone was interested in the possibility of my doing the movie, and I said to myself, ‘There’s no way I can do a horror movie. I can’t do a vampire movie. I can’t do a movie with a first-time director.’ Not a first-time screenwriter, but first-time director. And I sat down and read the script, and I remember very vividly sitting at my desk, looked over at my then wife and said, ‘This is amazing. I don’t know. I have to meet this guy.’ And so, I came out to L.A. And I met with Tom [Holland] and our producer. And we just hit it off, and that was it.”

9. Jerry Dandridge is part fruit bat.

After doing some research into the history of vampires and the legends surrounding them, Sarandon decided that Jerry had some fruit bat in him, which is why he’s often seen snacking on fruit in the film. When asked about the 2011 remake with Colin Farrell, Sarandon commented on how much he appreciated that that specific tradition continued. “In this one, it's an apple, but in the original, Jerry ate all kinds of fruit because it was just sort of something I discovered by searching it—that most bats are not blood-sucking, but they're fruit bats,” Sarandon told io9. “And I thought well maybe somewhere in Jerry's genealogy, there's fruit bat in him, so that's why I did it.”

10. William Ragsdale learned he had booked the part of Charley Brewster on Halloween.

William Ragsdale had only ever appeared in one film before Fright Night (in a bit part). He had recently been considered for the role of Rocky Dennis in Mask, which “didn’t work out,” Ragsdale recalled. “But a few months later, [casting director] Jackie Burch tells me, ‘There’s this movie I’m casting. You might be really right for it.’ So, I had this 1976 Toyota Celica and I drove that through the San Joaquin valley desert for four or five trips down for auditioning. And in the last one, Stephen [Geoffreys] was there, Amanda [Bearse] was there and that’s when it happened. I had read the script and at the time I had been doing Shakespeare and Greek drama, so I read this thing and thought, ‘Well, God, this looks like a lot of fun. There’s no … iambic pentameter, there’s no rhymes. You know? Where’s the catharsis? Where’s the tragedy?’ … I ended up getting a call on Halloween that they had decided to use me, and I was delighted.”

11. Not being Anthony Michael Hall worked in Stephen Geoffreys's favor.

In a weird way, it was by not being Anthony Michael Hall that Stephen Geoffreys was cast as Evil Ed. “I actually met Jackie Burch, the casting director, by mistake in New York months before this movie was cast and she remembered me,” Geoffreys shared at Fright Fest. “My agent sent me for an audition for Weird Science. And Anthony Michael Hall was with the same agent that I was with, and she sent me by mistake. And Jackie looked at me when I walked into the office and said, ‘You’re not Anthony Michael Hall!’ and I’m like ‘No!’ But anyway, I sat down and I talked to Jackie for a half hour and she remembered me from that interview and called my agent, and my agent sent me the script while I was with Amanda [Bearse] in Palm Springs doing Fraternity Vacation, and I read it. It was awesome. The writing was incredible.”

12. Evil Ed wanted to be Charley Brewster.

Stephen Geoffreys stars in 'Fright Night' (1985).
Stephen Geoffreys stars in Fright Night (1985).
Columbia Pictures

Geoffreys loved the script for Fright Night. “I just got this really awesome feeling about it,” he said. “I read it and thought I’ve got to do this. I called my agent and said ‘I would love to audition for the part of Charley Brewster!’ [And he said] ‘No, Steve, you’re wanted for the part of Evil Ed.’ And I went, ‘Are you kidding me? Why? I couldn’t… What do they see in me that they think I should be this?' Well anyway, it worked out. It was awesome and I had a great time.”

13. Fright Night's original ending was much different.

The film’s original ending saw Peter Vincent transform into a vampire—while hosting “Fright Night” in front of a live television audience.

14. A ghost from Ghostbusters made a cameo in Fright Night.

Visual effects producer Richard Edlund had recently finished up work on Ghostbusters when he and his team began work on Fright Night. And the movie gave them a great reason to recycle one of the library ghosts they had created for Ghostbusters—which was deemed too scary for Ivan Reitman's PG-rated classic—and use it as a vampire bat for Fright Night.

15. Fright Night's cast and crew took it upon themselves to record some DVD commentaries.

Because the earliest DVD versions of Fright Night contained no commentary tracks, in 2008 the cast and crew partnered with Icons of Fright to record a handful of downloadable “pirate” commentary tracks about the making of the film. The tracks ended up on a limited-edition 30th anniversary Blu-ray of the film, which sold out in hours.

