Apply Now to Join an Archaeological Dig at Colorado's Magic Mountain

iStock
iStock

If you've ever dreamed of digging for artifacts but don't have an archaeology degree, you're in luck—but you'll have to act fast. The Denver Museum of Nature & Science is accepting applications for volunteers interested in joining a community dig this summer at one of Colorado's most important archaeological sites. Applications close May 3, according to Patch.

Located west of Denver, in Golden, the site is called Magic Mountain, named after a failed amusement park that was briefly located there in 1959–1960—more than a decade before the far more famous Magic Mountain opened in Los Angeles. Now owned by the city of Golden, the site was first excavated in the 1950s after a nearby dig revealed that the Fountain Rock Formation, of which Golden is a part, "was a key 'borderland' between the people of the high plains and Great Basin regions," The Denver Post reports.

The oldest artifacts found at the site date back some 7000 years, when the site was used as a camping grounds for hunter-gatherer groups passing through the region during the Archaic and Woodland periods. According to the museum, other artifacts found at the site, including ceramics and stone structures, suggest that a more permanent residence was established there at least 1000 years ago.

"Although Magic Mountain has been previously explored by archaeologists, this project revives the excavation through a community-based effort that will likely lead to new science and discoveries," the project's founders said in a statement, as reported by Patch. "You can be a part of uncovering and sharing human-environmental history over the last 7000 years, if not more!"

Volunteers will be given shovels, trowels, and other tools, and more experienced excavators will be on hand to demonstrate how they're used. No experience is necessary, but volunteers must be at least 18 years old and be able to complete three shifts during one of the two sessions, held June 18–27 and July 5–15. Space is limited for the program, and chosen applicants will be notified by May 7.

Ready to get your hands dirty? You can fill out an online application here.

[h/t Patch]

There Could Be Hundreds of Frozen Corpses Buried Beneath Antarctica's Snow and Ice

Prpix.com.au/Getty Images
Prpix.com.au/Getty Images

Scientists and explorers take a number of risks when they travel to Antarctica. One of the more macabre gambles is that they'll perish during their mission, and their bodies will never be recovered. According to the BBC, hundreds of frozen corpses may be trapped beneath layers and layers of Antarctic snow and ice.

“Some are discovered decades or more than a century later,” Martha Henriques writes for the BBC series Frozen Continent. “But many that were lost will never be found, buried so deep in ice sheets or crevasses that they will never emerge—or they are headed out towards the sea within creeping glaciers and calving ice.”

In the world’s most extreme regions, this is not uncommon. For comparison, some estimates suggest that more than 200 bodies remain on Mt. Everest. Antarctica's icy terrain is rugged and dangerous. Massive crevasses—some concealed by snow—measure hundreds of feet deep and pose a particularly serious threat for anyone crossing them on foot or by dogsled. There’s also the extreme weather: Antarctica is the coldest, driest, and windiest place on Earth, yet scientists recently discovered hundreds of mummified penguins that they believe died centuries ago from unusually heavy snow and rain.

One of the most famous cases of a left-behind body on Antarctica dates back to the British Antarctic Expedition (also known as the Terra Nova Expedition) of 1910 to 1913. British explorer Robert Falcon Scott and his four-man team hoped to be the first ones to reach the South Pole in 1912, but were bitterly disappointed when they arrived and learned that the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen had beaten them to it.

On the return trip, Scott and his companions died of exposure and starvation while trapped by a blizzard in their tent, just 11 miles from a food depot. Two of those bodies were never found, but the others (including Scott’s) were located a few months after their deaths. Members of the search party covered their bodies in the tent with snow and left them there. The bodies have since travelled miles from their original location, as the ice grows and shifts around them.

Other evidence suggests people landed on Antarctica decades before Scott’s team did. A 175-year-old human skull and femur found on Antarctica’s Livingston Island were identified as the remains of a young indigenous Chilean woman. No one yet knows how she got there.

Accidents still happen: After coming close to completing the first solo, unaided traverse of Antarctica, British adventurer Henry Worsley died of organ failure following an airlift from the continent in 2016. Most modern-day polar visitors, however, have learned from past missteps.

[h/t BBC]

Ice Age Wolf Pup and Caribou Mummies Discovered in Yukon

Government of Yukon
Government of Yukon

Officials in Canada recently announced that gold miners in Yukon territory unearthed a mummified wolf pup and caribou calf, both of which roamed the continent during the Ice Age, CBC News reports. The specimens were found preserved in permafrost in Dawson City in 2016, and researchers used carbon dating to determine that the animals are more than 50,000 years old.

While fossils from this period often turn up in the Yukon, fully intact carcasses are a lot rarer, Yukon government paleontologist Grant Zazula told CBC News. “To our knowledge, this is the only mummified Ice Age wolf ever found in the world,” Zazula said.

The caribou calf carcass—which includes the head, torso, and front limbs—still has its skin, muscle, and hair intact. It was found in an area that contains 80,000-year-old volcanic ash. Observed in a similar condition, the wolf pup still has its head, tail, paws, skin, and hair.

A caribou calf
Government of Yukon

Close-up view of the wolf club
Government of Yukon

These findings also hold special significance for the Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in First Nation, an indigenous group in the Yukon. “The caribou has fed and clothed our people for thousands of years,” Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in Chief Roberta Joseph said in a statement. “The wolf maintains balance within the natural world, keeping the caribou healthy. These were an amazing find, and it’s a great opportunity to work collaboratively with the Government of Yukon and our community partners.”

The Canadian Conservation Institute will be tasked with preserving the animal specimens, and the findings will be displayed in Dawson City until the end of the month. They will later be added to an exhibit at the Yukon Beringia Interpretive Centre in Whitehorse.

[h/t CBC]

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