The Original Emojis From 1999 Are Getting Their Own Coffee Table Book

Standard Manuals
Standard Manuals

When designer Shigetaka Kurita came up with the first emoji collection 19 years ago, he likely didn't think it would lead to movies, merchandise, and a universal mode of communication that's grown to include more than 2500 pictographs. Now, fans of the symbols have a chance to appreciate the original set of 176 without tracking down a pager from the 1990s. The publisher Standard Manuals is releasing a hardcover book of the classic emojis with a digital keyboard, and they're raising funds for the project on Kickstarter.

The emoji (from "e," Japanese for picture, and "moji," Japanese for character) first appeared on pagers from the Japanese mobile provider NTT DoCoMo in 1999. The 12-pixel-by-12-pixel designs were popular, but not as phenomenal as the emojis that began appearing on smartphone keyboards about a decade later.

Without that first generation, we may not have gotten many of the symbols that come standard in every emoji pack today. Unicode referred to the original 176 when building its emoji set; that means all the emojis pictured below date back to before the smartphone era.

Grid with new and old emojis.

The Museum of Modern Art acquired Kurita's emoji set in 2016, establishing its status as a vital piece of digital history. The new book, titled Emoji, includes an essay from MoMA senior curator Paola Antonelli and architecture and design collection specialist Paul Galloway in addition to the full-color recreations of each emoji. For those interested in the technical side of things, the book features the black-and-white emoji design against a pixel grid with the original technical data from DoCoMo.

Standard Manual is also offering the original emojis as they were meant to be seen. Each pledge of $75 or more to their Kickstarter campaign comes with a copy of the book plus a free download of the old-school emoji keyboard. Backers have until the end of May to donate, with shipping estimated for October of this year.

Book with smiling emoji in color and black-and-white.

Book with heart emoji in color and black-and-white.

All images courtesy of Standard Manuals

This Adorable, Teeny, Tiny, Pink House Could Be Yours for $11,000

Pin-Up Houses
Pin-Up Houses

Don’t want to be burdened by monthly mortgage payments for the next 30 years of your life? You may want to think smaller and consider trading in your two-bedroom home for a tiny house. While these structures are certainly not for people who like to live lavishly, they might be the ideal choice—and perhaps even a stylish one—for those who embrace minimalism or travel often. At least that seems to be the target market for this hot-pink home spotted by Curbed.

Designed by architect Joshua Woodsman for tiny home purveyor Pin-Up Houses, the “Magenta” house measures just about 11 feet by 6 feet, but has all the basic necessities you’d need. It comes with a small kitchenette, sofa bed, water tank, toilet, gas cooker, and three electrical outlets.

Storage space can be found underneath the sofa bed, and additional belongings can be placed atop nets that are strung across the ceiling and walls. There’s also a table for al fresco dining. The cost? Only $11,000.

The structure is built atop a flatbed trailer, allowing homeowners to hitch it to their car and take it with them wherever they decide to live. The makers of this tiny home call it “a manifesto of temporary independent housing, against debt and mortgages.”

Check out the video below to see the interior and other details.

[h/t Curbed]

This Ingenious Hanger Makes Hanging Pants a Breeze, No Clips or Folds Required

Hurdle Hanger
Hurdle Hanger

Get ready to clean out your closet. No, we don’t mean going all Marie Kondo on your clothes. There’s a new type of clothes hanger that promises to change the way you store your clothes, taking the headache out of hanging up your pants.

The Hurdle Hanger, which has currently raised more than $33,000 on Kickstarter, calls itself the “one-second pants hanger.” Rather than relying on cumbersome clips or requiring bulky folding techniques, the hanger design employs one very simple change: It hooks into the belt loops of your pants.

The angular hanger is open on one side so that you can slide the bar through the belt loops of your pants, letting you secure your pants in one smooth motion rather than struggling with the pant clips that will just wrinkle your waistband anyway.

A person slides the Hurdle Hanger through the belt loops of a pants to hang them.
Hurdle Hanger

Just slide the hanger bar through the belt loop (or loops) farthest from you, then hang the belt loop closest to you from the hook. There is another hook midway across the bar that secures the middle belt loop, keeping your pants from drooping while they hang. In another subtle touch, you can use the same hook to hang smaller items, like belts or hats, off the side.

The Hurdle Hanger is an example of smart design at its finest—the kind of idea that, when you see it in action, makes you think, “Wait, how did no one think of this before?” It takes a once-cumbersome task and makes it seamless, eliminating at least some of the burden that may be keeping you from accomplishing the chore of hanging up your clothes. No more messing with clips or trying to shove pants through the cramped hole in the hanger to fold them over.

There are already open-end pants hangers that make it easier to slide a folded pair of slacks into your closet, but the belt loop hooks take the Hurdle Hanger to another level. You might even get inspired enough to start hanging your jeans.

A 10-pack of hangers is $20 on Kickstarter—though anything that makes you actively excited to organize your closet is priceless.

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