16. Vincent Price loved Fright Night.


Columbia Pictures

Holland had the chance to meet Vincent Price one night at a dinner party at McDowall’s. And the actor was well aware that McDowall’s character was based on him. “I was a little bit embarrassed by it,” Holland admitted. “He said it was wonderful and he thought Roddy did a wonderful job. Thank God he didn’t ask why he wasn’t cast in it.”

7 Timeless Facts About Paul Rudd

Rich Fury, Getty Images
Rich Fury, Getty Images

Younger fans may know Paul Rudd as Ant-Man, one of the newest members of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. However, the actor has been a Hollywood mainstay for half his life.

Rudd's breakout role came in 1995’s Clueless, where he played Josh, Alicia Silverstone's charming love interest in Amy Heckerling's beloved spin on Jane Austen's Emma. In the 2000s, Rudd became better known for his comedic work when he starred in movies like Wet Hot American Summer (2001), Anchorman (2004), The 40-Year-Old Virgin (2005), Knocked Up (2007), and I Love You, Man (2009).

It wasn’t until 2015 that Rudd stepped into the ever-growing world of superhero movies when he was cast as Scott Lang, a.k.a. Ant-Man, and became part of the MCU.

Rudd has proven he can take on any part, serious or goofy. More amazingly, he never seems to age. But in honor of (what is reportedly) his 50th birthday on April 6, here are some things you might not have known about the star.

1. Paul Rudd is technically Paul Rudnitzky.

Though Paul Rudd was born in Passaic, New Jersey, both of his parents hail from London—his father was from Edgware and his mother from Surbiton. Both of his parents were descendants of Jewish immigrants who moved to England from from Russia and Poland. Rudd’s last name was actually Rudnitzky, but it was changed by his grandfather.

2. His parents are second cousins.

In a 2017 episode of Finding Your Roots, Rudd learned that his parents were actually second cousins. Rudd responded to the discovery in typical comedic fashion: "Which explains why I have six nipples." He also wondered what that meant for his own family. "Does this make my son also my uncle?," he asked.

3. He loved comic books as a kid.

While Rudd did read Marvel Comics as a kid, he preferred Archie Comics and other funny stories. His English cousins would send him British comics, too, like Beano and Dandy, which he loved.

4. Rudd wanted to play Christian in Clueless. And Murray.

Clueless would have been a completely different movie if Rudd had been cast as the suave Christian instead of the cute older step-brother-turned-love-interest Josh. But before he was cast as Cher’s beau, he initially wanted the role of the “ringa ding kid” Christian.

"I thought Justin Walker’s character, Christian, was a really good part," Rudd told Entertainment Weekly in 2012. "It was a cool idea, something I’d never seen in a movie before—the cool gay kid. And then I asked to read for Donald Faison's part, because I thought he was kind of a funny hip-hop wannabe. I didn’t realize that the character was African-American.”

5. His role model is Paul Newman.

In a 2008 interview for Role Models, which he both co-wrote and starred in, Rudd was asked about his real-life role model. He answered Paul Newman, saying he admired the legendary actor because he gave a lot to the world before leaving it.

6. Before he was Ant-Man, he wanted to be Adam Ant.

In a 2011 interview with Grantland, Rudd talked about his teenage obsession with '80s English rocker Adam Ant. "Puberty hit me like a Mack truck, and my hair went from straight to curly overnight," Rudd explained. "But it was an easier pill to swallow because Adam Ant had curly hair. I used to ask my mom to try and shave my head on the sides to give me a receding hairline because Adam Ant had one. I didn’t know what a receding hairline was. I just thought he looked cool. She said, 'Absolutely not,' but I was used to that."

Ant wasn't the only musician Rudd tried to emulate. "[My mom] also shot me down when I asked if I could bleach just the top of my head like Howard Jones. Any other kid would’ve been like, 'F*** you, mom! I’m bleaching my hair.' I was too nice," he said.

7. Romeo + Juliet wasn’t Rudd's first go as a Shakespearean actor.

Yet another one of Rudd's iconic '90s roles was in Baz Luhrmann's Romeo + Juliet, but it was far from the actor's first brush with Shakespeare. Rudd spent three years studying Jacobean theater in Oxford, England, and starred in a production of Twelfth Night. He was described by his director, Sir Nicholas Hytner, as having “emotional and intellectual volatility.” Hytner’s praise was a big deal, considering he was the director of London's National Theatre from 2003 until 2015.

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